Outlander took over room 6A at Comic-Con with many fans camped out to get the best spots for the panel.

The Starz crew really went all out to woo current fans and draw in new ones. For starters, it was hard to miss the castle and standing stones that hummed that were easily the showpiece of the exhibit floor. The fact the the display was crawling with Scots or faux-Scots in period attire didn’t hurt either.

Present in room 6A were executive producer Ron Moore and author Diana Gabaldon. Also present were actors Caitriona Balfe (Claire), Sam Heughan (Jamie), Tobias Menzies (Frank/Jack), Graham McTavish (Dougal), and Lotte Verbeek (Gellis).

1. What it was like filming in Scotland?

Graham McTavish and Sam Heughan said it was a pleasure to be back there and to have Scotland actually be a character. There was very little CGI needed. Caitriona Balfe stated the beautiful, natural light alone was amazing. Unlike the US or Canada, Scotland won’t let them block off public land, so the production had a lot of set visitors to deal with. However, the cast was grateful for the sugary treats they brought.

2. What did each actor want to get across?

McTavish: masculine vulnerability. Verbeek: that good and evil are not simple definitions. Menzies: exploring sadism and loss for his two characters. Balfe: inner strength under duress and stress. Heughan: the journey of almost no responsibility to being challenged to change the way he thinks.

3. Was it difficult to deal with the Gaelic?

It’s pronounced “gah-lic” the language of the Scots of the period. Both McTavish and Heughan felt they were honoring their ancestors by speaking it. The Gaelic is not subtitled in the show because it’s told from Claire’s POV and she doesn’t speak it. Ron Moore wanted the audience to understand as much as Claire did only by context and inflection.

4. Hardest scene on set.

Sam Hueghan had to have a scene involving leeches, and the leeches were black licorice that kept sliding off the table. McTavish had a fight scene with a camera mounted to him which was really uncomfortable. Verbeek loved a scene not in the novel involving ritual. Menzies had to have a scene talking to the missing Claire when he was talking to a standing stone.

5. Casting Claire was like finding Scarlett O’Hara.

They initially thought Jamie would be the hard part to find. Ironically, it was the other way around, and Claire was tough. They went to the pile of what agents originally didn’t want to send them to find Claire. Moore calls Balfe’s audition clip as a lighting moment when everyone knew she was it.

6. Gabaldon trusted in the casting and changes to novel.

Despite the fact that Sam Hueghan’s IMDB photos, in her opinion, did him no justice, Gabaldon felt Sam was it once she saw his tape. She felt the dynamic relationship of Claire and Jamie was absolutely reached in the production. In the translation to the new media Diana “fell in love with them every time I saw them.” She understands that various scenes from her book had to change sequence, be expanded, or be cut due to the new medium. Diana Gabaldon said Ron Moore’s script was the only time someone had proposed an adaptation of her work that didn’t want to make her blow up or burst into flame.

7. Tobias Menzies on playing 2 parts

Tobias Menzies found it surprisingly easy to play two parts. Each was so different and similar: Two men marked by war in unique ways. Part of making it easier for him is the costuming that helps body stance and posture.

8. Did the cast know what they were getting into?

Sam Hueghan had no idea initially what he was getting into, and then he discovered the Twitter and Facebook fans. He’s found it really positive and motivating, especially when fans come up to him on the street. Caitriona Balfe hasn’t found it intimidating because everyone will always have their own version of Claire. She hopes she does her version justice in people’s eyes. Both Hueghan and Balfe decided not to force their character’s relationships and let it evolve organically via acting chemistry.

9. Costumes.

Lotte Verbeek loves her layers and what she wears. They were warm which helped in Scotland. She felt bad that Caitriona had to do the whole first episode in a thin dress. Graham McTavish loves the kilts and period wear. He wishes they could dress with such stately elegance today. The plaid in the 18th century was 13 feet of cloth. It was everything between shelter, sleeping bag, to clothing.

10. Will the TV show capture men and women?

Gabaldon thinks of her books as without category though perhaps historical fiction is closest. Ron Moore was a fan from the word go, “I don’t think of it as a man’s show or a woman’s show. It’s just a ripping good yarn.”

You can catch the first episode of Outlander online at Starz for free starting August 2 at the network’s website and on their YouTube channel.

Iwan Rheon has been cast as Maximus in Marvel’s upcoming ABC series, Inhumans.

Iwan Rheon will star as Maximus, an integral member of the Inhuman royal family. As the brother of the Inhuman king Black Bolt, Maximus holds considerable power in the alien city of Attilan. Charming and clever, he is exceptionally loyal to his people.

But unsurprisingly to those familiar with Rheon’s body of work, Maximus also hides darker ambitions — including taking the throne from Black Bolt.

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Iwan Rheon has been cast as Maximus in Marvel’s upcoming ABC series, Inhumans.

Iwan Rheon will star as Maximus, an integral member of the Inhuman royal family. As the brother of the Inhuman king Black Bolt, Maximus holds considerable power in the alien city of Attilan. Charming and clever, he is exceptionally loyal to his people.

