It’s the role of a lifetime – the chance to steam up the screen as Regency heart-throb Mr. Darcy in Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice. We’ve seen many Darcys over the years, but who was the best? Now you get to decide.

Yesterday was the bicentenary of the publication of Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice. There’s no need to be scandalised by our blatant objectification of these leading men, we did the literary appreciation and analysis part yesterday, so now we can get to the really important matter – who was the hottest Mr. Darcy? Ladies and gentlemen, get your votes ready.

First, straight to the source. What did Austen have to say about Darcy in Pride and Prejudice?

“…Mr. Darcy soon drew the attention of the room by his fine, tall person, handsome features, noble mien; and the report which was in general circulation within five minutes after his entrance, of his having ten thousand a year.

The gentlemen pronounced him to be a fine figure of a man, the ladies declared he was much handsomer than Mr. Bingley, and he was looked at with great admiration for about half the evening, till his manners gave a disgust which turned the tide of his popularity; for he was discovered to be proud, to be above his company, and above being pleased; and not all his large estate in Derbyshire could then save him from having a most forbidding, disagreeable countenance, and being unworthy to be compared with his friend.”

Laurence Olivier in ‘Pride and Prejudice’ (1940)


Honestly, we can’t imagine Olivier is going to swing the vote, but we had to start at the beginning. This 1940 film starred Olivier as our leading man, opposite Greer Garson as Elizabeth Bennet. He looks slightly older, and more serious than the Darcys we have come to know in recent adaptations, but he was the first person to play the role in a prominent adaptation. Anyway, just look at that jawline, it certainly deserves some votes. And everyone always looks better in black and white.

Colin Firth in ‘Pride and Prejudice’ (1995)


Firth is going to be difficult to beat, we imagine. What else can be said, the man jumps into a lake in a white shirt and emerges totally soaked, oh my. He was brooding and sexy on screen, in a way that made it very clear that he thought he was better than everyone else – how very Mr. Darcy. Firth left most of the female population (and we dare say, a lot of the males as well) swooning in front of their televisions, as he tried to win over Jennifer Ehle as the lovely Miss Bennet. Well, he certainly won us over.

Martin Henderson in ‘Bride and Prejudice’ (2005)


Martin Henderson had his turn at Fitzwilliam Darcy in the somewhat questionable Bollywood adaptation of Pride and Prejudice, not so wittily titled Bride and Prejudice. The fairly loose adaptation of Austen’s plot, and the modern day setting allowed Darcy to be somewhat more relaxed than in other versions – showing a different side to his character which many audience members responded to. Some fans may miss the usual English accent, but at least we get to see Darcy’s version of Bollywood dancing.

Matthew Macfadyen in ‘Pride and Prejudice’ (2005)


Matthew Macfadyen brought Jane Austen to a whole new generation in Joe Wright’s 2005 film, which also starred Keira Knightley. He gave us a slightly younger and softer Darcy – we would really buy that he wasn’t (only) prejudiced, he was also super shy. He may not have jumped into a lake, but he did walk through the pouring rain (luckily for us, without an umbrella), and then had that beautiful stroll through the morning fog – and both scenes did wonders to endear him to the audience (and us).

Elliot Cowan in ‘Lost in Austen’ (2008)


Cowan played the brooding and meddling Darcy in this twisted take on Pride and Prejudice, navigating the disasters that ensued when a modern-day girl found herself inside the novel. This incredibly meta version of Pride and Prejudice only became more so when Cowan’s Darcy was encouraged into a lake to recreate the scene made famous by Firth’s Darcy, in his 1995 adaptation. Not that we disliked this, in fact we’d be highly encouraging of all future Darcys recreating this scene. For, you know, reasons.

