Last week was Lost week, with May 23rd marking the one year anniversary of the series finale of the television phenomenon. You might not have liked how it ended, or even stuck with the show through all six seasons, but no one can deny the tremendous, revolutionizing effect that Lost had on television drama, and how influential it has been in pop culture.

To celebrate the occasion, I want to dedicate my first column to Lost – my favorite TV show of all time (with the possible exception of Buffy). Instead of writing a long essay about how much the show has affected my life and blah blah, I have put together a list of my top 5 episodes of all time. As it turns out… not an easy task!

 


Now, there are so many directions you could take this list in. The best mythology episodes, the best character episodes, the most classic Lost episodes… ultimately though, I’ve tried to mix it up, and I’ve also tried to pick some episodes that aren’t necessarily obvious choices for a top 5 list. Feel free to disagree in the comments! I’m sure I’ve missed your favorite – seeing as I decided to spice things up and leave ‘The Constant’ off the list. Dun dun dunnn.

 

Honorable mentions: ‘The Man From Tallahassee,’ ‘The Moth,’ ‘Jughead,’ ‘The Shape of Things to Come,’ ‘Exodus Parts 2 & 3’. (Oh look what I did – now it’s a top 10!)

 

5. ‘The Incident’ (5×16/5×17)
Written by Damon Lindelof and Carlton Cuse, directed by Jack Bender. Multi/Jacob-centric.

One of the things Lost did best was undeniably season finales. In fact, the only finale that didn’t make my jaw drop and my tears flow was ‘Live Together, Die Alone’ in season 2, and I think I’m in the minority there. I felt I needed to have a finale on this list, and after much deliberation I went with ‘The Incident.’ I thought about ‘Exodus,’ too, but I already have two episodes from season 1 on here, and the later seasons needed some love, too. Also, ‘The Incident’ is one of the best examples in Lost of a multi-centric episode, which shows us how each Candidate was selected (some as children, like Sawyer and Kate, others as adults) by Jacob – who we meet for the first time in this episode! On the island in 1977, Jack is about to detonate the hydrogen bomb, desperate to change the characters’ future and save the people that have died on the island – and what makes this even more powerful is that when season 6 opens, we are led to believe that it worked. Juliet is pulled down into the hole where Jack tossed the bomb (so full of faith and so sure that it would work), and though it didn’t technically happen till ‘LA X,’ Juliet dying is probably the single most upsetting, tragic Lost death, bar Jin and Sun. In this episode, Jack and Sawyer also come to blows, which was a long time coming; we are reunited with the now “retired” Rose and Bernard, and of course Ben kills Jacob, and Locke is revealed to be the Man in Black. So exciting!

Best moment: Aside from the great character moments and the romantic nods to Jack/Kate and Juliet/Sawyer, there really were two scenes in this episode that in a perfect world would go down in history as some of the best drama on television. The first being the opening scene which shows us Jacob and Man in Black for the first time, and is a classic Lost OMG-moment when we realize who we are looking at. The second scene is the finale’s final moment in which Juliet, broken and bleeding, uses her last bit of strength to hammer on the bomb until the screen explodes in a white light, leading into a polarized “LOST” title card.

Dialogue:

Man in Black: Do you have any idea how badly I want to kill you?
Jacob: Yes.
Man in Black: One of these days, sooner or later, I’m going to find a loophole, my friend.

Sawyer: Why are you doing this, Juliet?
Juliet: If I never meet you, then I never have to lose you.

 

4. ‘The Other 48 Days’ (2×07)
Written by Damon Lindelof and Carlton Cuse, directed by Eric Laneuville. Tailie-centric.

