There are 80 new Pokémon to catch and slightly different game play has been added. Here’s everything you need to know about Pokémon GO Gen 2, including a complete list and must-know tricks!

By now you’ve heard the news: generation 2 Pokémon have been added to last summer’s blockbuster hit mobile game Pokémon Go. I will admit that though hype for the game died down significantly last fall, I, for one, never stopped playing!

In fact, just last week I completed my North American generation 1 Pokedex, thank you very much (that’s every generation 1 Pokemon, the 8 baby Pokemon that were added in December, but not the region exclusives). So what exactly does that mean for the game? How can you catch them? What new features have been added to the game? We’ve broken down some of the details for you below!

What is Generation 2, exactly?

When Pokémon GO was released last summer, it included all of the “generation 1” Pokémon. These are the Pokémon that were originally released with the first ever Pokémon game over 20 years ago on Blue and Red. Generation 2 came with the next wave of games a year later in Gold and Silver. Those generation 2 monsters are now catchable in Go. And although there is code in the game for the legendaries in both Gen 1 and Gen 2, they have not appeared in the game.

‘Pokémon GO’ Gen 2 list of Pokémon

Here is a list of Gen 2 Pokémon that should now be appearing in Pokémon GO:

152 Chikorita
153 Bayleef
154 Meganium
155 Cyndaquil
156 Quilava
157 Typhlosion
158 Totodile
159 Croconaw
160 Feraligatr
161 Sentret
162 Furret
163 Hoothoot
164 Noctowl
165 Ledyba
166 Ledian
167 Spinarak
168 Ariados
169 Crobat
170 Chinchou
171 Lanturn
172 Pichu
173 Cleffa
174 Igglybuff
175 Togepi
176 Togetic
177 Natu
178 Xatu
179 Mareep
180 Flaaffy
181 Ampharos
182 Bellossom
183 Marill
184 Azumarill
185 Sudowoodo
186 Politoed
187 Hoppip
188 Skiploom
189 Jumpluff
190 Aipom
191 Sunkern
192 Sunflora
193 Yanma
194 Wooper
195 Quagsire
196 Espeon
197 Umbreon
198 Murkrow
199 Slowking
200 Misdreavus
201 Unown
202 Wobbuffet
203 Girafarig
204 Pineco
205 Forretress
206 Dunsparce
207 Gligar
208 Steelix
209 Snubbull
210 Granbull
211 Qwilfish
212 Scizor
213 Shuckle
214 Heracross
215 Sneasel
216 Teddiursa
217 Ursaring
218 Slugma
219 Magcargo
220 Swinub
221 Piloswine
222 Corsola
223 Remoraid
224 Octillery
225 Delibird
226 Mantine
227 Skarmory
228 Houndour
229 Houndoom
230 Kingdra
231 Phanpy
232 Donphan
233 Porygon2
234 Stantler
235 Smeargle
236 Tyrogue
237 Hitmontop
238 Smoochum
239 Elekid
240 Magby
241 Miltank
242 Blissey
243 Raikou
244 Entei
245 Suicune
246 Larvitar
247 Pupitar
248 Tyranitar
249 Lugia
250 Ho_oh
251 Celebi

What’s new in ‘Pokemon GO’ besides new Pokemon?

Aside from the actual release of the Gen 2 Pokemon, the app itself got an upgrade this week with a handful of new and useful features. We previously reported the new details when Niantic, the company who makes the game, originally sent out the press release. But here are some new things you will see that weren’t mentioned.

  • New music: Along with Gen 2 came music that closely resembles the music used in the original Gold and Silver games. You will also hear a change in the music when you are playing during the day compared to at night. You’ll also hear different music during the Pokémon encounter screen (when you’re throwing the Poké Balls).
  • New Pokédex icons: Some of the Gen 1 Pokemon got slight makeovers with their icons that appear in the Nearby screen and the Pokedex screen. Zubat, Golbat, Seaking and Aerodacty received changes, just to name a few (there may be others).

  • New avatar customizations: As previously reported, there are new customizations that are free for your avatar. I decided to make mine go bare-foot so that at least one of us is connected to the earth while we walk and stare at our screens playing this game. But also added are new accessories that you can purchase to customize, things like glasses, new bags, and new shirts.

