Teen Movies: The land in which everyone is misunderstood, sexually charged, and over dramatic. The good ones are like rare and precious treasures that can stick with you for a lifetime and the atrociously bad ones fill a certain kind of trashy flick craving. Come take a look at the genre with us and revel in the corny and clichéd masterpieces of our time!

Sadly it’s a rare occasion to have someone serenade you from a campus courtyard, find yourself formulating a perfect cheerleading routine to inevitably win nationals, or to figure out that the boy you’ve been texting for over a year is actually the star of your high school football team. It’s no wonder so many of us turn to the teen movie genre to take our troubled and immature lives and turn them into something entertaining, or at the very least, amusing.

Last week The First Time was released on DVD. It stars Dylan O’Brien and Britt Robertson and is a coming of age tale about two teens meeting and experiencing their firsts together. Boy meets girl, girl resists boy, the two fall head over heels for each other, awkward sex ensues, and everything sorts itself out in the end! Yadda yadda yadda… To celebrate its release, we thought it might be fun to take a look at the movie genre as a whole and remember why it is we adore the John Hughes formula so much.

The Leading Guy

Boys

Apart from being absolutely gorgeous and charming, there are a few traits that reoccur in almost every version of every teen movie ever made. Our leading dude is typically portrayed as a nice but slightly misunderstood kid. His friends don’t quite understand him, his teachers don’t try to, his parents definitely don’t… Heck, it wouldn’t be surprising if his pet gerbil had trouble getting to know who the real (insert name here) is. But do those things really matter in the world of teenage dramas? Hint: No they do not. 

Because all of that is totally irrelevant as long as the girl of his dreams – and our leading lady – is aware of his true nature. Sometimes she has to fight her way in, like Torrance from Bring it On. And other times it’s heart-racing-attraction at first sight. High School Musical fans represent! But regardless of how the connection is made, the goal of the pairing is to ensure that our front man grows into himself and learns that the power of love can make you realize just how great you were all along. *cue: AWWWW*

The Leading Girl

Leading Girls

In The First Time our leading girl is Aubrey, a no-nonsense kind of chick who calls things like she sees them. This is a pretty standard trope for the teen genre. Some of the best sassy girl-next-door types would have to be Olive from Easy A, Laney from the classic She’s All That, or Kat in 10 Things I Hate About You. These ladies take crap from no one. But often, like our leading guy, she’s probably just hiding some hidden insecurity or doubt underneath the spikey exterior. If you want to get to know her better you might have to squeeze her into a skimpy dress or pry the loser specks from her face. But eventually, after an exhausting fight of wills, we’ll come to realize just how warm and lovely she was under all that.

Don’t assume this is the only leading girl trope available to us though because there are times when our front lady can be a bit more elusive. Sometimes she’s the shy girl-next-door, other times she’s the average girl-next-door, and occasionally she’s the goth girl-next-door… It really all depends. At the end of the day though, the main objective is to have this independent spirited girl turn into a well adjusted confident young lady – with a boyfriend of course. Duh.

The Dorky Friends

The Dorks

Ok, let’s face it. For most of us, the best friend of the leading character is probably the only reason we allow ourselves to even watch these films. If you weren’t choking down laughter and squeals when Ducky dances for Molly Ringwald’s character in Pretty in Pink, you can just get out right now. We’ll be happy to show you to the door. Because you’re either a lying liar or you just don’t get this genre at all. Also, if you didn’t spend the majority of your time during Nick and Nora’s Infinite Playlist pairing up and shipping Nick’s ragtag group of friends – frankly you’re doing life wrong.

Some of the best lines and most quotable scenes come from the characters that flail around and make snarky comments in the background. Cameron from Ferris Bueller’s Day Off is a legend and deserves to be worshiped. Plus, we’re not even going to mention Ryan from High School Musical, because that kid is too flawless to function. Everything would be just a little bit more awesome if we got to have these characters in our own lives.