What I love about ‘The Other 48 Days’ is how it completely breaks style – which is hard to do in a show that tackles a different genre every episode – by moving from “our” characters to a group of what is practically strangers to the audience. We were told in season 1 that there were other survivors from Flight 815, in the season finale we met Ana Lucia and saw how close Jack was to taking her place, and in season 2 they were introduced as violent savages who captured Jin, Michael and Sawyer (“Udders! Udders!”). But now, we are getting their entire, tragic story, and it’s a real twilight zone episode where we take a step back from the troubles our characters are facing and say phew, at least they weren’t in the tail section! Because these guys have it really tough. They are systematically attacked by the Others, and their numbers dwindle eerily fast, until it’s only a small group of survivors roughing it up in the jungle, fighting traitors and mutiny along the way. Ana Lucia is the Tailies’ version of Jack, but an inverted character of sorts: where Jack is a doctor and doesn’t initially want to lead anyone, Ana is a cop and immediately takes control. Eko is their Locke, but he is violent and silent – though in some ways more honest. This episode is suspenseful and disjointed, with title cards counting down to the present day (‘Abandoned,’ in which Ana shoots Shannon) when the two camps collide and we finally understand what has led Ana Lucia and her group to behave the way they do. A lot of people didn’t like the Tailies when they were first brought in, but personally I liked the change of pace they brought to the story, and the contrast that was created between the Losties whose story we’d been following, and the “other” group. Another reason I liked this episode was because it was pure island story, with no off-island flashbacks. That makes it more fun to rewatch!

Best moment: When Ana finally breaks down and cries. Complete with the Michael Giacchino-composed score, ‘Ana Cries.’ Also, when Ana Lucia and Goodwin talk, right before she kills him. It’s deliciously tense, and Goodwin reveals a lot about the nature of the enigmatic Others: they judge people as “good” or “bad” and take the ones they want, and as we later learn, Goodwin lobbied hard for Ana, who wasn’t supposed to be one of the good ones.

Dialogue:

Ana Lucia: What, you talking now?
Eko: It’s been forty days.
Ana Lucia: You’ve been waiting forty days to talk?
Eko: You waited forty days to cry.

Ana Lucia: Did you kill him?
Goodwin: Nathan was not a good person. That’s why he wasn’t on the list.

 

3. ‘Flashes Before Your Eyes’ (3×08)
Written by Damon Lindelof and Drew Goddard, directed by Jack Bender. Desmond-centric.

See, here’s the thing: I’ve always been a fan of Desmond and his flash-whatever-they-weres, but I think ‘The Constant’ is hugely overrated. Aside from the final scene, which was amazing, the episode was very confusing and there was quite a bit of throwaway plot about Desmond running around on a boat with a nose bleed. Personally, I think ‘Flashes’ was a far more solid episode, and much more iconic and significant in the larger scheme of things. This episode marks the first time Lost does any kind of time jumping, it introduces Eloise Hawking, and expands on Desmond’s premonitions. Desmond waking up after the Hatch detonation covered in paint, the creation of the Desmond/Penny photo as well as the engagement ring sinking down into the water are some of the most memorable images in the history of the show, and the final, shell-shocking revelation that fan favorite Charlie was destined to die was game changing. Instead of once again wondering which character would die this year, the audience was instead left to wonder when and if Charlie would die. Which he did. And sad as it was, it was still the ultimate storyline payoff. The Desmond/Penny scenes in this episode were great, and to this day I’m still left wondering how much of this was real, and how much Desmond re-constructed in his mind… It’s close to a perfect episode, this one, with very few insignificant moments.

Best moment: So many! Desmond meeting Charlie and predicting the rain, that was chilling! There’s also the Eloise Hawking scene on the bench, when she talks about the inevitability of fate, which would set the tone for the entire rest of the series… and of course we can’t forget that infamous MacCutcheon whiskey scene with Charles Widmore.

Dialogue:

Desmond: Why do you love me?
Penny: Because you’re a good man. In my experience they’re pretty hard to come by.

Ms. Hawking: The universe, unfortunately, has a way of course-correcting. That man was supposed to die; that was his path. Just as it’s your path to go to the island. You don’t do it because you choose to, Desmond. You do it because you’re supposed to.

Widmore: What you’re not, is worthy of drinking my whiskey. How could you ever be worthy of my daughter?

 

2. ‘The Pilot, Part 1’ (1×01)
Written by J.J. Abrams and Damon Lindelof, directed by J.J. Abrams. Jack-centric.