Daniel Gordh in ‘The Lizzie Bennet Diaries’ (2012-2013)


The newest entrance to the Darcy Club is a hipster’s dream come true. Gordh appears in the web series opposite Ashley Clements, adorned in all the bowties and suspenders we could want. His Darcy is exceedingly awkward and almost cripplingly shy. Of course it’s difficult to judge a Darcy who hasn’t had his ‘jump in the lake/walk through the fog/propose in the rain’ moment yet, but judging from the hysteria sparked by his first appearance in Darcy Day, he’s well on his way to becoming many fans’ favorite.

Vote for your favorite Darcy

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Bonnie remains one of very few non-blood suckers on The Vampire Diaries, but she has still made her way through the supernatural catalog. We’re taking a look at her best, and worst, supernatural identities.

You may think that one of the Salvatore brothers has the most diverse life experiences amongst The Vampire Diaries characters, since they’re each older than the rest of the characters combined, but you’d be wrong! It’s actually the mortal Bonnie Bennett that is really getting the full look at what this life (and death) has to offer. From human, to witch, to anchor, to more than her fair share of deaths, she’s tried on almost every supernatural hat available.

No matter what supernatural box she’s checking on her driver’s license at any given time, Bonnie is an integral part of the Mystic Falls crew, and has saved the lives of our other heroes countless times! She is a great friend, and girlfriend, and can usually be counted on for a witty remark. That being said, she has definitely gone through her ups and downs, and some of her supernatural titles have fit her way better than others. We’ve ranked all of Bonnie’s supernatural identities, from the ones she could stick with, to the ones that she should never, ever go back to.

1. Witch — season 1 to early season 4, mid season 6 to late season 7

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Of course, Bonnie’s best role is the one she was born to play. Ever since she learned she was a witch, she has only grown stronger in her powers and better at wielding them. Salvatore and co. truly would be nowhere without her magic, which is evidenced by the number of times “Call Bonnie!” is yelled at the TV screen when the gang is in trouble on The Vampire Diaries (it can’t just be me).

Bonnie is at her strongest and happiest when she is a witch, but that’s not the only reason we’ve chosen this as her best supernatural identity. Bonnie Bennett’s witchiness has always been one of the coolest parts of The Vampire Diaries mythology, and has led to some of the most exciting and entertaining storylines on the show.

2. Human — her life before ‘The Vampire Diaries’

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When we first met the young Bonnie Bennett, she was just beginning her deep dive into the magical realm. She had discovered that her ancestors were from Salem, and that the women in her family were supposedly witches, but she still thought she was just some sort of psychic.

Before she had even heard of a Bennett witch, she was just a normal, happy, high school student, whose only concern was figuring out who the new cute boy in school was! Her powers definitely helped her come into a strength that she hadn’t known before, and gave her endless opportunities to save the people that she loves, but they’ve also led her into a lot of darkness. Just because we imagine her as being much less burdened as a human, we’ve ranked this one pretty high!

3. The Anchor — mid to late season 5

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The anchor to the other side was perhaps Bonnie’s strangest supernatural title, and that’s really saying something. Bonnie had to endure a lot of pain during her time as the anchor, but after an extended period of being dead, she was just happy to talk to people that weren’t Jeremy again (we’d get sick of all that teen angst, too).

Her ability to interact with the dead supernatural beings allowed us some amazing glimpses of characters that we had loved and lost, and it was also interesting to explore Bonnie’s character without her magical abilities. Even though we’re still angry that she didn’t realize earlier that Katherine wasn’t dead, we’re putting this one among the best of Bonnie’s supernatural identities for its uniqueness.

4. The Huntress — late season 7 to undetermined

the vampire diaries, bonnie bennett

This one goes in the middle because we’re still not quite sure what to expect from it, but we’re really excited for it! Rayna got a bad reputation because she was trying to kill everyone we cared about on The Vampire Diaries, but her mythology was interesting and it’ll be cool to see Bonnie try to figure it out.

Her relationships with literally everyone she knows will surely be tested when she attempts to kill them, but it’s nothing Miss Bennett can’t work through. On top of all the cool huntress stuff that we saw in Rayna, Bonnie will be bringing her magic to the table as well, which will make things even more entertaining.

