Lin-Manuel Miranda takes his final bow for his iconic, self-created turn as Alexander Hamilton tonight. To say farewell (for now) to the brilliant writer, Hypable’s Hamilton-obsessed staff share what particular parts of Lin’s legacy we’re most thankful for.

Dear Lin Miranda, what to say to you?

It’s going to be, in your own words, a bit of a day. Tonight in your final act two, when you appeal to your president one last time, Alexander Hamilton’s unwillingness to accept George Washington’s stepping down will echo the sentiments reaching you from across the world in regards to your own exit from your magnum opus. Of course, because you’re you, you’ve already provided us the answer and the antidote in Washington’s own response. We get it. For Hamilton to stand on its own two feet, just like the fledgling America, it needs to prove it can outlive the shadow cast by one exemplary figure. A Broadway show cannot and should not be defined by its original cast if it is to truly succeed and spread and grow and run forever.

But it doesn’t mean it doesn’t hurt like hell. Your own inclusive and infectious energy means that when you have the feels, we have the feels. Tonight, your cast and crew will say happy trails to Pippa, to Leslie and to you — our dear Mr. Hamilton. We know how bittersweet it’s going to be. As we reflect today on the Hamilton phenomenon of the past year and a half, there’s a few things we’d like to thank you for.

For your honesty

Hamilton

Lin, I have been following you since the days of In The Heights, and could thank you for many things. I could thank you for your eloquence, your humor, your ability to turn a rhyme. I could thank you for your ceaseless effort, your imagination, and your crafting of wonder. I could thank you for your amazing hair.

But what I think I most deeply appreciate is your honesty. There is potent truth sizzling beneath (and sometimes on the surface of) every line in Hamilton — and frankly, pretty much everything I’ve heard you say. There is a Kaballistic saying that words spoken from the heart reach the heart; this is what you do, with words sweetened and salted with truth, and this is the source of my most powerful gratitude. With humor, with rhyme, with harmony, and with with heart, you present the essence of the Real… and the world will never be the same. Thank you.

— Michal Schick

For your affirmations

Hamilton Orlando Lin-Manuel Miranda Tonys

I haven’t seen Hamilton. I haven’t listened to the soundtrack (because I’d rather see it live first). I don’t get any of the Hamilton jokes except for #YAYHAMLET.

But I do follow you on Twitter. And you’re the most inspiring and engaging person I follow.

Most mornings, you’ll tweet a hello to your followers. Most evenings, you’ll do the same thing (you know this — you’re you). Each of these greetings and farewells are beautiful, inspirational, and make us want to think differently about the world.

Thank you for the daily inspiration, Lin. As I see in your mentions, tens of thousands of people enjoy your unrelenting messages of hope, love, and strength.

— Andrew Sims

For our friendships

Hamilton-Feature

There was a brief amount of time where Hamilton existed only in the lives of those lucky enough to see it on the stage. One week prior to the soundtrack’s release, I was fortunate enough to win the live Ham4Ham lottery and experience the show for the first time on stage next to fellow Hypable writer Karen and across the orchestra stalls from Natalie. Even before the curtain rose, Karen, Natalie, and myself had plenty of great stories from waiting in line for the lottery (where I learned the identity of the Winter Soldier), to witnessing a Ham4Ham before they were a weekly sensation, to hearing the crowd cheer for the winners of the lottery even if it wasn’t their name that was pulled. There was a sense of community among strangers that I had not witnessed in a very long time.

Little did I know that that was just the tip of the iceberg. Once the soundtrack became available to the world, a new kinship, an “in-crowd” was created. Within Hypable an insular kinship flourished. Twitter conversations looped sparked from lyric exchange blossomed into a Hype special. Listeners and fans, particularly on ReWatchable, began to dominate the conversation, leading to the masterpiece Ariana created where she spun the lyrics of “Helpless” to reflect the drama unfolding onBuffy. From being in the theater and hearing Karen audibly gasp after Daveed Diggs finished rapping on stage to quoting “One Last Time” and “My Shot” in everyday conversation, knowing that someone out there will nod and smile in recognition as part of the Hamilton takeover is extraordinary.