This is probably, everything taken into consideration, the best episode of the show. But I feel it has an unfair advantage: ‘The Pilot’ episode of Lost had the budget of a cinematic feature, and was produced over a significant length of time. Compare that to, say, the Buffy or Supernatural pilots and it’s a very different story. Some say that the show went downhill ever since its first episode, but while I love every single moment of the pilot, I disagree. I was one of the people that stuck with the show till ‘The End,’ not because of what it used to be but because of what it developed into. Still, ‘The Pilot’ deserves a high place on this Top 5 list, if for nothing else then because it is the episode I have re-watched the most times, and the only episode except ‘Exodus’ which I believe I’ll never get tired of. ‘The Pilot’’s strength (besides from being one of the only pilot episodes in television history entitled ‘The Pilot’ where that title is actually relevant to the plot) is that we are briefly introduced to a lot of characters, but the glimpses we get into who they are speak of everything that is to come (at least everything the writers knew at this point). When we first meet Kate, we don’t know that she’s a criminal with a heart of gold who killed her father and has a chronic “running away problem,” and heck, the actress doesn’t even know it, but the character does. The acting from the entire cast is mindblowing all through the first season, and the characters are simultaneously complete mysteries and so fully realized. So much character and romance groundwork is laid in just these first 40 minutes, the cinematography and music is amazing, and the initial monster mystery might be the show’s best one ever.

Best moment: If I was wearing a hat, I’d take it off for Evangeline Lilly, who delivered one of the most powerful performances on the small screen I’ve ever seen, when she was running from the monster in the jungle and counted down from five to make herself less scared. Lilly took a lot of heat over the years for her character’s ambiguous romantic attachments, but I’ve always maintained that as an actress, she was outstanding from start to finish, and managed to portray the duality of the character (and thus her conflicted feelings for Jack and Sawyer, the two parts of herself) perfectly. And of course, Locke eating the orange Godfather-style: best ease of tension ever.

Dialogue:

Jack: So I just made a choice. I’d let the fear in. Let it take over, let it do its thing. But only for five seconds, that’s all I was gonna give it. So I started to count: 1… 2… 3… 4… 5. And it was gone. I went back to work, sewed her up, and she was fine.
Kate: If that had been me, I think I would’ve run for the door.
Jack: No, I don’t think that’s true. You’re not running now.

Charlie : (to Kate) I heard you yell. I heard you yell, ‘Jack’. I’m Charlie, by the way.

 

1. ‘Walkabout’ (1×04)
Written by David Fury, directed by Jack Bender. Locke-centric.

“Don’t tell me what I can’t put on my Top 5 List!” The funny thing about ‘Walkabout’ having the top spot is that in my first draft of this, I’d bumped the episode off the list completely for ‘The Man From Tallahassee.’ My main argument there was that I had too many season 1 episodes on the list, and that ‘TMFT’ answered why Locke was in a wheelchair. But then I thought, sure, but what trumps that? Finding out that Locke was in a wheelchair! And that moment, more than any other, was what made Lost a must-watch show, and set it apart from other television dramas. Locke is definitely up there as one of my favorite characters, and Terry O’Quinn is just an incredibly talented actor. I’ve watched this episode with a lot of different people who were seeing it for the first time, and though it seems obvious now that Locke was paralyzed in the flashbacks, not a single person I’ve seen it with picked up on it. No matter how many times I watch it, the episode is still so incredibly powerful: here’s this awesome guy who Boone assumes is in the army, yet back home he works at a box company, trying to have a relationship with a sex line employee and trying to fulfill his life dream of going on a walkabout only to be turned away. The other star of this episode is Michael Giacchino, who produced beautiful music to the show, and whose haunting ‘Locked Out Again’ score only makes the episode ten times better. Whenever I think of Lost, my mind immediately goes to ‘Walkabout,’ and it’s the one episode about which I’ve never heard a bad word from anyone. It just doesn’t get better than this.

Best moment: When Locke is told he can’t go on the walkabout and the bus drives away, leaving him in his wheelchair. And then when Claire is holding the memorial service at the end, Locke looks at his wheelchair and smiles… he’s found his destiny.

Dialogue:

Locke: Don’t you walk away from me! You don’t know who you’re dealing with! Don’t ever tell me what I can’t do, ever! This is destiny. This is destiny. This is… this is my destiny. This… I’m supposed to do this, dammit! Don’t tell me what I can’t do!