The Jerks

The Jerks

Not to be confused with the class ‘hotties’ even though they can at times overlap. The Mean Girl/Guy is the quintessential antagonist: the foil against our leading characters but more likely the enemy against their relationship. Occasionally the mean girl is actually the nice one in disguise (a la Kirsten Dunst in Bring it On) but generally the two sides of the coin shall never meet. Except to fight over a boy or something…

Without those people you love-to-hate we really wouldn’t have a movie to watch. What EXACTLY would Mean Girls be without Regina George? The story of a girl who moved to a new school, where absolutely nothing happened to her, and the boring boringness eats her alive. No one in their right mind would bother with that movie. And half of the reason to watch A Cinderella Story, besides a Chad Michael Murray so young you want to pinch his cheeks, is to see Fiona demand from her step daughter Norwegian salmon from ‘Norwegia.’ Without the arch villain and their ridiculous behavior, there would be no point in showing up.

The Rebels

The Rebels

The ‘bad boy,’ the kid who ‘fights the power,’ the one who likes to ‘go against the grain.’ That’s who our rebel is. Despite your age, there is only one character that should pop into your mind when you think of “The Rebel.” And that character is… John Bender from The Breakfast Club. Out of every teen movie ever made, this is the ultimate portrayal of the trope: loudmouth, messy, abrasive guy with a bad attitude. Who is absolutely swoon worthy by the way.

Don’t question why these characters are so unbelievably attractive, just go with it. Leave the deeper intellectual reasoning until after the credits start to roll. Because when we’re in the zone, it’s best to just appreciate the experience on a completely superficial level. Sebastian from Cruel Intentions isn’t meant to be loved. He’s a bad guy, with terrible motives and a black heart. But did that stop Reese Witherspoon’s character from falling head-over-heals?! NO. No it did not. So we really shouldn’t expect any less for ourselves.

The Babes

The Babes

Usually, the hot person we’re all ogling is there to serve as a distraction. You see, this character is used as a diversion from the slightly less-obviously-attractive leads. The boys with the torsos and the girls with lip gloss practically dripping from their faces… They serve as a wedge between our leading couple. They try to mislead us into thinking that they may actually swoop in and ruin the chances of the pair. Ironically, and this is the beauty of teen movies in general, these are rarely the characters we actually end up liking. They tend to be pretty and nice to look at, but also really dull and dumb. Shane West learns this lesson the hard way in Whatever It Takes.

Although there are movies that try and break the mold. Like The Girl Next Door which revolutionizes the genre by showing that porn star looking girls are people too! With hearts and depth and stuff! And in She’s the Man our leading dude is so unbelievably attractive and sweet that Viola simply can’t restrain herself and falls completely in love.

Sure teen movies have a pretty generic pattern. The stories are cliché and the lessons have become trite over the years. But the truth is, an honest amusing portrayal of young adulthood can be really freaking powerful. That’s why the powers that be will keep making them and why we’ll keep showing up. Because sometimes all we really need is a little dose of escapism. A place where it’s safe enough to suspend reality for a while because eventually it’ll all be okay in the end.

So what are your favorite teen movies and why do you like them so much? Have you ever been drawn to one that you know isn’t technically ‘good’? If so, why do you think you still enjoyed it?

At a time when the divide between the generations has arguably never been greater, The 100 encapsulates the struggle of millennials more than any other current show.

This article was submitted by Hypable reader Stephanie Farnsworth.

The media churns out article after article about the laziness of millennials, and then complains about how we work too hard. Millennials are branded “snowflakes” even as we struggle to pay rent and bear the consequences of the economic fall-out that we didn’t cause.

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At a time when the divide between the generations has arguably never been greater, The 100 encapsulates the struggle of millennials more than any other current show.

This article was submitted by Hypable reader Stephanie Farnsworth.

The media churns out article after article about the laziness of millennials, and then complains about how we work too hard. Millennials are branded “snowflakes” even as we struggle to pay rent and bear the consequences of the economic fall-out that we didn’t cause.

The CW drama The 100, which is entering its fourth season in February, rather bluntly captures that sense of young people paying the price of previous generations; at the beginning of the series, a council of adult politicians literally sent teenagers to a radiation-soaked earth to try to save their own society.

