While many people may be purchasing the iPhone 5 for the simple fact of showing it off, there are several people left in the world who are purchasing it for a different reason: it just works.

Before I go on, I want to give full disclosure about the Apple products I own. Take a big breath, John. Ready? iPhone 4S (soon to be 5), iPad (first generation), MacBook Pro, iPod nano (third generation) and most recently, Apple TV. Yes, I’m an Apple fanboy. But there’s a reason for it beyond “it’s cool.”

In 2005 when my Gateway computer crashed and burned itself up via its power adapter at the same time, I was left helpless and deflated about what I would do to replace it. I was in the middle of my second semester of college and I desperately needed just something. Desperate for a computer of some sort, I saw a flyer at my university of someone selling their Apple iBook G4 (for you young’ens, before the iBook store an iBook was the predecessor to the MacBook). Low and behold, seven years later I’m on my third Mac and haven’t had a single solitary issue with any of them. They’ve just worked!

So, in 2007, two years into my overwhelming joy of not having to send my computer back to Gateway three times a year for a replacement hard drive, motherboard or AC adapter, the iPhone was announced and my interest piqued. I purchased the first iPhone in 2007, saw how it “talked” to my Mac and turned using a smart phone into a productive, everyday tool, and I never looked back!

Click here for all the details about the iPhone 5.

Each year since, I have upgraded to the newest model iPhone only because they have always had vast improvements over the other (though that argument seems to be less solid in recent years, admittedly). And each year, I’m happier with the way my phone works than ever before.

So isn’t that enough? Can’t I just be happy with my Apple products and be a loyal fan because…they just work? I bought the new iPhone based on my previous experiences with them – not because I need every Apple product that comes out (we all know someone like that). Arguing about the price of iPhones and why someone should or shouldn’t get one has almost become as much of a conversation with people as the latest features – even with the option to get one for free through all U.S. carriers.

At the end of the day my Apple purchases are based on experience. I’ve switched from Windows to a Mac out of desperation with huge success and have switched from previous models of smart phones to iPhone with even bigger success. And until Apple’s software gets buggy or freezes (Blackberry Storm anyone?), or the iPhone turns into a Zach Morris phone again, I have come to realize that my loyalty to the iPhone has nothing to do with flaunting a shiny Apple logo (which I cover up with a case anyway), it has to do with the simple concept that any electronic consumer wants: it just works.

Click here to check out the top 8 features you should know about the newly released iOS 6.

Did you buy the new iPhone 5 this week? Are you a long-time iPhone user? Leave your thoughts in the comments below!

We finally have the title of the next entry in the Star Wars saga. But just what, or who, does The Last Jedi refer to?

It has been a long time coming, but we now know the title of Episode VIII. The somewhat ominous name for the film is accompanied by a red, rather than yellow logo, which doesn’t exactly bode well for our heroes. But, like it or not, The Last Jedi is here — and we’re going to break down what it could mean.

But first, we’re going to look at a little Star Wars history, and where we’ve seen a red logo, as well as the title The Last Jedi, before.

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We finally have the title of the next entry in the Star Wars saga. But just what, or who, does The Last Jedi refer to?

It has been a long time coming, but we now know the title of Episode VIII. The somewhat ominous name for the film is accompanied by a red, rather than yellow logo, which doesn’t exactly bode well for our heroes. But, like it or not, The Last Jedi is here — and we’re going to break down what it could mean.

But first, we’re going to look at a little Star Wars history, and where we’ve seen a red logo, as well as the title The Last Jedi, before.

The Last Jedi has been used twice as a title in the Star Wars universe. Yes, twice. You may have seen several references made over on Twitter to the 49th issue in the Star Wars comic series, titled The Last Jedi. One, most notably, by Pablo Hidalgo — a creative executive of the Lucasfilm Story Group.

It is unlikely that we will see any reference back to the comic within the central plot itself, but it could be nice to see a more subtle hat-tip to one of the origins of the title.

The Last Jedi has also been used as a title for a Star Wars novel, now part of Legends, post-Disney’s acquisition of Lucasfilm. The novel was a standalone follow-up to the Coruscant Nights series, centered around Jax Pavan, the last publicly known Jedi in the wake of Order 66. Much in the same vein as the aforementioned comic, it is unlikely that the novel will inform the story of Episode VIII, but — again — it could be interesting to hear a reference to Jax, somewhere over the course of the film.

As for the logo, there have also been several instances where red has either been used, or intended to be used, in the place of the now-classic yellow.