Jack: (after Locke throws a knife at Sawyer) You either have very good aim… or very bad aim.

 

So there you have it, my top 5 Lost episodes! I struggled with this list for days, and I had maybe 15 episodes that I kept changing out at random, completely unable to decide. How do you leave episodes like ‘The Shape of Things to Come’ and ‘The Man Behind the Curtain’ off a respectable Lost list?? And what about ‘Through the Looking Glass’ and ‘Ab Aeterno!’ And others might say, how dare you leave off ‘The End’ or ‘The Constant’! I know at least one person who’d complain about the absence of ‘Hunting Party,’ too… but I reckon that’s just the one person, there. Truth is, Lost is an extremely subjective show because whatever episode is ‘best’ for you will depend on what characters, storylines, relationships, mysteries and time periods you like the best. I arrived at a list that I feel fairly confident won’t keep me up at night, but there were plenty of episodes it pained me to leave out. Just goes to show what an incredible six years the show gave us – and today, one year later, I still haven’t “let go”… Time to dust off those old DVDs in time for a summer rewatch, I think!

Do you agree/disagree with my choices? Share your own list in the comments!

Screencaps from: Lost-Media.com

Exclusive

Hypable dives deep into Crooked Kingdom with Leigh Bardugo, discussing the art, heart, and future of her dynamic duology Six of Crows.

In addition to Six of Crows and Crooked Kingdom, Bardugo is the author of the best-selling Grisha Trilogy, and is currently writing a young-adult Wonder Woman novel.

Crooked Kingdom, due out tomorrow, continues the tale of Kaz Brekker and his motley gang of young (and only occasionally reluctant) criminals. Set in the chilly streets of Ketterdam, Kaz’s crew finds themselves working against the clock in game where the stakes have risen from “seriously high” to “catastrophically personal.”

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Hypable dives deep into Crooked Kingdom with Leigh Bardugo, discussing the art, heart, and future of her dynamic duology Six of Crows.

In addition to Six of Crows and Crooked Kingdom, Bardugo is the author of the best-selling Grisha Trilogy, and is currently writing a young-adult Wonder Woman novel.

Crooked Kingdom, due out tomorrow, continues the tale of Kaz Brekker and his motley gang of young (and only occasionally reluctant) criminals. Set in the chilly streets of Ketterdam, Kaz’s crew finds themselves working against the clock in game where the stakes have risen from “seriously high” to “catastrophically personal.”

Cunningly magical and exactingly scientific, Bardugo’s work celebrates quirks of character, and champions diverse protagonists who challenge readers on every page — which is just about as often as they challenge themselves.

This interview is spoiler-free for Crooked Kingdom.

Interview with Leigh Bardugo

One of the major differences between Six of Crows and the Grisha Trilogy is the way you utilize perspective. How did you decide to structure the duology among multiple points of view?

I knew when I wanted to tell a heist story that I didn’t want to tell it first-person POV. It can be done, if I’m not mistaken, Ally Carter wrote her heist books in first person, but I had a clear idea of how I wanted to break the chapters, and how I wanted to release information. And I feel like that’s what heists and cons are really about.

Both Holly Black, and Ally Carter and I have all commiserated on the challenges of writing a heist, and I can’t remember which one of them said it, but it’s not just about conning the mark — it’s about conning the reader. And I felt like having these different, shifting perspectives would give me more opportunities to do that.

Obviously, that structure is very George R.R. Martin-esque. Did you take any inspiration from the point-of-view structure in A Song of Ice and Fire?

As far as I’m concerned, A Song of Ice and Fire is my touchstone for fantasy, particularly the first three books. And I think there are certain things I’ve definitely taken from [Martin], like the geography as destiny. But also, starting with redshirt who gets killed off is very much a Martin trick! [laughs] But it was also kind of a way to get people up to speed in terms of the powers that existed in the Grisha world and the potential for what [jurda parem] could do… to put everything on the playing field and move into the rest of the action.

six-of-crows1

Did you find much of a difference between writing Six of Crows and writing Crooked Kingdom? Very little time passes between the two books, but almost everybody is in radically different mindsets.