Lin, as you prepare to step down as Alexander Hamilton, I’m grateful that I was touched by the ripple that formed from this particular drop of your incredible talent. Thanks for giving my friends and I something to bond more deeply over, even if it leads to a few embarrassing attempts to perform “Satisfied.”

— Brittany Lovely

For the fandom

Lin,

Being in fandom is a big part of who I am — the simple fact that I engage with media on a level that perhaps some others don’t is the most defining characteristic of my life. I expend a huge amount of energy in being a fan of things — it’s why I travel, it’s why I write, it’s why I have friends. The relationship between a fan and a creator has always been a delicate one — sometimes beautiful or stressful or both, but I don’t think I’ve ever seen someone field it better than you have. Not only are you producing life-altering, game-changing work, but you also understand how to make the fan experience surrounding that work enriching and enduring.

You’re everything a fan could ever want from a creator — so compassionate, so generous with your time, so earnest with your emotions, and you understand fan culture better than 95% of other creators out there — you share your own experiences of what it is to be overwhelmed and obsessed and immersed. It really shouldn’t be headline news that a creator actually cares about their own work — they should care about it more than anyone, surely! — but there’s often an odd distance present when writers discuss their work, a sense of removal, jadedness or even a bit of scorn or laughter towards fans who take it so seriously. A divide between those who create, and those who are fans, as if one could not bleed into the other. Approaching your writing as a workaholic or a perfectionist is one thing. Approaching it as a fan is another, and that’s rarer than it should be. We all know that you are unashamedly fannish, that you can’t help it, and the mere fact that you admit to crying when researching or writing your own characters is manna to all of us who have ever felt a little crazy for caring so much about stories or songs.

You’ve also perfected the balancing act of what parts of yourself to share and what you need to hold back, when to chime in and when to look away, in order to remain resilient in a fandom environment. Even your gentle but firm insistence that fandom upholds a standard of behavior is well-received — so many creators approach similar situations rather more indelicately which leads to unnecessary conflict, but you manage to invoke the empathy of your fans at every turn, even when it comes to setting boundaries or what you’re not able to give them. No matter how much people may project their feelings onto you, you’ve ultimately seemed to avoid the dehumanization that accompanies fame and fandom.

Most importantly, you encourage us, you value us and you love us. Your work may be raising the bar, but you’re gleefully challenging others to jump over it with you. Some geniuses have the unfortunate issue of shining so bright that they blind others. Your light shines on us and illuminates us too, instead of blotting us out. Your intellect is the type that doesn’t intimidate. It invites us in, makes us feel comfortable and we feel smarter and more inspired for being a part of your conversation. You seem to see the potential in every single person you engage with, you do not underestimate what any human being has to offer, and it isn’t just lip service – you put it into practice constantly.

Thank you, Old Man Miranda. For every post on Twitterico and Tumblrico, for every Ham4Ham, every meme, every t-shirt, every promise you keep, every way you find to share something special. For every time you turn your earnest eyes on something you love and we know that we are not alone in how we engage with the world. Thank you for getting us.

— Natalie Fisher

For empowering immigrants

Dear Lin,

I can’t pick a favorite Hamilton song to save my life, but I can tell you that there’s one line that consistently sends chills down my spine.

Interestingly enough, you’ve put it right in the opening number: “The ship is in the harbor now/ See if you can spot him/ Another immigrant coming up from the bottom…”

Today, I want to take a moment to thank you for this particular line in general. Why? Because it’s a line that reminds me that no matter how bleak the future may seem, the beauty of having been born in America is that I have the potential to rise up and be the best version of myself. It’s a gift that was granted to me by my fearless grandparents who chose to flee Mexico and put down new roots in California.

In an era where the word “immigrant” is consistently raked through the mud, I take comfort in the fact that in creating Hamilton, you’ve managed to shine a positive light not only on the word itself, but also on the people who come to this country to seek new opportunities.

Thank you for reminding us all that if given the chance, immigrants like Alexander Hamilton have the power to change the world for the better.