  • Critical Catch: Traditionally, you throw a Poké Ball, it rattles three times and you’ve caught the Pokemon. Now, if you use a curveball throw you may be able to catch the Pokémon with no rattles, a.k.a. a “critical catch.”
  • Eevee evolution name hacks are back: Just as with Gen 1’s Vaporeon, Flareon and Jolteon, Gen 2 adds two more Eevee evolutions that can use a name hack. If you change your Eevee’s name to Sakura, your Eevee will evolve into Espeon. If you change your Eevee’s name to Tamao, your Eevee will evolve into Umbreon. Note that this hack can only be done once. After that, it’s completely random.
  • Pokémon GO’s Twitter account also tweeted tonight that evolved Pokemon caught in the wild will receive more candies. This means you will get more candies for catching a Pidgeotto than you will when you catch a Pidgey, for example.
  • Your bag has not expanded: By default, you are able to carry 300 Pokemon at once. That means if you plan on catching all 140 available Gen 1 and Gen 2 Pokemon, you’re going to need to spend a few bucks to upgrade your bag capacity. 100 PokéCoins costs $0.99. A bag upgrade will give you 50 more open slots for Pokémon and costs 200 Pokécoins.

More ‘Pokémon GO’ updates for hard-core trainers

For fans who play on the regular, there are some other changes to the game that may effect your game play.

  • Now that Crobat and Kingdra have been added to Pokémon GO, Zubat and Horsea now only need 25 candies to evolve.
  • Many move attacks have changed their value. For example, Hyper Beam is now 150.
  • Togetic is now catchable in the wild (sorry if Togepi has been your buddy Pokemon since December and you’re at 49 candies!)
  • Togetic is reportedly harder to catch in the wild than Dragonite.
  • The baby Gen 2 Pokémon that were previously only able to be hatched in eggs are now catchable in the wild. That includes Pichu, Cleffa, Igglybuff, Togepi, Smoochum, Elekid and Magby.
  • The game will balance out Pokémon CP to even out game play sometimes. Some Pokémon will get higher CP while others will get lower CP. In this update, Lapras has been “nerfed” (as fans have come to call it) and will have lower CP in the game.
  • HootHoot and Sentret are confirmed as the new Pokemon Ditto hides as. There may be others as we learn more about Gen 2.
  • As of this writing there are no new region exclusives. You may recall the Gen 1 region exclusives: Tauros for North America, Mr. Mime for Europe, Farfetch’d for Asia and Kangaskhan for Australia.

I, for one, don’t plan on putting Pokémon GO down for the entire weekend. We’ll be sure to update you with even more important details as the refresh and expansion of the game continues to be discovered.

If you have other observations about Pokémon GO, feel free to leave them in the comments below.

For now, feast your eyes and be jealous of Twitter user @KaylaAndRuss, who caught a wild Tyranitaur in the first hours of Gen 2 being released!

Tags: pokemon go

Here are the 2017 Oscars winners and losers

8:25 pm EST, February 26, 2017

The 2017 Oscars took place Sunday night in Hollywood and found La La Land cleaning up with six wins. Here are the Academy Award winners!

ABC’s Jimmy Kimmel hosted the 2017 Oscars, which took place at the Dolby Theater. The event featured live performances of all five Oscar-nominated songs.

2017 Oscar winners list

Read full article

The 2017 Oscars took place Sunday night in Hollywood and found La La Land cleaning up with six wins. Here are the Academy Award winners!

ABC’s Jimmy Kimmel hosted the 2017 Oscars, which took place at the Dolby Theater. The event featured live performances of all five Oscar-nominated songs.

2017 Oscar winners list

Related: We asked our parents to describe the 2017 Oscar nominees

Below is a complete list of Oscar winner and losers.

2017 Oscar winner list

Note: The final winner of the night was originally announced to be La La Land, but the announcement was actually an error — Moonlight won Best Picture. Awkward.