During the Clone Wars series, the logo was changed to red to signify the return of Darth Maul — the presumed-dead Dathomirian villain of Episode I. Could the use of red in the logo for The Last Jedi suggest the return of the Sith, and ‘balance’ to the Force? Though Kylo Ren is, unquestionably, on the Dark Side, there is no reference to his status as a Sith — or, indeed, that there are any within the First Order itself.

Of course, the red logo could simply be a reference to the original title and design for Return of the Jedi. Several teasers were created and posters printed with an ominous red logo, and the title Revenge of the Jedi, prior to Lucas reverting to Return instead. On some promotional material, Return of the Jedi also had red in its logo, as did Revenge of the Sith. With a darker tone being suggested by several cast members, will The Last Jedi’s logo change reinforce that?

There’s only one way to find out. Let’s break down exactly what The Last Jedi could mean.

Luke Skywalker is the last Jedi

The most obvious reading of The Last Jedi title is that it refers specifically to Luke Skywalker. He has, after all, been referred to as such multiple times across the Star Wars saga. In fact, the opening crawl to The Force Awakens set the scene for the First Order’s single-minded mission to hunt down and destroy Luke — and with him the last vestige of the Jedi Order.

But The Force Awakens certainly wasn’t the first time we’d heard the phrase “last Jedi” in relation to Luke Skywalker. For that, we need to look back to the Original Trilogy installment, Return of the Jedi, and Yoda’s final words to Luke.

‘When gone am I, the last of the Jedi will you be.’

Though Rey may have discovered her Force sensitivity during the course of The Force Awakens and traveled to Ahch-To in order to convince Luke to return, the fact still remains that she is not yet a Jedi. Not only that, but with Ben Solo’s fall and little reference made to any of Luke’s other students surviving the massacre at the hands of the Knights of Ren, it would stand to reason that Luke’s status as the last Jedi is solidly intact.

Rey is the last Jedi

We’ve heard several times over that The Last Jedi will be a far darker tale than its predecessor. And so, by the time the credits roll at the close of Episode VIII, could Rey inherit the title of last Jedi from Luke?

It wouldn’t be that much of a stretch, considering that Star Wars’ narrative has always worked cyclically. Fans have even remarked endlessly about the parallels between A New Hope and The Force Awakens. But as Han’s death at the hands of his son, Ben, mirrored Obi-Wan’s, so too could Luke’s potential death mirror Yoda’s from Return of the Jedi. It would be somewhat poetic — if heartbreaking to lose Luke so soon after Han.

Of course, Rey’s journey to Ahch-To and Luke doesn’t necessarily preclude that she might eventually become a Jedi herself. Speaking to MTV in 2016, Ridley remarked, “I don’t know if I am a Jedi. I don’t think I am. We’ve had this debate as to whether Leia is because she uses her Force powers. Just because she’s not like, ‘Oh I’m going on an adventure’ like Luke doesn’t make her any less Forceful.”

Should Rey refuse to train as a Jedi, and utilize her Force sensitivity in other ways — as we have seen with several other characters, including the Bendu from Star Wars Rebels — we could see the definitive end of the Jedi as we know them with Luke’s death, whenever that might occur.

Amongst certain circles of fan theorists, there is also one that Rey herself could fall to the Dark Side — another signifier for the end of the Jedi, should that occur. It’s not a theory that I’m particularly fond of, but I certainly won’t discredit it, as it is a fairly persistent one. And that red logo is definitely ominous…

There are multiple last Jedi

There’s nothing to suggest that the Jedi referenced in Episode VIII‘s title is singular. Jedi can, after all, refer to both a person and a group.

The Last Jedi could see the completion of Rey’s training with Luke, and the two return side-by-side, to fight equally as Jedi. It would certainly be the sort of sneaky word-play that Star Wars has become known for, but could there be more to it?

Per The Force Awakens, we know that Ben Solo has, and continues to struggle with, the call to the light inside him. Though Han Solo’s death at his hands would seem to suggest that his fall to the Dark Side is complete, and any ties remaining to the light severed, is that truly the case?

Could The Last Jedi see Ben, much like his grandfather before him, return to the light to fight alongside Rey and Luke, making all three the last of the Jedi?

Battle with the Knights of Ren

As referenced during the earlier segment focusing on Luke, we already know there was a massacre at the hands of the Knights of Ren, resulting in Luke becoming the last Jedi once more. But between the events of Return of the Jedi and The Force Awakens, Luke was by no means the last.