— Pamela Gocobachi

For unifying people of color

Hamilton Javier Munoz

Dear Lin-Manuel Miranda,

As a woman of color and a descendant of immigrants, I’ve always had a complicated relationship with the Founding Father narrative.

In school I learned that the Founding Fathers were rebels and geniuses. Free-thinkers full of contradictions. They set the world on fire, seemingly creating a lasting nation through sheer force of will. The world was waiting for them to fail, but they chose to push through and fight and write and scream and claw their way towards the completion of a country, bickering with each other the entire way there because they understood that the stakes were so incredibly high.

They stood for this idea that I so desperately wanted to believe: that anything in this country is possible if you only have the tenacity and brilliance to make it happen. I felt a kinship to their kind of hopeless idealism. And yet, sitting in class with my history book, a part of me also understood that there was an inherent separation between the founding of my country and me.

As a Mexican-American, the books in school tell me I am either the villain or the footnote in my own history. As a woman of color, I understand that regardless of my own abilities, the Founding Fathers would have never made space for me in the “the room where it happens.” I’m forced to recognize that our American history is fraught with both pride and terror, and that just as these men fought for their freedom, they also denied the most basic rights to others. This country has given my family so much, and for that I am grateful. But I am also forced to acknowledge that when the Founding Fathers were fighting for freedom, they didn’t know they were fighting for me.

But history belongs to those who write it, and with Hamilton, you’ve created a narrative where we can not only belong to our country’s founding as people of color, but unite under an umbrella of pride. That incessant struggle to prove one’s own self-worth is at the heart of the Founding Father narrative, and with Hamilton, it becomes a parallel to the struggle that people of color go through living in a country that is still dealing with its own issues regarding race.

You’ve helped us take back our history, because while they didn’t value us then, in casting our brown faces, you’re forcing them to see us now. Using our music, you’ve ensured they hear our voices. As people of color, we’re so often divided by what we look like and where we come from, but you’ve reminded us that we are similar in our struggles of oppression, and that we are stronger when we stand together. As you wave your Puerto Rican flag high, you somehow allow us the space to celebrate the beauty of our differences, while still uniting under the shared humanity of our American spirit.

Thank you.

— Ariana Quiñónez

Related: Watch Lin-Manuel Miranda take his final bow as Alexander Hamilton (and cut his hair)

Here are the 2017 Oscars winners and losers

8:25 pm EST, February 26, 2017

The 2017 Oscars took place Sunday night in Hollywood and found La La Land cleaning up with six wins. Here are the Academy Award winners!

ABC’s Jimmy Kimmel hosted the 2017 Oscars, which took place at the Dolby Theater. The event featured live performances of all five Oscar-nominated songs.

2017 Oscar winners list

Read full article

The 2017 Oscars took place Sunday night in Hollywood and found La La Land cleaning up with six wins. Here are the Academy Award winners!

ABC’s Jimmy Kimmel hosted the 2017 Oscars, which took place at the Dolby Theater. The event featured live performances of all five Oscar-nominated songs.

2017 Oscar winners list

Related: We asked our parents to describe the 2017 Oscar nominees

Below is a complete list of Oscar winner and losers.

2017 Oscar winner list

Note: The final winner of the night was originally announced to be La La Land, but the announcement was actually an error — Moonlight won Best Picture. Awkward.

Best Picture:
Arrival
Fences
Hacksaw Ridge
Hell or High Water
Hidden Figures
La La Land

Lion
Manchester By the Sea
Moonlight

Best Actress:
Isabelle Huppert – Elle
Ruth Negga – Loving
Natalie Portman – Jackie
Emma Stone – La La Land
Meryl Streep – Florence Foster Jenkins

Best Actor:
Casey Affleck – Manchester By the Sea
Andrew Garfield – Hacksaw Ridge
Ryan Gosling – La La Land
Viggo Mortensen – Captain Fantastic
Denzel Washington – Fences

Best Director:
Damien Chazelle – La La Land
Mel Gibson – Hacksaw Ridge
Barry Jenkins – Moonlight
Kenneth Lonergan – Manchester By the Sea
Denis Villeneuve – Arrival