Best Picture:
Arrival
Fences
Hacksaw Ridge
Hell or High Water
Hidden Figures
La La Land

Lion
Manchester By the Sea
Moonlight

Best Actress:
Isabelle Huppert – Elle
Ruth Negga – Loving
Natalie Portman – Jackie
Emma Stone – La La Land
Meryl Streep – Florence Foster Jenkins

Best Actor:
Casey Affleck – Manchester By the Sea
Andrew Garfield – Hacksaw Ridge
Ryan Gosling – La La Land
Viggo Mortensen – Captain Fantastic
Denzel Washington – Fences

Best Director:
Damien Chazelle – La La Land
Mel Gibson – Hacksaw Ridge
Barry Jenkins – Moonlight
Kenneth Lonergan – Manchester By the Sea
Denis Villeneuve – Arrival

Best Adapted Screenplay:
Arrival – Eric Heisserer
Fences – August Wilson
Hidden Figures – Allison Schroeder, Theodore Melfi
Lion – Luke Davies
Moonlight – Barry Jenkins

Best Original Screenplay:
20th Century Women – Mike Mills
Hell or High Water – Taylor Sheridan
La La Land – Damien Chazelle
The Lobster – Yorgos Lanthimos, Efthymis Filippou
Manchester By the Sea – Kenneth Lonergan

Best Original Song:
“Audition” – La La Land
“Can’t Stop the Feeling” – Trolls
“City of Stars” – La La Land
“The Empty Chair” – Jim: The James Foley Story
“How Far I’ll Go” – Moana

Best Score:
Jackie
La La Land
Lion
Moonlight
Passengers

Best Cinematography:
Bradford Young – Arrival
Linus Sandgren – La La Land
Grieg Fraser – Lion
James Laxton – Moonlight
Rodrigo Prieto – Silence

Best Live Action Short Film
Timecode
Sing
Silent Nights
Ennemis Interieurs
La Femme et le TGV

Best Documentary, Short Subject:
4.1 Miles
Extremis
Joe’s Violin
Watani: My Homeland
The White Helmets

Best Editing:
Arrival
Hacksaw Ridge
Hell or High Water
La La Land
Moonlight

Best Visual Effects:
Deepwater Horizon
Doctor Strange
The Jungle Book
Kubo and the Two Strings
Rogue One: A Star Wars Story

Best Production Design:
Arrival
Hail, Caesar!
La La Land
Passengers
Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them

Best Animated Feature:
Kubo and the Two Strings
Moana
My Life as a Zucchini
The Red Turtle
Zootopia

Best Animated Short:
Blind Vaysha
Borrowed Time
Pear Cider and Cigarettes
Pearl
Piper

Best Foreign Language Film:
Land of Mine, Denmark
The Salesman, Iran
A Man Called Ove, Sweden
Tanna, Australia
Toni Erdmann, Germany

Best Supporting Actress:
Viola Davis – Fences
Naomie Harris – Moonlight
Nicole Kidman – Lion
Octavia Spencer – Hidden Figures
Michelle Williams – Manchester By the Sea

Best Sound Mixing:
Arrival
Hacksaw Ridge
La La Land
Rogue One: A Star Wars Story
13 Hours

Best Sound Editing:
Arrival
Deepwater Horizon
Hacksaw Ridge
La La Land
Sully

Best Documentary Feature:
Fire at Sea
I Am Not Your Negro
Life Animated
O.J.: Made in America
13th

Best Costume Design:
Allied
Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them
Florence Foster Jenkins
Jackie
La La Land

Best Makeup and Hairstyling
Star Trek Beyond
Suicide Squad
A Man Called Ove

Best Supporting Actor:
Mahershala Ali – Moonlight
Jeff Bridges – Hell or High Water
Lucas Hedges – Manchester by the Sea
Dev Patel – Lion
Michael Shannon – Nocturnal Animals

Tags: 2017 Oscars

Arrival has been nominated for Best Picture in this year’s Oscars, but it’s Jóhann Jóhannsson’s exceptional score that might earn it a win.

Stepping off from the common trope of ‘aliens arriving on Earth,’ Arrival takes all our human expectations, examines them closely, and then subverts them with remarkable simplicity. Ultimately, it’s a story about choice: the choice to make sacrifices, to trust, to stand united.

It’s an important subject, and a timely one. Amy Adams’ portrayal of Louise Banks, a linguist called to do the ultimate translation job, is breathtaking in its realism and its vulnerability. The cinematography is stunning, and the pacing of the story takes us on a journey that, although walking the much-treaded road of sci-fi, manages to make us feel as if we are exploring entirely new territory.