I think the biggest difference in Crooked Kingdom is, in the beginning of Six of Crows, Kaz is assembling the team. So you have some people who know each other, but you have some who don’t, and none of them trust each other — with the exclusion of Kaz and Inej, but even that is trust with conditions.

And then they go through hell together, which naturally changes the way that they interact with each other, and the way that they think about each other. And so that’s really where they are in Crooked Kingdom. Six of Crows has this escalating level of action and interaction between these characters, whereas Crooked Kingdom, we hit the ground running. I think that there’s a lot more progress in those relationships because of what they’ve been through.

Let’s talk about Kaz for a bit — the guy with, ostensibly, all the answers. Where is he emotionally in Crooked Kingdom? How did you decide to employ him in the book?

He comes in a little later, but he’s definitely not used sparingly. It’s interesting, because I’ve always thought of Inej as the heart of the books, and I was talking to a friend recently and she was like, “Crooked Kingdom is much more her book.” And I was like, “Really? I think of Six of Crows as being very much her book!” But whoever reads it, they see a different hero, or a different protagonist, that the arc belongs to them. But I think everybody has pretty steep hill to climb with this one, honestly.

Early in the book, Kaz thinks that, over the course of the three days Inej has been missing, he has murdered the old Kaz Brekker, and now he’s all business. I was really struck by that — I thought he was all business before!

Well, Kaz has some very clear ideas on how you are able to survive in the world. And there are certain tools that have served him very well. It’s not an easy idea — he really believes there are punishments for making yourself vulnerable. And the truth is, in this environment that is 100% true. And that fact does not change throughout the book. That is the reality of the world that they live in. But whether or not Kaz can actually keep his humanity at bay is a different story.

He does start off involved in some fairly brutal business at the beginning of the book. It’s interesting, because you don’t pull many punches in Six of Crows, but in Crooked Kingdom it feels like… well, the gloves are not off, but the gloves are off!

[laughs] That should have been the tagline! “The gloves are not off! Crooked Kingdom!” I’m ready for that movie trailer.

You know, it’s interesting. In some ways, I think that… I don’t think Crooked Kingdom is necessarily a darker book. There are a lot of dark things that happen in it, but it is also… because these characters know each other better, I think… I mean, maybe I’m wrong, you never know when you’ve written a book what people are going to take from it. But for me, there are actually quite a lot of moments of lightness and hijinks. I think I felt freer to let them have certain adventures that were… I don’t want to use the word “zany!” But there’s a pleasure in going a little bit over the top when it comes to heists and cons, and I really wanted to indulge that.

crooked kingdom leigh bardugo interview

And because it is only a duology, there was a lot that had to happen emotionally. And I really am not into being beaten over the head with grimdark. My personality is like, is I sense tension in the room or if something bad has happened, I inevitably make the wisecrack. And I think that that sense of humor imbues the books — or I hope it does.

So would you say that Jesper takes some of that from you?

Yeah, probably! Jesper actually [says] in Crooked Kingdom, that he always thought of himself as a lucky guy. He’d always thought of himself as a generally happy person. And one of the things he has to contend with in this book is digging a little deeper than that, and understanding where his own compulsions come from, and some of the choices that he’s made. And the idea of acknowledging that there’s something beneath this easygoing manner. But I love writing Jesper. A lot.

And which character would you say you find the easiest to write?

You know, it depends on the book. In Six of Crows, the easiest character to write was Matthias, because he’s so dogmatic. He has such strong opinions, and he also has this very mannered, old school fantasy way of thinking. He has this kind of Arthurian bent to him. So he was very easy to write, but I think in terms of the character that was the most fun to write, it was probably Jesper.

In Crooked Kingdom, it was Wylan, because he was the person I was discovering most about as I wrote him. And he’s also in some ways the most YA of all the characters, because he has, for a big chunk of his life, despite the things that were going on at home with his father, has led a fairly sheltered life compared to the rest of these characters.

Speaking of YA, how do you balance the youth of Kaz and co. with their at times very mature exploits? At times, I find myself thinking, “These kids are so young!”