Is it possible that The Last Jedi could refer to this massacre? We caught a glimpse of, what we assume, was the moment the massacre occurred — when Rey took Luke’s lightsaber at Maz Kanata’s castle. Could we be privy to a flashback sequence at some point over the course of Episode VIII, revealing the exact details of Ben Solo’s fall, and the circumstances surrounding the death of Luke’s students?

Who — or what — do you think ‘The Last Jedi’ refers to?

‘The Last Jedi’ is scheduled for release December 15, 2017

When the world is a place of fear and hatred, stories have always provided an easy escape. But they serve an even greater purpose than that.

Our media, including its fictional content, exists to analyze and criticize society. X-Men was born out of the civil rights movement and LGBTQ+ fans have flocked to the franchise partly as they recognize the mutant concept as relatable to their struggle. In the turning points of history, stories take on a greater importance than ever before.

The media is immensely powerful. The clamor to make Elsa gay is the direct result of people recognizing how powerful that would be for children. Star Wars faced a backlash from those who could not bear the thought of a woman and two men of color getting such significant roles in the galactic story.

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When the world is a place of fear and hatred, stories have always provided an easy escape. But they serve an even greater purpose than that.

Our media, including its fictional content, exists to analyze and criticize society. X-Men was born out of the civil rights movement and LGBTQ+ fans have flocked to the franchise partly as they recognize the mutant concept as relatable to their struggle. In the turning points of history, stories take on a greater importance than ever before.

The media is immensely powerful. The clamor to make Elsa gay is the direct result of people recognizing how powerful that would be for children. Star Wars faced a backlash from those who could not bear the thought of a woman and two men of color getting such significant roles in the galactic story.

However, now possibly more than ever before, we also need to make sure that the content that is churned out into the world is the best it can be. Our arguments have become increasingly binary in all things. We must take lessons from the recent bitter presidential race; Clinton lost so much support because she was tarred as the “lesser evil.”

Clinton was not in the same realm of evil as Trump. There was no comparison but because of her highly questionable stances on certain issues, the Democrats felt unable to say that she was flawed but she was also the best choice. Instead of being able to accept nuance, the narrative is of good vs evil and so when one side might not be that perfect, silence ensues and evil is allowed to dominate the debate.

The same warnings are present whenever it comes to reviewing any content. We must be able to say that something was good but can do better in other aspects. Such an argument does not equal hatred. We need to seek the best content possible by celebrating what works, and challenging what doesn’t. X-Men has a fantastic concept, but when white actors are constantly cast in roles designed for people of color then that must be criticized. Rowling is brilliant at delivering metaphors on the dangers of racism, but how many people of color ever feature in her stories?

In fan culture, we love hard. It’s one of the best aspects of fandom but when it risks cutting us off from asking for better content then there’s an issue. It’s particularly an issue whenever it comes to specific characters. We tend to talk of them in one dimensional terms, so if we don’t like them it’s taken that we mean that they have no value in the wider story. Yet, this is very rarely the case.

Draco Malfoy had an absurdly huge fan base but he was never a good guy, and saying this does not mean that there is no value to him. Malfoy was fantastic to the story but he was also arrogant, bigoted and selfish. He had good moments, such as trying to save his friend, but that’s the point; people are complex and that’s the beauty of characters. Even Rowling has said she doesn’t understand the love for Draco, but the love for him says more about the way we consume media than anything else.

The Joker is one of the most fascinating characters ever created and I love to watch/read him. I also hate him. He’s one of my favorites and I never want his story to stop but this is not a good person where there is anything redeemable. Our favorites don’t have to be good guys, they don’t even need us to defend them, and that’s okay. The problem comes when we do try to justify toxic behavior, particularly in an era that is now celebrating toxic masculinity. Our favorites are allowed to be horror shows and that’s why stories exist – to safely explore that concept. We can absolutely love the villains as long as we recognize them for that.

Writers love their characters being pulled apart too. They love debate, they love people accepting the shades of grey and the badness in them. They don’t want a perfect or idealized character. The fact is, few heroes are ever worthy of complete devotion. Lost’s John Locke may have been right about the island, but how many people did he kill to get there? Hermione was an inspiration to so many women but when she tried to free house elves, it was done without their consent and against their wishes.

Writers appreciate when we take the time to work out what that character means and how they reflect in the world we’re living in. We can be better than Harley in “Mad Love,” where she’s been broken so many times by Joker but still romanticizes him because he sends her a rose. It’s a blunt message but it’s reflective of media today. We can enjoy the spectacle but we cannot justify the bad, whether that’s poor character choices made by good people or just generally bad writing.