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Arrival has been nominated for Best Picture in this year’s Oscars, but it’s Jóhann Jóhannsson’s exceptional score that might earn it a win.

Stepping off from the common trope of ‘aliens arriving on Earth,’ Arrival takes all our human expectations, examines them closely, and then subverts them with remarkable simplicity. Ultimately, it’s a story about choice: the choice to make sacrifices, to trust, to stand united.

It’s an important subject, and a timely one. Amy Adams’ portrayal of Louise Banks, a linguist called to do the ultimate translation job, is breathtaking in its realism and its vulnerability. The cinematography is stunning, and the pacing of the story takes us on a journey that, although walking the much-treaded road of sci-fi, manages to make us feel as if we are exploring entirely new territory.

It should come as no surprise that Arrival is being considered for Best Picture in the upcoming Academy Awards. Director Denis Villeneuve has made a name for himself with movies such as Prisoners and Sicario, known for combining raw humanity with breakneck intensity. But although Villeneuve is an extremely talented director, and is accompanied by an excellent cast, it’s Arrival’s score that succeeds in bringing all the delicate pieces of the film together in one cohesive whole… and drawing the audience in.

Jóhann Jóhannsson is an Icelandic composer that has collaborated with Villeneuve repeatedly, and received Academy Award nominations for his work on movies such as The Theory of Everything and Sicario. Unfortunately, Arrival’s score, although arguably his best work yet, is not eligible for nomination this year. In an exclusive report, Variety explained:

“The Academy’s music branch ruled unanimously that voters would be influenced by the use of borrowed material in determining the value of Johann Jóhannsson’s original contributions to Denis Villeneuve’s alien invasion psychodrama.

“Per Rule 15 II E of the Academy’s rules and eligibility guidelines, a score ‘shall not be eligible if it has been diluted by the use of pre-existing music, or it has been diminished in impact by the predominant use of songs or any music not composed specifically for the film by the submitting composer’”

With the director choosing to place Max Richter’s “On the Nature of Daylight” in the beginning and ending sequences of the film (a song which was also a part of Shutter Island’s score), Jóhannsson’s work sadly lost its chance at an Oscar nomination. According to Variety, “it was determined that there would be no way for the audience to distinguish those cues, which bookend the film, from Jóhannsson’s score cues.”

In an interview with Slash Film, Jóhannsson said that he initially wrote his own alternative to the track, while knowing that Villaneuve was considering “On the Nature of Daylight” as well, although it was very different, as he didn’t “really want to do a knock-off of the music.” Ultimately, Jóhannsson says that he supports the choice, because it “works beautifully and it supplies a very strong contrast to the rest of the score.” But it’s a pity that artistic decisions like this one can cost an exceptional composer an Oscar.

For Arrival, his ability to grip the listener with only a few sounds and rhythms, gradually building up to something of massive proportions, was perfectly harnessed once again to create something truly new. The composer told the Guardian: “People are hungry for new sounds, and for the experience of listening to unfamiliar music that you don’t hear on commercials and in every TV show.”

Composers for sci-fi movies tend to favor epic soundtracks to draw audiences into the scene and make them feel the full blow of the story’s emotions. Jóhannsson, however, entirely avoided using orchestras and sounds in the way that we’re familiar with. His quiet buildup is much more powerful. The track “First Encounter,” for example, is mysterious, ominous, and ultimately overwhelming when the sound suddenly comes to life.

“In mainstream cinema, there’s usually too much music,” he said. “In Arrival, the use of space and silence is extremely important. When music is needed, it’s really there and it serves a purpose.”

The music fits in so well that it becomes hard to know when you’re listening to the score, and when you’re listening to the scene. Both elements mesh so well together that they become nearly indistinguishable. And the quietness that is the underlying current of most tracks is a marvelous replica of human emotion — in the case of First Encounter, of what a mind in shock feels like when faced with an experience it can’t understand.

To achieve the unfamiliar sounds that surround Arrival’s alien ships and their mysterious passengers, Jóhannsson brought together vocalists and choirs, to experiment with what could be done with voices, and combining them with cellos, horns, and wood sounds. He explained to Slash Film:

“The reason I wanted voices was really motivated by the script and the story. It’s a story about communication. It’s a story about language. It’s a story about communicating with an alien species. How do we communicate with an intelligent species with who we have no common point of reference? It was this anthropological aspect, this linguistic aspect, that really influences my choice of orchestration and instrumentation.”