I think of them as sort of like CW teenagers! But I also think, you know, adolescence is a very modern construct, and we tend to forget about that. But I always say, what would Arya Stark be like at 17?

Stabby?

Very stabby. And very cynical! I get why there’s a certain suspension of disbelief required for the characters ages, and in truth, when I go to a high school to speak, or I go to a signing and I meet actual 16 and 17-year-olds, I’m like, “Oh my God! You are but wee children! You are but walking, talking, fetuses! I can’t put you in these horrible circumstances!” [laughs]

But I also think that that’s one of the conventions of YA — and also, look, life is nasty, brutish, and short in the worlds that I create. So unless you are of a very privileged class, and even then, you are probably not going to have a whole lot of time to eke out an existence.

It’s interesting, because Nina undergoes a very adolescent-like experience in Crooked Kingdom, grappling with the ways she has changed. In Six of Crows, she’s like Lady Confidence, and now…

Yeah, Nina’s confidence is shaken in a very fundamental way because of her attachment to her power, and it’s something that she’s never had to question before. And there are other things about her that remain unshaken, and she knows who she is on a lot of levels.

You know, I don’t think there’s anything interesting about keeping a character in one place. And people always talk about, “Oh, who are you going to kill off?” The worst thing you can do is not kill somebody off. One of the lessons that I really took from reading George R.R. Martin is, you take the thing that the character thinks defines them, and then you take it away, and you see what happens. That’s the Jaime Lannister lesson. And that, to me, was the exciting thing to do with some of the characters in the book.

Speaking of taking things from characters, what kind of challenges is Kaz facing internally at the start of Crooked Kingdom?

I think this is the moment when Kaz is deciding who is going to be. Because his life has been all about revenge, and one of the questions that Inej poses to him is not really about his attachment to her. It’s about, what comes after that? Are you just going to become exactly like the man you’re looking to destroy? Because the methods Kaz pursues are not any less ruthless than Pekka Rollins’.

He prides himself on that, actually.

Yes. Although he and Rollins have different ideas about where the lines are drawn. I think this is the book where all of the demons come home to roost. It’s the revenge and redemption book, but it’s also, which demon is going to win, essentially.

Kaz reminds me in a lot of ways of Locke Lamora from Scott Lynch’s Gentleman Bastard series — but ironically, Locke is a lot better-hearted than Kaz.

I actually read Lies of Locke Lamora after I wrote Six of Crows, because I had heard a lot about it, people had been telling me to read it for years. And then I read it, because I was really afraid that it would be so much like Six of Crows that I would be like, “Oh no! What have I done!” But as it turns out, they’re not at all alike.

Locke is very much the mode of the like, kindhearted trickster, as opposed to Kaz, who is like, “I will cut out your kind heart and eat it!”

Do you think of him at all like the Darkling from the Grisha Trilogy? They both have a profoundly diabolical streak.

I think the Darkling is a much more noble character than Kaz. The Darkling may have lost the thread in terms of his humanity and the cost of human life, but he has, ostensibly, noble goals. He’s a patriot, he believes in protecting his people, he’s trying to build a future for the Grisha that isn’t one of persecution. There are a lot of ways to defend the Darkling that don’t work for Kaz, who is very much out for himself, and out for revenge. And revenge is not necessarily a noble goal. It’s something you sympathize with, but it’s not something that is bigger than him.

But I really, [laughs] I really enjoyed writing him. And sometimes he would take me by surprise! And I don’t say that lightly, because I think of myself as very much in control of my characters — they don’t tell me what to do. But I remember writing the scene on the ship with Oomen and thinking, well, what is Kaz going to do here? And it was sort of like Kaz took over, and was like, “I’m telling you what I’m going to do!”

I took a great deal of pleasure in writing the details of that scene, and it’s weird, because I always know when people get to that scene. I know what page it is, because they’re like, “Page 158! Ahhh!” And the weird thing for me is, I’m like, I think it’s kind of romantic! He’ll poke a guy’s eye out for you, baby, and then throw him in the drink!

It is very sweet, in a murderous way. Were there any similar moments where you thought Kaz went overboard? Or did you ever have to push him?