5. Dead — late season 4 to mid season 5

the vampire diaries, bonnie bennett

You may think this one should be at the bottom of the list, but in our opinion, Bonnie has faced some things that were much darker than death. That’s especially true because Bonnie looked pretty damn good for a corpse, as evidenced by the above picture of her in this state. We still got to see Bonnie on The Vampire Diaries through Jeremy’s eyes, since he gained the power of seeing ghosts the first time Bonnie brought him back to life. You know what they say: the couple that resurrects together, stays together.

Strangely, Bonnie’s awkward dead phase wasn’t the most hopeless that we’ve seen her. She died for something that she believed in, and mostly remained optimistic that she would get to come back, somehow. Also, Bonnie’s death was kept from the bottom of the list because we got Bonnie’s funeral during this time, which is still one of the most beautiful scenes ever on The Vampire Diaries.

6. Expressionist — season 4

the vampire diaries, bonnie bennett

This is the term we’re using for the time that Bonnie was under the influence of the magic known as “expression.” When creepy Professor Shane helped/forced her to tap into this magic after she had lost her powers, Bonnie made some of the worst decisions that she ever has on The Vampire Diaries.

If anybody is a moral compass on the show, it’s Bonnie. She is always trying to help her friends, and do the right thing, even if it leads to her death (and it seems like it usually does). She made many questionable choices and participated in some very dark events during her time using expression.

7. Citizen of 1994, population: 3 — early to mid season 6

the vampire diaries, bonnie bennett

So yes, technically, she was dead in 1994, too, but it was such a different death experience that we thought it deserved a separate category. Sure, it was all fun and vampire pancakes when Damon was there, but things got pretty depressing for BonBon after he returned to the land of the living.

We thought things were bad for her when she was being used by the sadistic siphon, Kai, but things got much worse when the extreme loneliness and hopelessness set in. The days leading up to Bonnie’s eventual rescue were by far her darkest on the series, and it was extremely difficult to watch her go through that much pain.

What was Bonnie’s best supernatural identity on ‘The Vampire Diaries’?

Your number is up. It’s time you started watching Person of Interest.

Person of Interest season 5, the show’s final season, premieres tonight at 10:00 p.m. on CBS. It’s hard to imagine why CBS, a network with a flare for running procedurals well into double digit seasons, is not paying attention to Person of Interest. First, the episode order was cut, then months of radio silence on when the show would fit into CBS’s calendar. Finally, word emerged that the show’s final season would air two episodes per week and disappear from CBS’s lineup as quickly as possible. The behind the scenes network drama should not deter from Person of Interest’s growth from standard case-of-the-week procedural to serialized ASI war drama that, at its core, asks a particularly pertinent question, “How okay are we with being watched?”

Person of Interest premiered pre-Snowden. Why is that important? For those unfamiliar with the show, the opening title sequence begins with, “You are being watched. The government has a secret system, a machine that spies on you every hour of everyday.” Coming into the show today a new viewer would think, “Uh, duh!” But at the time of Person of Interest’s premiere the idea that the government was making use of the nation’s surveillance systems and listening in on calls to prevent terrorist acts was a cloudy idea. Something that might be happening, but probably would not affect our lives. Enter Person of Interest to unpack the “what if” scenario with the tale of ASI, or artificial super intelligence, and what that technology could be capable of placed in the right hands.

Person of Interest season 5 finch numbers

The ASI, or as its creator Harold Finch (Lost‘s Michael Emerson) prefers to refer to it, The Machine, is a super system that learns patterns in people’s behaviors. Its objective is to seek out potential danger and identify the perpetrators to the authorities. Finch, way back in 2006, sold the machine to the government to do just that. But when he learned that the government would assess and deploy prevention tactics only to stop major crimes and acts of terror, Finch created a back door and took the cases considered “irrelevant” into his own hands. Enter John Reese, a former CIA operative. Finch works with the brains of the operations, Reese provides the muscle.