Best Adapted Screenplay:
Arrival – Eric Heisserer
Fences – August Wilson
Hidden Figures – Allison Schroeder, Theodore Melfi
Lion – Luke Davies
Moonlight – Barry Jenkins

Best Original Screenplay:
20th Century Women – Mike Mills
Hell or High Water – Taylor Sheridan
La La Land – Damien Chazelle
The Lobster – Yorgos Lanthimos, Efthymis Filippou
Manchester By the Sea – Kenneth Lonergan

Best Original Song:
“Audition” – La La Land
“Can’t Stop the Feeling” – Trolls
“City of Stars” – La La Land
“The Empty Chair” – Jim: The James Foley Story
“How Far I’ll Go” – Moana

Best Score:
Jackie
La La Land
Lion
Moonlight
Passengers

Best Cinematography:
Bradford Young – Arrival
Linus Sandgren – La La Land
Grieg Fraser – Lion
James Laxton – Moonlight
Rodrigo Prieto – Silence

Best Live Action Short Film
Timecode
Sing
Silent Nights
Ennemis Interieurs
La Femme et le TGV

Best Documentary, Short Subject:
4.1 Miles
Extremis
Joe’s Violin
Watani: My Homeland
The White Helmets

Best Editing:
Arrival
Hacksaw Ridge
Hell or High Water
La La Land
Moonlight

Best Visual Effects:
Deepwater Horizon
Doctor Strange
The Jungle Book
Kubo and the Two Strings
Rogue One: A Star Wars Story

Best Production Design:
Arrival
Hail, Caesar!
La La Land
Passengers
Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them

Best Animated Feature:
Kubo and the Two Strings
Moana
My Life as a Zucchini
The Red Turtle
Zootopia

Best Animated Short:
Blind Vaysha
Borrowed Time
Pear Cider and Cigarettes
Pearl
Piper

Best Foreign Language Film:
Land of Mine, Denmark
The Salesman, Iran
A Man Called Ove, Sweden
Tanna, Australia
Toni Erdmann, Germany

Best Supporting Actress:
Viola Davis – Fences
Naomie Harris – Moonlight
Nicole Kidman – Lion
Octavia Spencer – Hidden Figures
Michelle Williams – Manchester By the Sea

Best Sound Mixing:
Arrival
Hacksaw Ridge
La La Land
Rogue One: A Star Wars Story
13 Hours

Best Sound Editing:
Arrival
Deepwater Horizon
Hacksaw Ridge
La La Land
Sully

Best Documentary Feature:
Fire at Sea
I Am Not Your Negro
Life Animated
O.J.: Made in America
13th

Best Costume Design:
Allied
Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them
Florence Foster Jenkins
Jackie
La La Land

Best Makeup and Hairstyling
Star Trek Beyond
Suicide Squad
A Man Called Ove

Best Supporting Actor:
Mahershala Ali – Moonlight
Jeff Bridges – Hell or High Water
Lucas Hedges – Manchester by the Sea
Dev Patel – Lion
Michael Shannon – Nocturnal Animals

Tags: 2017 Oscars

Arrival has been nominated for Best Picture in this year’s Oscars, but it’s Jóhann Jóhannsson’s exceptional score that might earn it a win.

Stepping off from the common trope of ‘aliens arriving on Earth,’ Arrival takes all our human expectations, examines them closely, and then subverts them with remarkable simplicity. Ultimately, it’s a story about choice: the choice to make sacrifices, to trust, to stand united.

It’s an important subject, and a timely one. Amy Adams’ portrayal of Louise Banks, a linguist called to do the ultimate translation job, is breathtaking in its realism and its vulnerability. The cinematography is stunning, and the pacing of the story takes us on a journey that, although walking the much-treaded road of sci-fi, manages to make us feel as if we are exploring entirely new territory.

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Arrival has been nominated for Best Picture in this year’s Oscars, but it’s Jóhann Jóhannsson’s exceptional score that might earn it a win.

Stepping off from the common trope of ‘aliens arriving on Earth,’ Arrival takes all our human expectations, examines them closely, and then subverts them with remarkable simplicity. Ultimately, it’s a story about choice: the choice to make sacrifices, to trust, to stand united.