I pulled back, actually. In Crooked Kingdom there was a torture scene that I ended up taking out, because it was just too much. It’s not that it was implausible for the character, but there was already enough brutality happening. And I think sometimes we’re pulled toward these things because they have a certain amount of emotional resonance in them, and high stakes in them.

But I think we also, somehow the idea of being dark, or edgy, or gritty, has come to mean that you’re somehow more legitimate or the story is weightier. And I try to sometimes consciously push against that, because I want this world to feel real, I want it to feel like the peril is real, but we do write for young people. And I want my readers to be able to follow me there without feeling hopeless.

Looking at the bigger picture, how did it feel to craft this story as a duology?

Weird! [laughs] I’m honestly a real lover of structure. I believe very firmly in the resonances of narrative structure, and to me they kind of provide a safety net for writing. I can look at my own stories and say, okay, well, this was squishy here, or this moment needed to come sooner, or this wasn’t a strong enough twist. And to me, the natural structure for a story is three acts. And I think that’s still the story that got told, it just got told in two books. That second act did not belong to it’s own book. But it’s funny, I sort of thought of it — it just always felt like this shape.

And for the characters who survive, there could continue to be stories, but for this particular moment, this is the moment where we pause with them. And in some ways, it just felt like it always had this shape, is the best way I can put it.

I love the duology format — there’s a natural urgency to it, I think, and that serves the heist story particularly well.

It does, it does. And I’ve always sort of thought of these books as, when I set out to write them, I told my editor — I gave her a proposal, but I said, I’ve never written a book like this before. So I don’t know if it’s one book, or if it’s two books, or if it’s three books, and we’ll just have to play it by ear. And at the end of the first book, I was like, okay. I can tie up all of the plot-things easy, there’s a very natural way to do this. I was like, but the emotional things I wanted to do with these characters, they went deeper and darker than I expected them to, and there’s no way they can earn the endings that I think they deserve in one book.

It’s true, at the end of Six of Crows it feels like the characters think they’ve reached their endings, and they haven’t.

I think too, that’s what makes heists interesting. There’s the fun side of them, but the thing that really makes them exciting, particularly in books as opposed to film is what the challenges are that the characters have to overcome. People enter in, these are characters who appear highly competent at the beginning of Six of Crows, and then they face these challenges… that undermine that competence, and that’s what makes the heist exciting.

It’s not that like, OH! This is happening! And this is blowing up! Or this person got caught! It’s what they have to overcome personally within the story. And for Crooked Kingdom, that was kind of doubly true, because they have this whole new set of challenges that are coming out them, and they’ve just had their armor torn to bits, so they’re a lot more vulnerable to those challenges.

So moving forward, what are you working on now?

Well, I’m working on Wonder Woman right now, and I have a couple of other projects that I can’t talk about yet, but one is one that I have been wanting to write for a very long time. And some other things cooking!

What is it like writing Wonder Woman?

You know, it’s really very joyful! The strange thing about it is that I have just come off the heels of writing these very morally compromised characters, and Diana has her own challenges to contend with, but she is at her heart a very kind hero. And it’s one of the things I think people love so much about her, is that she has this deep empathy, and this deep kindness.

She comes from a culture where that is valued, and where the suffering of others means something. And so it’s been really fun to write her! And I feel like I’m in a better mood! I’ll come out of my writing day, and I’m like, oh, I feel good! And then I’m like, maybe it’s because I wasn’t writing about murder and torture!

So it’s been great. I feel like there’s obviously a tremendous weight of expectations that are attached to the character and I want to do right by the character, but I’m really glad I’m doing it. I don’t think there’s any other character I would have wanted to put my other work aside for than Wonder Woman.

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Crooked Kingdom by Leigh Bardugo is available tomorrow from Amazon, Barnes & Noble, and your local independent bookstore.

What are your top theories for ‘Crooked Kingdom’?

Anyone who received a mole or rat Patronus in J.K. Rowling’s new quiz is getting a little reassurance from the Harry Potter author.

Last week Pottermore took the fandom by storm when they debuted the long-awaited Patronus quiz. It’s a next-level personality quiz — it’s beautiful and provides a real sense of magic. Overall, we love it!

