Several great scripted shows got the axe at Fox, as they culled their schedule ahead of upfront. But Lucifer’s story isn’t done yet. Here’s why another network (or streaming service) should give the show a chance.

Warning: Some mild spoilers for Lucifer will be included within the article.

It’s not secret that, much like the dedicated #LuciFans still making the case to save Lucifer, we at Hypable are fans of the show.

Much like the titular Devil himself, it is charming, witty, smart, and utterly captivating. We’re not ready to see Lucifer’s story end, so we’re making the case for why it should be picked up elsewhere.

A procedural show with a twist

Procedural shows, these days, can often be a dime a dozen. They have to be something a little extra special to set themselves apart from the multitude of choice, with varying success on their “defining” feature.

The supernatural angle of Lucifer immediately piqued the interest of its core audience. Though, for the most part, the case of the week is mundane (in that the culprits are often human), it is Lucifer, his unique powers, and how the characters interact with him that differentiates it from the rest of the pack.

A maverick detective is usually involved in some way, shape or form in procedural shows, working outside of the rules and getting away with it for tenuous reasons. Lucifer’s powers, however, mean that his disregard for any kind of protocol works, as he can influence the other characters into accepting that as being perfectly within reason.

Well, except for when it comes to Detective Chloe Decker, who is completely immune to Lucifer’s powers. Her dedication and pride in her work, and strong moral compass, is in direct opposition to Lucifer. Yet the two work incredibly well together, and influence each other in positive, and life-altering ways.

And though the case of the week provides the framework for each episode, it is often the vessel by which the show drives the characters’ individual motivations and relationships, with the case tying into a specific aspect of the lives of the characters — usually Lucifer’s. It is a format that works, and works well, allowing the show to continue forging forward, while the overarching plot develops in the background.

Diversity of characters

There’s a lot to love about the diversity on Lucifer. Several of the characters are confirmed, on screen, to be queer — though they have not had a multi-episode arc or relationship with a same-sex parter. There are also multiple characters of color, and a spectrum of ages.

In fact, that last point was particularly something that felt refreshing. With the professional roles that the characters play, their respective ages suited the experience they must have needed to reach that level of their careers. With much of the rest of Hollywood skewing younger and younger, Lucifer cast actors that felt right in the roles they were playing.

On that point, that the characters also have their own successful careers, but aren’t defined solely by them — with several of them also being parents, and allowed to experience the push-and-pull of balancing their work and home lives — is another refreshing aspect. They are also allowed to make mistakes, which are (often) appropriately met with consequences.

Additionally, for where the show is predominantly set — in Los Angeles — it genuinely felt like it was true reflection of the people that live there. Which shouldn’t be something that is necessary to praise in 2018, yet Lucifer made a point to ensure that it showcased.

The relationships

Lucifer, though it does have several compelling, and slow-burn romances that have been building over its three seasons — we’re looking at you, especially, Deckerstar — also has so many other relationships that are intrinsic to the show.

The family unit of Chloe Decker, Dan Esposito, and Trixie was something that was immediately captivating. Chloe and Dan, who are separated, co-parent Trixie and are (for the most part) amiable with each other. That friendship, and closeness, between the characters, despite their previous intimate relationship and the dissolution of it, was refreshing. It would have been so easy to lean into the potential animosity, and built in drama, yet it came from other aspects of their lives.

Additionally, the friendships between the cast of characters is varied, and has a huge focus on the female relationships especially. Over the course of the time the show has been on the air, those friendships have developed in ones that are supportive, and fierce, with each of the women becoming devoted to each other, and protective of one another. Again, it would have been easy to keep leaning into pitting the women off one another, but over time the show moved further and further away from that tired trope, making those friendships essential to their respective support networks.

And, of course, there are the romances. They are complex, messy, yet passionate, sweet, and, yes, loving. Some are flash-in-the-pan, one-offs, and others have built up slowly, excruciatingly slow in some cases. It reflects how some of those relationships are in life. They’re not all going to be a happily-ever-after situation, and they aren’t always going to be the right person, at the right time.

The real Deckerstar of those relationships is the one between Lucifer and Chloe. It has developed from something of a professional-only relationship, to a odd fascination on Lucifer’s part, to friendship, to something more. Each step has built steadily in a way that felt natural, and earned. It was never forced, and faced several setbacks, but it just made the journey to where they finally were, at the close of season 3, all the sweeter.

We’re certainly not ready to give up those relationships. Any of them. (And, really, they absolutely cannot leave Chloe and Lucifer there without a resolution. We refuse to accept that.)

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