It’s an important subject, and a timely one. Amy Adams’ portrayal of Louise Banks, a linguist called to do the ultimate translation job, is breathtaking in its realism and its vulnerability. The cinematography is stunning, and the pacing of the story takes us on a journey that, although walking the much-treaded road of sci-fi, manages to make us feel as if we are exploring entirely new territory.

It should come as no surprise that Arrival is being considered for Best Picture in the upcoming Academy Awards. Director Denis Villeneuve has made a name for himself with movies such as Prisoners and Sicario, known for combining raw humanity with breakneck intensity. But although Villeneuve is an extremely talented director, and is accompanied by an excellent cast, it’s Arrival’s score that succeeds in bringing all the delicate pieces of the film together in one cohesive whole… and drawing the audience in.

Jóhann Jóhannsson is an Icelandic composer that has collaborated with Villeneuve repeatedly, and received Academy Award nominations for his work on movies such as The Theory of Everything and Sicario. Unfortunately, Arrival’s score, although arguably his best work yet, is not eligible for nomination this year. In an exclusive report, Variety explained:

“The Academy’s music branch ruled unanimously that voters would be influenced by the use of borrowed material in determining the value of Johann Jóhannsson’s original contributions to Denis Villeneuve’s alien invasion psychodrama.

“Per Rule 15 II E of the Academy’s rules and eligibility guidelines, a score ‘shall not be eligible if it has been diluted by the use of pre-existing music, or it has been diminished in impact by the predominant use of songs or any music not composed specifically for the film by the submitting composer’”

With the director choosing to place Max Richter’s “On the Nature of Daylight” in the beginning and ending sequences of the film (a song which was also a part of Shutter Island’s score), Jóhannsson’s work sadly lost its chance at an Oscar nomination. According to Variety, “it was determined that there would be no way for the audience to distinguish those cues, which bookend the film, from Jóhannsson’s score cues.”

In an interview with Slash Film, Jóhannsson said that he initially wrote his own alternative to the track, while knowing that Villaneuve was considering “On the Nature of Daylight” as well, although it was very different, as he didn’t “really want to do a knock-off of the music.” Ultimately, Jóhannsson says that he supports the choice, because it “works beautifully and it supplies a very strong contrast to the rest of the score.” But it’s a pity that artistic decisions like this one can cost an exceptional composer an Oscar.

For Arrival, his ability to grip the listener with only a few sounds and rhythms, gradually building up to something of massive proportions, was perfectly harnessed once again to create something truly new. The composer told the Guardian: “People are hungry for new sounds, and for the experience of listening to unfamiliar music that you don’t hear on commercials and in every TV show.”

Composers for sci-fi movies tend to favor epic soundtracks to draw audiences into the scene and make them feel the full blow of the story’s emotions. Jóhannsson, however, entirely avoided using orchestras and sounds in the way that we’re familiar with. His quiet buildup is much more powerful. The track “First Encounter,” for example, is mysterious, ominous, and ultimately overwhelming when the sound suddenly comes to life.

“In mainstream cinema, there’s usually too much music,” he said. “In Arrival, the use of space and silence is extremely important. When music is needed, it’s really there and it serves a purpose.”

The music fits in so well that it becomes hard to know when you’re listening to the score, and when you’re listening to the scene. Both elements mesh so well together that they become nearly indistinguishable. And the quietness that is the underlying current of most tracks is a marvelous replica of human emotion — in the case of First Encounter, of what a mind in shock feels like when faced with an experience it can’t understand.

To achieve the unfamiliar sounds that surround Arrival’s alien ships and their mysterious passengers, Jóhannsson brought together vocalists and choirs, to experiment with what could be done with voices, and combining them with cellos, horns, and wood sounds. He explained to Slash Film:

“The reason I wanted voices was really motivated by the script and the story. It’s a story about communication. It’s a story about language. It’s a story about communicating with an alien species. How do we communicate with an intelligent species with who we have no common point of reference? It was this anthropological aspect, this linguistic aspect, that really influences my choice of orchestration and instrumentation.”

