Exclusive

The latest in our series of exclusive Lizzie Bennet Diaries interviews – Hypable spoke to The LBD Transmedia Producer Jay Bushman about his recent Streamys win, his work on the show, and what transmedia is all about, anyway.

It’s been Lizzie Bennet Diaries mania here on Hypable. Last week we brought you the first in our series of interviews, with the stars of the show:

Mary Kate Wiles: part one, part two | Ashley Clements: part one, part two

Now it’s time to look behind the scenes at one of the most innovative and interactive elements of this Pride and Prejudice adaptation – the use of transmedia. So what is transmedia all about? We decided to go straight to the source – to Jay Bushman, Transmedia Producer on The Lizzie Bennet Diaries.

Hypable’s Exclusive interview with Jay Bushman

Hypable: First, congratulations on your early win at The Streamy Awards. The Lizzie Bennet Diaries won Best Interactive Program, how does that feel?

Jay Bushman: The Streamy Award, along with the IAWTV [for Best Interactive/Social Media Experience] award last month, is hugely gratifying. Especially since I’ve spent – and still spend – a lot of time trying to convince skeptical producers and executives that this kind of storytelling is workable, powerful, engaging and worth the effort. So this kind of validation from the community is incredible and humbling. And I hope it’s a sign that more people will want to explore this kind of storytelling in the future.

It’s also nice because now I can relax during the actual ceremony and cheer on the rest of the team nominated in the other categories.

[Authors note: The Lizzie Bennet Diaries also picked up the Streamy for Best Writing: Comedy (for Bernie Su)]

What is your definition of ‘transmedia’?

Alas, that’s actually a really complicated subject. We have a joke – put two transmedia creators in a room and pretty soon they’ll have three definitions of transmedia. But the short version is “telling stories over multiple platforms.” The term encompasses many different variations on that.

The two big ones are: 1) multiple standalone stories on multiple types of media that all are connected to the same storyworld – Star Wars or The Matrix are good examples of that, and 2) telling a single cohesive story over several different channels, which is the style of transmedia that we use. These two different branches of transmedia have a lot in common, but they also face unique and separate challenges, which is one of the things that I think leads to the term being so confusing.

I tend to fall into the second category; I’m mainly interested in single stories that come at you from multiple directions. I also find the term “transmedia” to be inherently limiting – it implies value in the simple number of different platforms that get used, rather than the unique story qualities of moving a story around over a number of digital channels. It leads to checklist thinking, that in order to have a “real transmedia” project, there’s some threshold of number of platforms that have to be used.

I fully expect the term transmedia to be superseded at some point by something else. We just don’t have that term yet. But in the future, I think we’ll look back at the word as something like “kinescope” or “zoetrope” – an archaic term used for a short period of time as an evolutionary step towards something much bigger.

But for now, transmedia is the term we have, and it’s the way I describe what I do so I can get hired for work.

How did you become involved with The Lizzie Bennet Diaries? Whose idea was it to include all of the transmedia elements?

I’ve known Bernie [Su, co-creator, executive producer, head writer and director] for several years, and we’d been looking for a way to work together. Back in 2011, I saw him at the first Storyworld Conference – a convention for transmedia and multi-platform storytellers – and he told me that it gave him a bunch of ideas. I had already been developing a modern take on Pride and Prejudice, but had stalled a bit on cracking the adaptation and had put it aside.

Early in 2012, when a mutual friend found out that Bernie was doing LBD and wanted to add some transmedia elements, she suggested that he reach out to me. Bernie gave me the rundown on the concept, and I jumped at the chance to join the team. It was a perfect fit.

Who decides which storylines are included on the various social media platforms you use?

Everything starts in the writer’s room. We break the stories for each arc, and decide what belongs on camera and what doesn’t. For major story beats, I’ll look at what ends up in the episodes and try to find ways that transmedia can complement the action, show viewers what’s going on from a different perspective of characters who don’t belong on camera at that point, or ways to bridge episodes together. I’ll discuss ideas with Alex [Edwards, transmedia editor] and Bernie and we’ll decide on a course of action.

For some of the other transmedia elements, individual people have a certain amount of autonomy to decide what to do in the moment. Rachel [Kiley, writer for The LBD and spinoff The Lydia Bennet] does a fantastic job with Lydia’s tweets and her choices of which to mark as favorites. Alex has control of Gigi’s music choices, and has used them to tell a great story about that character’s evolution, even before she ever appeared on screen. I had the idea for Caroline’s Thanksgiving ordeal the night before, and I wrote it on the spot.

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Some awesome celebrities turned out today to support the Women’s March on Washington movement, in order to send a strong message to the Trump administration that women’s rights are human rights!

Massive crowds all over the world today are taking part in the Women’s March to send a message about women’s rights. Here at Hypable we give a big shout out to all of those taking a stand today. To show that you’re not alone in this fight, here’s a look at some of the celebrities who were among the estimated four million marchers who showed up to support you in D.C. and all over the world.

Emma Watson and Bonnie Wright

Read full article

Some awesome celebrities turned out today to support the Women’s March on Washington movement, in order to send a strong message to the Trump administration that women’s rights are human rights!