The 100 season 1 Jaha

The pilot episode revealed the extent of the power imbalance between the generations that reflects our society today: Chancellor Jaha presented the project of ‘the hundred’ as a way for young delinquents to fulfil their duty and gain redemption, even if it cost them their lives. They were even expected to be grateful, because they’d been judged as criminals and would have been executed anyway, even for relatively petty crimes.

And as The 100 season 4 approaches, the adults’ attitudes towards the kids haven’t changed that much from the show’s premiere.

Related: Previewing The 100 season 4: What to expect when you’re expecting an apocalypse

Generational conflict and tension has remained at the heart of the show throughout the series. The generational focus has not been diluted even as the world has expanded to reveal far more of the culture of the Grounders; in fact, this has only given rise to more conflict as the older members of Skaikru have struggled to accept not only the Grounders’ belief system, but the young age of their Commanders.

As the figurehead for all of the delinquents, lead character Clarke has been undermined and derided at every turn. In season 2, her own mother scoffed at the idea that Clarke and Lexa could lead their people to safety, mocking the Grounder Commander’s age and commenting, “They’re being led by a child.” It was up to Kane to point out that Skaikru were, too, because none of the adults had managed to think of a solution, and it was up to Clarke to save them.

Both Abby and Kane’s attitudes play into the infantilising of the millennial generation. Neither Clarke nor Lexa were children. They were young adults, and they were working towards making a better society where all of their people could survive while the adults were focused on internal power plays. Jaha was ready to leave the young adults in Mount Weather to die, but that’s no surprise; he’d made that decision before.

Abby couldn’t bear losing power to her own daughter, to the extent that it culminated in a scene where she assaulted Raven. The young mechanic was cool and composed in her response, pointing out that Clarke stopped being a child when Abby signed off on her daughter being sent to Earth to die.

Raven’s positioning was clear: Although not condemned by any crimes (even if she had committed the crime that Finn was convicted of), she chose to align herself with the hundred and was the one who chose to come to Earth simply to help. The younger generation, in short, pulled together, and when the older generation landed they brought down their old rules and oppression.

The consequences were overwhelming for the younger characters. They were tasked with saving everyone at the expense of any peace to their own souls. Clarke demonstrated this more than any other character and she ended up fleeing her people, unable to carry the burden of expectation they all had for her. It’s something she wrestled with throughout season 3, and with Earth facing a nuclear apocalypse again, Clarke will have to make peace — not with herself, but with how everyone else sees her if she is to survive.

The 100 season 4 Bellamy

Bellamy, too, will have to find his own identity. Last season, he effectively turned his back on the hundred to win the praise of Pike, and Bellamy upheld and supported his bigotry.

His part in slaughtering the Ark survivors’ 300 Grounder allies will not be easily forgotten. Bellamy wanted to be the hero. He wanted to protect people (specifically the women in his life) who never asked for that, and he wanted to be a part of the establishment.

If The 100 presents a metaphor for the real-life relationship between millennials and Gen X, Bellamy is the one wearing the rose-tinted glasses that younger people are supposed to wear when viewing an establishment that has been willing to regularly criticise later generations.

He had longed to be part of the Guard since he was a boy, and he saw a way to fulfil that old dream and become part of an order that had caused his entire family so much suffering. Bellamy was never quite the hundred: He was older, and his sole concern initially had been protecting his sister. It was easier for him to flit between the different groups within Skaikru than it was for any of the rest of the hundred.

After the events of last season, however, Bellamy now knows the pain he’s caused by his choices. And in season 4, he will have to choose exactly who to put his faith in: Clarke or the old order?

But maybe, in light of the external threat that now threatens humanity’s survival, the two generations will finally be able to pull together. There have been many hints that Clarke and Jaha will find some common ground this season due to the pressures they are facing, and Jaha knows well the cost of leading. Through Clarke, we will see whether lessons can be learned from the mistakes of the generation before.

Octavia once accused Clarke of being just like the council by deciding who was worthy of life. Clarke now must show whether she will follow that path or whether she can be better. The millennial dream of whether we can learn from the repression and conservatism of the past will be on trial in The 100 season 4, as we see just how Clarke plans to lead her friends into this new battle.