We need a more open attitude than we’ve ever had with analyzing fandoms. It’s thanks to reviews that the horrendously creepy Passengers tanked. Using our voices works, and that’s why Hollywood is fighting Trump tooth and nail. Fans and journalists can participate too. We’re not always going to agree but we can work towards the same goal of demanding better content, and not just taking the content we are given at face value.

Let’s talk about how the zombie apocalypse in Fear The Walking Dead is relevant today while asking that the writers stop killing off everyone but the one white family. We can talk about the importance of Dumbledore being gay while asking for answers about Depp’s casting. In such a creative industry, the audience never should have to settle for whatever is offered.

Do you agree fans need to demand better content from their fandoms?

Some awesome celebrities turned out today to support the Women’s March on Washington movement, in order to send a strong message to the Trump administration that women’s rights are human rights!

Massive crowds all over the world today are taking part in the Women’s March to send a message about women’s rights. Here at Hypable we give a big shout out to all of those taking a stand today. To show that you’re not alone in this fight, here’s a look at some of the celebrities who were among the estimated four million marchers who showed up to support you in D.C. and all over the world.

Emma Watson and Bonnie Wright

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Some awesome celebrities turned out today to support the Women’s March on Washington movement, in order to send a strong message to the Trump administration that women’s rights are human rights!

Massive crowds all over the world today are taking part in the Women’s March to send a message about women’s rights. Here at Hypable we give a big shout out to all of those taking a stand today. To show that you’re not alone in this fight, here’s a look at some of the celebrities who were among the estimated four million marchers who showed up to support you in D.C. and all over the world.

Emma Watson and Bonnie Wright

Kristen Stewart

Charlize Theron

Madonna

Nick Offerman

Sir Ian McKellen

Candice King, Julie Plec and Kayla Ewell

Mindy Kaling

A photo posted by Mindy Kaling (@mindykaling) on

Darren Criss and Nick Lang

Melissa Benoist

💪#womensmarchonwashington

A photo posted by Melissa Benoist (@melissabenoist) on

Misha Collins

#womansmarch Jacksonville, FL. Fight on!

A photo posted by Misha Collins (@misha) on

Aja Naomi King and Alfred Enoch

Resistance. Respect. #womensmarch 👊🏾

A photo posted by Aja King (@ajanaomi_king) on

Lin-Manuel Miranda

Joss Whedon

Edgar Wright

Miley Cyrus

Ariana Grande

today filled my heart with so much hope !! got to meet many beautiful, passionate people and march alongside my loved ones. the sun came out for us. we are so much stronger and louder than hatred, ignorance, sexism, racism, agism, homophobia, transphobia, body shaming, slut shaming, prejudice, discrimination of all kinds, patriarchal conditioning and the backwards expectations of what a woman should be! I'm so proud of / inspired by everyone who marched today and thankful that there are so many people on this planet currently celebrating how brilliant and magical women truly are! let's keep our voices loud, passionate & peaceful! let's continue being strong for each other and to build each other up! let us stay connected to our divinity. 🌸♡🌌

A photo posted by Ariana Grande (@arianagrande) on

John Legend

#WomensMarch

A photo posted by John Legend (@johnlegend) on

Chrissy Teigen and America Ferrara

Dame Helen Mirren

Gillian Anderson

Bryan Fuller

Neil Gaiman

Kerry Washington with Natalie Portman

… and with Laverne Cox

Ben Barnes

Amy Schumer and Uzo Aduba

A photo posted by @amyschumer on

Gina Rodriguez

Carlos Valdes, Arthur Darvill, Danielle Panabaker, Caity Lotz and Keiynan Lonsdale

Maggie and Jake Gyllenhaal

Kevin McHale

Chris Colfer

Scarlett Johansson

Blake Lively

Yoko Ono and Whoopi Goldberg

Jessica Chastain

Alicia Keys and Janelle Monae

Katy Perry

Zendaya

That's right…

A photo posted by Zendaya (@zendaya) on

Troye Sivan

Willow Smith

Mark Ruffalo

Yip. Well said. Borrowed sign from @dorisfullgrabe design by @dirtybandits #womensmarch Nyc

A photo posted by Mark Ruffalo (@markruffalo) on

Paul Bettany

Eddie Izzard

Stephen Colbert

Did you turn out to support the Women’s March?