Massive crowds all over the world today are taking part in the Women’s March to send a message about women’s rights. Here at Hypable we give a big shout out to all of those taking a stand today. To show that you’re not alone in this fight, here’s a look at some of the celebrities who were among the estimated four million marchers who showed up to support you in D.C. and all over the world.

Emma Watson and Bonnie Wright

Kristen Stewart

Charlize Theron

Madonna

Nick Offerman

Sir Ian McKellen

Candice King, Julie Plec and Kayla Ewell

Mindy Kaling

A photo posted by Mindy Kaling (@mindykaling) on

Darren Criss and Nick Lang

Melissa Benoist

💪#womensmarchonwashington

A photo posted by Melissa Benoist (@melissabenoist) on

Misha Collins

#womansmarch Jacksonville, FL. Fight on!

A photo posted by Misha Collins (@misha) on

Aja Naomi King and Alfred Enoch

Resistance. Respect. #womensmarch 👊🏾

A photo posted by Aja King (@ajanaomi_king) on

Lin-Manuel Miranda

Joss Whedon

Edgar Wright

Miley Cyrus

Ariana Grande

today filled my heart with so much hope !! got to meet many beautiful, passionate people and march alongside my loved ones. the sun came out for us. we are so much stronger and louder than hatred, ignorance, sexism, racism, agism, homophobia, transphobia, body shaming, slut shaming, prejudice, discrimination of all kinds, patriarchal conditioning and the backwards expectations of what a woman should be! I'm so proud of / inspired by everyone who marched today and thankful that there are so many people on this planet currently celebrating how brilliant and magical women truly are! let's keep our voices loud, passionate & peaceful! let's continue being strong for each other and to build each other up! let us stay connected to our divinity. 🌸♡🌌

A photo posted by Ariana Grande (@arianagrande) on

John Legend

#WomensMarch

A photo posted by John Legend (@johnlegend) on

Chrissy Teigen and America Ferrara

Dame Helen Mirren

Gillian Anderson

Bryan Fuller

Neil Gaiman

Kerry Washington with Natalie Portman

… and with Laverne Cox

Ben Barnes

Amy Schumer and Uzo Aduba

A photo posted by @amyschumer on

Gina Rodriguez

Carlos Valdes, Arthur Darvill, Danielle Panabaker, Caity Lotz and Keiynan Lonsdale

Maggie and Jake Gyllenhaal

Kevin McHale

Chris Colfer

Scarlett Johansson

Blake Lively

Yoko Ono and Whoopi Goldberg

Jessica Chastain

Alicia Keys and Janelle Monae

Katy Perry

Zendaya

That's right…

A photo posted by Zendaya (@zendaya) on

Troye Sivan

Willow Smith

Mark Ruffalo

Yip. Well said. Borrowed sign from @dorisfullgrabe design by @dirtybandits #womensmarch Nyc

A photo posted by Mark Ruffalo (@markruffalo) on

Paul Bettany

Eddie Izzard

Stephen Colbert

Did you turn out to support the Women’s March?

Even though we’re halfway through Lucifer season 2, God has only ever been mentioned by name, so we haven’t seen what he looks like — yet.

God has been a major player in Lucifer since the pilot episode, but we’ve never seen his face. Despite what a huge influence he’s had on all of Lucifer’s existence, the show has understandably continued to keep him a mystery (though we did wonder when we’d be seeing him).

But now, according to EW, Timothy Omundson (Psych, Galavant) has been cast in the role of God Johnson.

Read full article

Even though we’re halfway through Lucifer season 2, God has only ever been mentioned by name, so we haven’t seen what he looks like — yet.

God has been a major player in Lucifer since the pilot episode, but we’ve never seen his face. Despite what a huge influence he’s had on all of Lucifer’s existence, the show has understandably continued to keep him a mystery (though we did wonder when we’d be seeing him).

But now, according to EW, Timothy Omundson (Psych, Galavant) has been cast in the role of God Johnson.

They don’t specifically say Omundson will be playing the God, but EW reports he is “a patient in a psychiatric hospital, who is charming, enigmatic, and oh yeah, he thinks he’s the one and only God Almighty.”

Lucifer will certainly take issue with someone impersonating any divine being, let alone his father.

However, EW also says, “As Lucifer (Tom Ellis) tries to prove him a phony, he comes to find that ‘God Johnson’ seems to know things that only Lucifer’s true Father would know. Could he really be the Big Guy Upstairs?”

The trick will be to figure out if God Johnson is the real deal or if someone else is feeding him information to lure Lucifer out. At this point, it could be just about anybody — Charlotte, Amenadiel, the man in the hat, or a player we’ve yet to meet.

Omundson has been signed on for only one episode, but that doesn’t necessarily mean we’ll never see him again.

Are you excited Timothy Omundson has been added to ‘Lucifer‘?

At a time when the divide between the generations has arguably never been greater, The 100 encapsulates the struggle of millennials more than any other current show.

This article was submitted by Hypable reader Stephanie Farnsworth.