It makes for a truly fascinating combination of sounds. Jóhannsson somehow manages to make simple vocal exercises into music that can be anywhere between heartbreaking and heart-wrenchingly hopeful, turning vocal harmony into something almost tangible, and shedding a small ray of light into the mystery of achieving unity in diversity.

This isn’t a horror-movie score — it’s something transporting, yet ambiguous; a difficult task to achieve nowadays. With decades of listening to scores with similar patterns, it takes a lot to leave audience members in the dark about what is about to happen. We’ve become used to screeching violins meaning impending terror, to drums meaning action scenes, to lengthy orchestra pieces surrounding the climax of the film.

We’re used to hearing Hans Zimmer and John William’s epic orchestras, and while beloved and immortalized for their loveliness, they are no longer as revolutionary. We know the swelling sound of strings and the beating of drums, and we have learned to associate certain sounds with victory, and other sounds with fear.

With Jóhannsson, on the other hand, we don’t know what to expect — is the thrumming noise and the horns in the distance leading us to a scene of horror and destruction, or are we about to discover something beautiful? The score leads us into the ship itself, into the arrival, and poses the same questions with music that the movie does with words and breathtaking cinematography.

And yet, despite the unfamiliarity and ambiguity, the result is still something that feels inherently personal. It’s an emotional experience, even in the silences — a difficult task to achieve with such a minimalist style as Jóhannsson’s — and it’s marvelously memorable. It manages to do exactly what Arrival did for us as a film: draw us in with the promise of alien appearances on Earth, and then steal our hearts with the uniquely human experience of choice, trust, love and death.

Interstellar has tried to do this before — melding human vulnerability with world-defining stakes — but critics are split on whether or not it was a success. With Arrival, however, there’s no doubt that the balance between the intimate and the epic was perfectly reached; and it was because of Johann Jóhannsson.

Arrival has been nominated for Best Sound Mixing and Best Sound Mixing – the closest we’ll get to a soundtrack Academy Award — as well as Best Picture, and many others.

Jóhannsson is currently working on the score for Blade Runner 2049 (also directed by Villeneuve), which is expected to premiere this October.

Doctor Who season 10 finally has an air date and not only that, so does its spinoff, Class!

It’s time to celebrate because we finally know when we’ll see Peter Capaldi back in the T.A.R.D.I.S. as the Doctor! BBC America will premiere Doctor Who season 10 on Saturday, April 15 at 9/8c. Check out the brand new trailer promoting the series, narrated by the brand new companion, Bill:

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Doctor Who season 10 finally has an air date and not only that, so does its spinoff, Class!

It’s time to celebrate because we finally know when we’ll see Peter Capaldi back in the T.A.R.D.I.S. as the Doctor! BBC America will premiere Doctor Who season 10 on Saturday, April 15 at 9/8c. Check out the brand new trailer promoting the series, narrated by the brand new companion, Bill:

No word on if the U.K. will be seeing the same air date but it’s more than likely they will since it’s been like that in years past.

This will be Peter Capaldi’s last season as the Doctor, along with Steven Moffat’s last season running the show. After this we’ll be seeing Chris Chibnall taking the reins with a clean slate, and we’re so curious about how the series will go. How will the Doctor regenerate? Will this be Bill’s first and last season on the show as well? Who’s going to be the next Doctor? We’ve got so many questions! But they’ll all be answered in due time… we hope.

And that’s not all! Fans in the U.K. have already had the chance to enjoy the brand new spinoff series, Class, and after Doctor Who premieres on April 15 Americans will finally witness it as well.

Set to air directly after Doctor Who at 10/9c, Class is helmed by award-winning YA writer and executive producer, Patrick Ness. The series follows a group of students at Coal Hill School as they deal aliens, invasions and awkward social dilemmas.

Having seen Class in its entirety we can tell you that it’s got the perfect Doctor Who vibe and should fit in perfectly after you watch the season 10 premiere. Although not everyone loved the premiere, the series as whole definitely grows on you. You’ll just have to check it out for yourself!

Are you excited for ‘Doctor Who’ season 10?