There’s just one problem: Many people are getting Patronuses they don’t particularly like. After all this waiting, these poor fans got stuck with a creature that they’re allergic to (cats), are scared of (rats), or they simply don’t like (moles).

Read full article

Anyone who received a mole or rat Patronus in J.K. Rowling’s new quiz is getting a little reassurance from the Harry Potter author.

Last week Pottermore took the fandom by storm when they debuted the long-awaited Patronus quiz. It’s a next-level personality quiz — it’s beautiful and provides a real sense of magic. Overall, we love it!

There’s just one problem: Many people are getting Patronuses they don’t particularly like. After all this waiting, these poor fans got stuck with a creature that they’re allergic to (cats), are scared of (rats), or they simply don’t like (moles).

Over the weekend Rowling fielded a couple of complaints by offering the upside to getting a rat or mole Patronus.

Rat Patronus explanation:

Mole Patronus explanation:

All told, there are over 140 Patronuses. Can she get to work on writing reassuring comments on every single one of ’em?

In a press release announcing the Patronus quiz, Pottermore said that “further new information and features will be revealed about the spell and its outcomes” in the “months to come.” Hopefully that means we really are getting detailed explanations.

Related: Hypable’s staff reacts to their Patronus results and what they mean

Exclusive

At Copenhagen Comic-Con, Hypable caught up with Game of Thrones actress Kerry Ingram for a chat about Shireen’s horrific death scene, Netflix, and horseback riding.

It seemed like a full-circle moment when I got to sit down with Kerry Ingram and tell her just how much Shireen Baratheon’s death upset me. Even on a show like Game of Thrones, which makes an art out of assaulting its viewers’ senses, that particular scene felt like it crossed a line — and that was just my reaction, watching safely from behind a computer screen! How must the actress herself feel, having to actually act out her character’s death at such a young age?

This led to a wider musing about what Game of Thrones does to protect its child actors from the horrific things their characters experience. (Ingram is now 17, but was only barely in her mid-teens when that scene was filmed.) I also wondered if she ever went back and watched the scene. Turned out she watched it live with the rest of us — but, luckily, she was able to find the fun side of the situation: Outraged reactions like my own. The irony is sweet.

Read full article

At Copenhagen Comic-Con, Hypable caught up with Game of Thrones actress Kerry Ingram for a chat about Shireen’s horrific death scene, Netflix, and horseback riding.

It seemed like a full-circle moment when I got to sit down with Kerry Ingram and tell her just how much Shireen Baratheon’s death upset me. Even on a show like Game of Thrones, which makes an art out of assaulting its viewers’ senses, that particular scene felt like it crossed a line — and that was just my reaction, watching safely from behind a computer screen! How must the actress herself feel, having to actually act out her character’s death at such a young age?

This led to a wider musing about what Game of Thrones does to protect its child actors from the horrific things their characters experience. (Ingram is now 17, but was only barely in her mid-teens when that scene was filmed.) I also wondered if she ever went back and watched the scene. Turned out she watched it live with the rest of us — but, luckily, she was able to find the fun side of the situation: Outraged reactions like my own. The irony is sweet.

At Copenhagen Comic-Con 2016 I got to ask Kerry Ingram all this and more, while also diving into more fun topics like Shireen and Arya’s hypothetical take-over of Westeros, and Ingram’s new Netflix series, on which she plays ‘Becky with the good hair’ and gets to do lots of horseback riding. Watch the full interview below:

Ingram’s new Netflix series stars Jaylen Barron as Zoë, a 15-year-old American girl whose stay at Bright Field Stables in the U.K. leads her to form an unexpected friendship with a mysterious horse named Raven.

The Lime Pictures drama also stars Celine Buckens and Natalie Gumede. It was created by Anna McCleery and Vicki Lutas, and is tentatively expected to premiere on Netflix in 2017.

Follow Kerry Ingram on Twitter to keep up with her latest projects. Read more Game of Thrones news right here on Hypable.

This interview was done in collaboration with the Danish entertainment site Kulturbunkeren. Thanks to Copenhagen Comic-Con for making it possible!