Say hello to the perfect procedural ingredients. Each week The Machine would provide a new number (the social security number of a person who was either in danger or about to cause harm to someone else), Reese and Finch work to identify the person through surveillance and electronic records, the NYPD contacts provide assistance in acquiring case histories and diverting police vehicles, and bing, bang, boom by episode’s end the photo pinned on the wall would be taken down. That is, however, until season 3. Lurking in the background of seasons 1 and 2 were the big mob bosses of the five boroughs. They provided assistance or disruption time and again with Carl Elias heading up the organized crime unit steering the ship and contributed to the long form stories Person of Interest wove into the mix.

Person of Interest season 5 root finch

But by season 3, when a rival ASI began to take on a life of its own, so did the long form story. Numbers, belonging to victims and perpetrators still trickled out here and there, but a larger war began pushing them out of the limelight. And honestly, the show became better for it. Other procedurals across the networks tend to operate in the same way season 1 and 2 unfolded. Elementary reserves their B storyline for planting seeds across a season in order to open up three episodes at the end to a serialized story. NCIS and all its spinoffs, also tell narratives across episodes, typically focusing on one or two characters. Person of Interest decidedly turned the show on its head, even changing the opening credits to reflect a greater power taking over their world. Another being inside the show was here to shake things up and the only way to tell its story was to let Samaritan win for a while.

Samaritan, the rival AI built from the scraps of work Harold Finch previously discarded, brought with it a new method of storytelling. In season 3 Person of Interest slowly shifted to a more serialized show, ending a season-long battle against an organization known as Vigilance. Fighting for the right to electronic privacy, Vigilance’s visual leader, played brilliantly by pre-Hamilton superstar Leslie Odom Jr., took the show from Number of the Week into uncharted territory, a serialized drama sci-fi that tackles a war between the underdog ASI – The Machine – against the Super Intelligence and big bad – Samaritan. And that is where season 4 subsequently continued. Once Samaritan went live, there was no kill switch.

Person of Interest season 5 gang

So, why should you watch Person of Interest now? Even though CBS sees Person of Interest as an Irrelevant, I see it as being one of the most “Relevant” shows on television. Across the seasons there are episodes that I feel comfortable enough calling some of the best I’ve seen on TV. Not only is the topic eerily relevant to the current technological climate, but the show has some of the strongest actors and performances week in and week out. “The Devil’s Share,” is one of the best explorations of grief and revenge. Watch the cold open to the episode below, but be warned that it does reveal a major character’s death. The slow burn of the more personal stories and skeletons lurking in Reese, Finch, Shaw, and Root’s closet makes for some of the most compelling narratives on TV.

Seeing as the premiere picks up moments after the conclusion of the season 4 finale, I highly recommended that you load up “YHWY” on Netflix before heading into “B.S.O.D.” Person of Interest is certainly worth adding to your TV lexicon, but if you do not have time for every single case, there is an incredible guide that will catch you up without watching all 90 episodes.

The first few episodes of this season (I have seen four) maintain the feel of the previous seasons while also kicking off the final chapter in Person of Interest‘s story.

Watch Person of Interest season 5, episode 1, “B.S.O.D.” tonight at 10:00 p.m. ET on CBS.

On May 2, 2016, J.K. Rowling commemorated the anniversary of the Battle of Hogwarts by apologizing for killing Lupin, and telling us that the Grim Reaper almost chose Arthur instead.

Father figures have always been an important aspect of the Harry Potter series, and Rowling always knew that a few of them (RIP Sirius, Dumbledore, Lupin) would have to be killed during the Chosen One’s seven-year journey. Interestingly, Rowling revealed this week that Lupin could’ve been alive today if it weren’t for the fact that Arthur Weasley made it through Order of the Phoenix. As the author explains it:

This is a hard pill to swallow, and the first time we’re explicitly hearing that Arthur living meant Lupin dying. So, we thought we should debate this topic. Did J.K. Rowling make the right choice when she chose to kill Remus Lupin over Arthur Weasley? We asked two of our writers to each defend a position.