The 100‘ season 4 premieres February 1 at 9/8c on The CW

Teen Wolf season 6 will be its last — but for how long? In an age of revivals, reboots, and remakes, we really don’t know if this will be the end.

Thanks to Netflix, Gilmore Girls returned to add another chapter to its beloved story. And just this month alone, we got news that Charmed and Will & Grace will both be returning to our screens as well.

So, yes, this is the final season of Teen Wolf, but as fans, we can always hope to see more one day in the future.

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Teen Wolf season 6 will be its last — but for how long? In an age of revivals, reboots, and remakes, we really don’t know if this will be the end.

Thanks to Netflix, Gilmore Girls returned to add another chapter to its beloved story. And just this month alone, we got news that Charmed and Will & Grace will both be returning to our screens as well.

So, yes, this is the final season of Teen Wolf, but as fans, we can always hope to see more one day in the future.

And apparently Teen Wolf creator and showrunner Jeff Davis must keep that in mind as well.

Speaking to EW about how series finales have changed in the era of reboots, Davis says it’s smart to keep the series ending open enough to allow for the possibility of a revival down the line.

However, this certainly comes with some concerns as well. “One of the things it does is keep you from killing off a lot of characters,” he says. “So the series-ending episode where you blow up the entire world and kill off half your main characters isn’t the smartest thing to do anymore.”

Killing half your main characters would be a shock, but not necessarily a good one. Today’s media is consumed so intensely by its fans that a series finale like that has the potential to put an audience off the property for good.

So not only do you have to worry about the potential for a revival with half your players in the ground, but you have to worry about whether your original fans will even want to tune in for more. That could make or break the whole idea of a revival.

But what about on the other side of that? Creators want their stories to leave a lasting impression, and what better way to do that than to have one of your main characters sacrifice themselves for their friends?

“I do worry that it makes finales less impactful — you don’t want to give a half-assed ending,” Davis says of the need to keep a potential revival in mind. “You want a story to feel like it finishes.”

And that’s something fans of Teen Wolf have been worrying over since it was first announced season 6 would be the show’s last. Who will we lose in this final season, and what impact will that make on our overall feelings about the series?

We’ve come too far to lose someone we cared about from day one, but we’ve also invested too much time to see a mediocre ending. It’s a challenging balance that all fans of Teen Wolf are hoping Davis and his team are up for.

What do you think of the idea for an eventual ‘Teen Wolf‘ revival?

When the first rumors of a Charmed reboot came out a few years ago I started a mental list of what it has to have. Now that it’s officially happening here’s what I think a ’70s-era Charmed show can still pull off.

The mythology of Charmed runs deep. So deep, in fact, that they could have set this during the founding of America and we’d still be able to get a Charmed feeling thanks to the original show’s flashbacks. (But I’m happy it’s not set way back then.)

Given the show’s history, I’m not worried about it taking place in the ’70s; I’m actually excited about it. It’s an original take on how we can learn more about the Halliwell family before the Power of Three was old enough to realize they were the most powerful witches in the world, and I’m excited to see what they bring to it.

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When the first rumors of a Charmed reboot came out a few years ago I started a mental list of what it has to have. Now that it’s officially happening here’s what I think a ’70s-era Charmed show can still pull off.

The mythology of Charmed runs deep. So deep, in fact, that they could have set this during the founding of America and we’d still be able to get a Charmed feeling thanks to the original show’s flashbacks. (But I’m happy it’s not set way back then.)

Given the show’s history, I’m not worried about it taking place in the ’70s; I’m actually excited about it. It’s an original take on how we can learn more about the Halliwell family before the Power of Three was old enough to realize they were the most powerful witches in the world, and I’m excited to see what they bring to it.

With that being said, it’s hard to think of anything Charmed related happening without its important mythology and history, so there are just a few things this reboot absolutely has to have.

Whitelighters

Whitelighters are the angels in the Charmed universe, and without them we wouldn’t have Leo or Paige and we wouldn’t have the almost never-ending source of wisdom and guidance we’re so used to seeing.