The media churns out article after article about the laziness of millennials, and then complains about how we work too hard. Millennials are branded “snowflakes” even as we struggle to pay rent and bear the consequences of the economic fall-out that we didn’t cause.

Read full article

At a time when the divide between the generations has arguably never been greater, The 100 encapsulates the struggle of millennials more than any other current show.

This article was submitted by Hypable reader Stephanie Farnsworth.

The media churns out article after article about the laziness of millennials, and then complains about how we work too hard. Millennials are branded “snowflakes” even as we struggle to pay rent and bear the consequences of the economic fall-out that we didn’t cause.

The CW drama The 100, which is entering its fourth season in February, rather bluntly captures that sense of young people paying the price of previous generations; at the beginning of the series, a council of adult politicians literally sent teenagers to a radiation-soaked earth to try to save their own society.

The 100 season 1 Jaha

The pilot episode revealed the extent of the power imbalance between the generations that reflects our society today: Chancellor Jaha presented the project of ‘the hundred’ as a way for young delinquents to fulfil their duty and gain redemption, even if it cost them their lives. They were even expected to be grateful, because they’d been judged as criminals and would have been executed anyway, even for relatively petty crimes.

And as The 100 season 4 approaches, the adults’ attitudes towards the kids haven’t changed that much from the show’s premiere.

Related: Previewing The 100 season 4: What to expect when you’re expecting an apocalypse

Generational conflict and tension has remained at the heart of the show throughout the series. The generational focus has not been diluted even as the world has expanded to reveal far more of the culture of the Grounders; in fact, this has only given rise to more conflict as the older members of Skaikru have struggled to accept not only the Grounders’ belief system, but the young age of their Commanders.

As the figurehead for all of the delinquents, lead character Clarke has been undermined and derided at every turn. In season 2, her own mother scoffed at the idea that Clarke and Lexa could lead their people to safety, mocking the Grounder Commander’s age and commenting, “They’re being led by a child.” It was up to Kane to point out that Skaikru were, too, because none of the adults had managed to think of a solution, and it was up to Clarke to save them.

Both Abby and Kane’s attitudes play into the infantilising of the millennial generation. Neither Clarke nor Lexa were children. They were young adults, and they were working towards making a better society where all of their people could survive while the adults were focused on internal power plays. Jaha was ready to leave the young adults in Mount Weather to die, but that’s no surprise; he’d made that decision before.

Abby couldn’t bear losing power to her own daughter, to the extent that it culminated in a scene where she assaulted Raven. The young mechanic was cool and composed in her response, pointing out that Clarke stopped being a child when Abby signed off on her daughter being sent to Earth to die.

Raven’s positioning was clear: Although not condemned by any crimes (even if she had committed the crime that Finn was convicted of), she chose to align herself with the hundred and was the one who chose to come to Earth simply to help. The younger generation, in short, pulled together, and when the older generation landed they brought down their old rules and oppression.

The consequences were overwhelming for the younger characters. They were tasked with saving everyone at the expense of any peace to their own souls. Clarke demonstrated this more than any other character and she ended up fleeing her people, unable to carry the burden of expectation they all had for her. It’s something she wrestled with throughout season 3, and with Earth facing a nuclear apocalypse again, Clarke will have to make peace — not with herself, but with how everyone else sees her if she is to survive.

The 100 season 4 Bellamy

Bellamy, too, will have to find his own identity. Last season, he effectively turned his back on the hundred to win the praise of Pike, and Bellamy upheld and supported his bigotry.

His part in slaughtering the Ark survivors’ 300 Grounder allies will not be easily forgotten. Bellamy wanted to be the hero. He wanted to protect people (specifically the women in his life) who never asked for that, and he wanted to be a part of the establishment.

If The 100 presents a metaphor for the real-life relationship between millennials and Gen X, Bellamy is the one wearing the rose-tinted glasses that younger people are supposed to wear when viewing an establishment that has been willing to regularly criticise later generations.

He had longed to be part of the Guard since he was a boy, and he saw a way to fulfil that old dream and become part of an order that had caused his entire family so much suffering. Bellamy was never quite the hundred: He was older, and his sole concern initially had been protecting his sister. It was easier for him to flit between the different groups within Skaikru than it was for any of the rest of the hundred.

After the events of last season, however, Bellamy now knows the pain he’s caused by his choices. And in season 4, he will have to choose exactly who to put his faith in: Clarke or the old order?

But maybe, in light of the external threat that now threatens humanity’s survival, the two generations will finally be able to pull together. There have been many hints that Clarke and Jaha will find some common ground this season due to the pressures they are facing, and Jaha knows well the cost of leading. Through Clarke, we will see whether lessons can be learned from the mistakes of the generation before.

Octavia once accused Clarke of being just like the council by deciding who was worthy of life. Clarke now must show whether she will follow that path or whether she can be better. The millennial dream of whether we can learn from the repression and conservatism of the past will be on trial in The 100 season 4, as we see just how Clarke plans to lead her friends into this new battle.

The 100‘ season 4 premieres February 1 at 9/8c on The CW