Selina: Yes, killing Lupin was the right choice

arthur-weasley-and-harry-potter

Let’s journey back in time. The year is 2003, and you’ve been up for 72 hours straight, ploughing through the overwhelmingly long Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix. It’s been a bumpy ride, Harry’s fifth year being decidedly unpleasant, and you’re emotionally exhausted. Then you get to the Department of Mysteries, and here we are: Sirius is dead. Just like that, the man who could have been Harry’s adoptive father, his way out of the hellish Dursley household, is gone.

Now imagine you going through all that, except Arthur Weasley had also died in the middle of the book. You wouldn’t have been able to take it.

Ultimately we might argue that J.K. Rowling should just have kept them both alive, but at the end of the day, it was important for her to kill off one of the series’ two fathers, to achieve the symmetry of leaving a child without its parent(s) like Harry had been.

Not only did killing both Lupin and Tonks leave baby Teddy an orphan, perfectly mirroring Harry’s own experience, but it was also — arguably — an act of mercy to kill Lupin rather than Arthur. Teddy Lupin would still get to grow up with people who loved him, knowing that his parents died heroes, while Harry and the Weasleys (who’d already lost Fred) would get to keep their family intact. Considering the lengths J.K. Rowling went to to effectively end Harry’s childhood (killing Sirius, Dumbledore, and Hedwig), leaving both Weasley parents alive allowed us to end the series on a hopeful note. The parents don’t always have to die in order for the children to grow up.

I’m not glad that Lupin died. But if the choice was between him and Arthur, I think Jo made the right call. Knowing that Harry and his friends could still visit the Burrow after the Battle of Hogwarts — and that even if the place was a lot less bright without Fred, it still felt like a safe, loving home — is a great comfort, especially knowing how much Harry valued the Weasleys and the surrogate family they formed around him.

Laura: Killing Lupin was wrong, she sacrificed the last of the Marauders and the keys to the past

lupin-and-harry-potter

Let’s revise the top of this article, shall we? His name is Remus Lupin, not just Lupin, the best Defense Against the Dark Arts teacher that Harry and company ever had. Without Remus Lupin the trio would have been dead: no Expecto Patronum, no recognizing Bogarts, no practical experience with Grindylows, Red Caps, or Hinkypunks. Harry and every student in his year was left with a substandard skill set thanks to Quirrell and Lockhart. Without question, Remus Lupin laid the groundwork for the success that was later achieved by Dumbledore’s Army. He made up for lost time, in a positive and uplifting manner, and was the friendly guidance the students needed.

This week is National Teacher Appreciation Week, and what better fictional teacher to appreciate than Remus Lupin. He never underestimated his students, he challenged them to do more than they ever thought possible. He didn’t just spend time with shining stars like Hermione, but he made time for people that no one else cared to. Would Neville Longbottom have ever had the confidence to succeed in leading Hogwarts without Harry, Ron, and Hermione without Remus Lupin having taken a personal interest? Every other teacher wrote Neville off as either incompetent, a fool, or both.

The one thing Remus Lupin provided to Harry that Arthur Wesley couldn’t was insight into Harry’s past. Don’t get me wrong, I’m not hating on Arthur, but it’s not a role Arthur could ever fill. Remus Lupin could talk about James and Lily from first-hand experience: funny stories, hopes, sadness, all of it. Harry was left with no one to fill that role. There is an irreplaceable void in Harry’s life thanks to Remus’ death. Harry needed Remus.

Had Arthur died it would have been tragic, but his tightly bonded family would have had each other. His children were well grounded, knew who they were, and were ready to face the world. Arthur had done an amazing job raising them along with Molly. Remus didn’t have the chance to reach his fullest potential. Had Remus lived, he and Harry would have been new parents at relatively the same time. They would have progressed from a teacher/student relationship to just being friends. They would have watched their boys grow up together and been there for each other as parents in the post-war world.

Now it’s your turn! Vote in our poll and hit the comments to debate it