It scares me to think about this happening without the Halliwell family at all, but if that is the (horrible) route they choose to go, then they’re definitely going to need a Whitelighter to guide the characters and tell them what’s up. Without the Book of Shadows, a Whitelighter is going to be the only way the new witches will have any hope of figuring out what is going on.

And I will never get sick of seeing people orb everywhere — that’s one of the best parts of the original show, tbh.

Darklighters/Demons

On the opposite end of angels there are always demons, so it’d be a missed opportunity to not include them in this reboot. Darklighters are the only thing that could kill a Whitelighter, so it makes sense to bring them into the picture as well so we could get some d-d-d-drama.

The only hesitance I have about this new reboot bringing Darklighters and demons into the mix is that today’s audience seem enthralled with demons and fighting, and I worry there’s not going to be as much character growth in the newer episodes as there was with the original series.

I don’t want a Charmed reboot to be all about the demon fighting and not enough about the sisters and their relationship, but hopefully the fact that it’s helmed by women will help prevent that from happening.

Pre-bound Charmed ones

As any well-informed Charmed fan will tell you, the main girls (Prue, Piper, and Phoebe) had their powers bound/stripped when they were children so they could grow up without the threats of demons and death. If the show is about the Halliwell family, I’m hoping it begins at least a good six months or so before their powers get taken away from them.

There are so many questions I have about the pre-bound Charmed ones: Did they have powers in the womb like Wyatt, or was that just because Wyatt was the product of a Charmed one and a Whitelighter? Did the girls having powers bring so much evil that Grandma had no choice but to take them away? What was life like for Penny and Patty with the girls as youngsters? Sure, we saw glimpses of that briefly in the main series, but there’s still so much more to know!

I’m hoping that if the show does indeed take place around the Halliwell family in the ’70s, we’ll get to see what led up to Grandma Penny binding their powers. Hopefully it might be an even bigger surprise and twist than we all thought.

Kick-ass Penny

Speaking of Penny Halliwell, the grandmother to the Charmed Ones and mother of Patty Halliwell, she is one bad-ass bitch. We know this because of the several times she’s been summoned by the sisters for help (both supernatural and remedial).

There’s no way the show could revolve around the Halliwell family in the ’70s and not include one of the most bad-ass witches in the family line. Witnessing Penny kick some ass is something we all need to see, and I’m sure it would be one of the best parts of the whole series.

I know the show is still in its beginning stages and there are absolutely no cast members involved yet, but I would die to see Jennifer Rhodes reprise her role as Penny just to see that unfiltered sass come back to my screen.

Cameos galore!

Don’t get me started on how ticked I am that this is a prequel happening in the ’70s, if it even is that. When I think Charmed, I think Phoebe, Piper, Prue, Paige, Leo, etc. So naturally, to make up for this hideous decision in setting, the show has to make up for it by coming up with some excuse to bring back the original girls.

Alyssa Milano, Holly Marie Combs and Rose McGowan have all said they’d be totally down to return for a Charmed reunion, so it hurts that whoever decided to put this reboot in the ’70s basically took that interest and threw it out the window. I’m hoping they work in a way to get the girls to show up in this series, and not just once.

Having the main girls appear just once in this reboot would basically be blasphemy, so hopefully the main characters figure out a way to find out about the existence of the Charmed Ones and use some sort of spell to contact them occasionally for help.

Oh, and it wouldn’t hurt to see Leo, Chris, Wyatt or all the other characters every one in a while, too.

Bonus: Reference the original theme song

This is way less likely than anything else, but I’m hoping that when the show starts up they utilize the show’s original theme song, How Soon Is Now by The Smiths.

It’s a damn shame that the entire series is on Netflix but with some rip-off theme song. You can’t have Charmed without The Smiths! Well, you can as evidenced by Netflix, but you really, really shouldn’t.

The music license to use the song expired, but please, will someone contact The Smiths and politely ask them to let us hear it with Charmed again? Here’s the original theme for those of you who miss it like I do.

What do you want in the ‘Charmed’ reboot?