It makes for a truly fascinating combination of sounds. Jóhannsson somehow manages to make simple vocal exercises into music that can be anywhere between heartbreaking and heart-wrenchingly hopeful, turning vocal harmony into something almost tangible, and shedding a small ray of light into the mystery of achieving unity in diversity.

This isn’t a horror-movie score — it’s something transporting, yet ambiguous; a difficult task to achieve nowadays. With decades of listening to scores with similar patterns, it takes a lot to leave audience members in the dark about what is about to happen. We’ve become used to screeching violins meaning impending terror, to drums meaning action scenes, to lengthy orchestra pieces surrounding the climax of the film.

We’re used to hearing Hans Zimmer and John William’s epic orchestras, and while beloved and immortalized for their loveliness, they are no longer as revolutionary. We know the swelling sound of strings and the beating of drums, and we have learned to associate certain sounds with victory, and other sounds with fear.

With Jóhannsson, on the other hand, we don’t know what to expect — is the thrumming noise and the horns in the distance leading us to a scene of horror and destruction, or are we about to discover something beautiful? The score leads us into the ship itself, into the arrival, and poses the same questions with music that the movie does with words and breathtaking cinematography.

And yet, despite the unfamiliarity and ambiguity, the result is still something that feels inherently personal. It’s an emotional experience, even in the silences — a difficult task to achieve with such a minimalist style as Jóhannsson’s — and it’s marvelously memorable. It manages to do exactly what Arrival did for us as a film: draw us in with the promise of alien appearances on Earth, and then steal our hearts with the uniquely human experience of choice, trust, love and death.

Interstellar has tried to do this before — melding human vulnerability with world-defining stakes — but critics are split on whether or not it was a success. With Arrival, however, there’s no doubt that the balance between the intimate and the epic was perfectly reached; and it was because of Johann Jóhannsson.

Arrival has been nominated for Best Sound Mixing and Best Sound Mixing – the closest we’ll get to a soundtrack Academy Award — as well as Best Picture, and many others.

Jóhannsson is currently working on the score for Blade Runner 2049 (also directed by Villeneuve), which is expected to premiere this October.

Doctor Who season 10 finally has an air date and not only that, so does its spinoff, Class!

It’s time to celebrate because we finally know when we’ll see Peter Capaldi back in the T.A.R.D.I.S. as the Doctor! BBC America will premiere Doctor Who season 10 on Saturday, April 15 at 9/8c. Check out the brand new trailer promoting the series, narrated by the brand new companion, Bill:

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Doctor Who season 10 finally has an air date and not only that, so does its spinoff, Class!

It’s time to celebrate because we finally know when we’ll see Peter Capaldi back in the T.A.R.D.I.S. as the Doctor! BBC America will premiere Doctor Who season 10 on Saturday, April 15 at 9/8c. Check out the brand new trailer promoting the series, narrated by the brand new companion, Bill:

No word on if the U.K. will be seeing the same air date but it’s more than likely they will since it’s been like that in years past.

This will be Peter Capaldi’s last season as the Doctor, along with Steven Moffat’s last season running the show. After this we’ll be seeing Chris Chibnall taking the reins with a clean slate, and we’re so curious about how the series will go. How will the Doctor regenerate? Will this be Bill’s first and last season on the show as well? Who’s going to be the next Doctor? We’ve got so many questions! But they’ll all be answered in due time… we hope.

And that’s not all! Fans in the U.K. have already had the chance to enjoy the brand new spinoff series, Class, and after Doctor Who premieres on April 15 Americans will finally witness it as well.

Set to air directly after Doctor Who at 10/9c, Class is helmed by award-winning YA writer and executive producer, Patrick Ness. The series follows a group of students at Coal Hill School as they deal aliens, invasions and awkward social dilemmas.

Having seen Class in its entirety we can tell you that it’s got the perfect Doctor Who vibe and should fit in perfectly after you watch the season 10 premiere. Although not everyone loved the premiere, the series as whole definitely grows on you. You’ll just have to check it out for yourself!

Are you excited for ‘Doctor Who’ season 10?