But unsurprisingly to those familiar with Rheon’s body of work, Maximus also hides darker ambitions — including taking the throne from Black Bolt.

Iwan Rheon is best known for his terrifying turn as Ramsay Bolton in HBO’s Game of Thrones. He has starred in the British series Misfits and Vicious, and may never play a hero again in his life.

Marvel’s head of television Jeph Loeb, who also serves as an executive producer on Inhumans, suggests that those villainous skills will be well-deployed in the role of Maximus.

“Iwan’s ability to be charming, roguish, and still completely unexpectedly dangerous were all the different sides we needed to bring the character to life,” Loeb says. “We’re thrilled to have him on board.”

Showrunner Scott Buck agrees.

“Maximus is a complex character. Likable, charming, tragic and villainous all in the same moment,” he says, “And I’m very excited to have someone of Iwan’s considerable talent.”

Marvel’s Inhumans will be produced in partnership with IMAX. The first two episodes will screen in IMAX theaters before the show’s network debut in mid September. Spanning the course of eight episodes, the series will tell the story of the Inhuman royal family, with the associated drama that just happens when you’re a family of aliens with magical powers trying to rule a secret city.

A leaked cast list for Inhumans hinted at a complex lineup of characters, including Black Bolt’s wife Medusa and her sister Crystal. Karnak, as well as the three-legged horse Gorgon and amphibious Triton round out the eclectic cast. And with Iwan Rheon in place as Maximus, it seems like just a matter of time before the rest of the family falls into line.

What do you think of Iwan Rheon as Maximus in Marvel’s ‘Inhumans’?

Tags: inhumans, Marvel

Disney’s released a minute-long clip from Beauty and the Beast, and it’s a great one: Emma Watson performing “Belle.”

Belle skips around town as the townspeople observe the “funny girl” in this uplifting sequence from the movie. You can’t help but get excited for Beauty and the Beast after watching this, and Emma sounds great!

Read full article

Disney’s released a minute-long clip from Beauty and the Beast, and it’s a great one: Emma Watson performing “Belle.”

Belle skips around town as the townspeople observe the “funny girl” in this uplifting sequence from the movie. You can’t help but get excited for Beauty and the Beast after watching this, and Emma sounds great!

In related news, the cast and crew kicked off their press tour today in Paris. Disney released the following adorable photo of Emma Watson, Dan Stevens, Josh Gad, Luke Evans, director Bill Condon and composer Alan Menken as they start publicizing the movie, which opens in theaters March 17:

Can’t wait to see it!

Why you should be watching ‘The Missing’

3:00 pm EST, February 20, 2017

If I had to describe The Missing in one word, it would be novelistic. The story is something very much like a novel, each episode puts you one chapter deeper into the mystery. Just like a novel you cannot put down, this show is the ultimate binge watch.

Overview

The first season of The Missing follows a British couple whose son is kidnapped in a small town in France. Season 2 takes the same detective (and only connection from one season to the other) to Germany where a teen girl suddenly reappears after being kidnapped 11 years earlier.

Along with the riveting plots and twists of this show, here are some other reasons you should check it out:

Read full article

If I had to describe The Missing in one word, it would be novelistic. The story is something very much like a novel, each episode puts you one chapter deeper into the mystery. Just like a novel you cannot put down, this show is the ultimate binge watch.

Overview

The first season of The Missing follows a British couple whose son is kidnapped in a small town in France. Season 2 takes the same detective (and only connection from one season to the other) to Germany where a teen girl suddenly reappears after being kidnapped 11 years earlier.

Along with the riveting plots and twists of this show, here are some other reasons you should check it out:

Multiple time lines

Why keep it simple when we can jump forwards and backwards in time? The Missing is a big fan of telling the story out of order, which only allows for more guessing, more cliffhangers, and more opportunity to throw us off its track.

As complicated and heart wrenching missing persons cases are, to only tell the story during one stretch of time would minimize it. Season 1 is able to jump between timelines showing how the kidnapping of their son tore a couple apart and became the obsession for the husband.

Season 2 takes it a step further and jumps between a handful of timelines, and countries. The novelistic feel this show presents shines through these multiple timelines by not giving us clues immediately, but rather slowly unraveling it all.

Diversity in countries and languages

Yes, there are subtitles for non-French/German/any language other than English, but The Missing mixes it in well enough where it isn’t too often. It’s refreshing to see a mystery unravel over a variety of countries and cities. It complicates the story just enough where guessing the perpetrator isn’t too easy.

It’s visually enticing

Creators (and brothers) Harry and Jack Williams wrote both seasons, and chose to keep the same director for all episodes of each season. This ties the story together visually. Season 2 primarily takes place in Germany, in the middle of winter, while also taking a side trip to Iraq. Although two completely different countries visually, the juxtaposition of the two blends perfectly. From Iraq where it is a fast pace danger of being in a war zone, to a quiet but painful Germany.

Season 2 of The Missing is currently airing on Starz