The ultimate guide to Joss Whedon, entitled Joss Whedon: The Complete Companion: The TV Series, the Movies, the Comic Books and More, was released May 1. Read an excerpt now!

The almost 500-page-long book is a collection of essays on all aspects of Joss Whedon’s work (including the recently premiered The Avengers), and features contributions by Jane Espenson and Tim Minear. Hypable has received a copy of this book, and you can expect a full review soon.

For now, read the excerpt released by Movies.com, from one of the essays talking about Buffy the Vampire Slayer:

Joss Whedon 101: Buffy The Vampire Slayer (The Movie)

Laura Berger

The 1997 television series Buffy the Vampire Slayer is often cited as an “unlikely” critical darling. The title didn’t exactly inspire confidence, nor did the fact that the cast was led by former soap star Sarah Michelle Gellar. Perhaps most damning was the show’s affiliation with a poorly received film released five years prior—a film of the same name and premise.

The earliest incarnation of Buffy is something that many fans would like to forget; indeed, even Joss Whedon, screenwriter of the film and creator behind the series, is adamant about the fact that the film should not be considered part of the Buffy canon. Whedon has (repeatedly and publicly) voiced his disappointment with the film, which was not representative of his original screenplay. Viewers agree. The film has a score of 32 percent at Rotten Tomatoes; 11 “fresh” reviews are eclipsed by the 23 “rotten” ones (“Buffy”).

For most fans of the show, the movie is embarrassing. Diehard fans of the series have more success convincing people who haven’t seen the movie to watch the show because they don’t have preconceived notions (except the silly title, its affiliation with the WB, a teen-oriented network, the fact that it is science fiction and fantasy… etc.). In any case, introductions to Buffy are met with less resistance when the person in question hasn’t seen the film.

Many hardcore fans of the show do not rewatch the movie often—or at all. These same fans cringe whenever it’s mentioned, but interestingly, the details of the film are unfamiliar to them. They unceasingly criticize the film, but when they do watch it, they discover they still can’t summarize details of the storylines or comment on the characters. Merrick, Pike, Lothos—the characters that comprise the movie’s cast of characters are decidedly less memorable than the indelible Giles, Spike, and Angel.

The film begins with a flashback to Europe sometime in “The Dark Ages” (characterization is not the only area in which the film lacks specificity). A voiceover sets the stage: “Since the dawn of time, the vampires have walked among us, killing, feeding. The only one with the strength or skill to stop their heinous evil is the Slayer. She who bears the birthmark, the mark of the coven.” The Slayer is trained by the Watcher, and when one Slayer dies, the next is chosen. We are then introduced to Buffy, a blonde high school student, a cheerleader by day who will soon become—albeit reluctantly—a vampire Slayer by night. The fate of the world rests on Buffy’s (Kristy Swanson) shoulders. She’s passionate about shopping and gossiping and seems like an entirely unlikely candidate for superpowers.

The movie chronicles Buffy’s transformation from an unlikeable airhead into a powerful hero. By the film’s conclusion, we are cheering for Buffy; that being said, there is nothing remarkable about her besides her birthright. We want her to succeed, but we don’t feel particularly connected to her. Swanson’s Buffy lacks Sarah Michelle Gellar’s vulnerability and seriousness—her depth. Gellar is an anchor in the series; whether she’s facing witches, prom dogs, or ghosts, she manages to keep the show grounded. Imprisoned by her calling and negotiating the warzones of adolescence and the Hellmouth, Gellar’s Buffy is a Slayer and a person, whereas Swanson comes across as somewhat of a caricature.

This seems less the fault of Swanson than of the project itself. The film doesn’t bask in its silliness (except for one memorably amusing death scene) or dare to take its subject matter seriously, so it’s rarely funny or moving. It lacks any semblance of conviction; it doesn’t know what it is or even what it’s striving to be. There is a main villain—Lothos—but we don’t really know what he wants (other than to kill Buffy).

Some of the movie is unintentionally hilarious. Hilary Swank makes her first appearance on film as Buffy’s frenemy Kimberly. Swank is clad in cut-off vests and wears scunchies (unironically!); nothing in her performance suggests that she would go on to become a two-time Oscar winner. David Arquette “acts” as an immature and asinine sidekick, and Luke Perry plays a teenager—not at all convincingly. Perry was in his 30s when the film was released. We’re also supposed to believe that Buffy’s popular friends find Luke Perry’s character (Pike) unappealing and inappropriate boyfriend material for Buffy (as if superficial teenage girls would reject Luke Perry—Luke Perry in the ‘90s with a leather jacket, no less).

Donald Sutherland’s performance as Buffy’s Watcher Merrick is deeply unsettling; he seems less like a mentor and more like a predator. When Merrick first approaches Buffy and tells her that she is the Slayer and demands that she come with him to a graveyard, Buffy accuses him of being “a skanky old [man] who attacks little girls and stuff.” Merrick never loses the skanky old man aura. There is nothing paternal about Sutherland’s portrayal, and he seems ready to open his trench coat at any moment. Skanky indeed.

The film is sort of like an embarrassing picture from your adolescence that you want to hide. Burning it would be bad luck and a mite too dramatic. The portrait means something, in its own painfully awkward way. But there are traces—however faint—of what Buffy would go on to become: a rare example of a strong female character, an iconic hero. The movie is Buffy in braces. Buffy as raw cookie dough.

Works Cited

Buffy the Vampire Slayer. Writ. Joss Whedon. Dir. Fran Rubel Kuzui. Perf. Kristy Swanson, Donald Sutherland, Paul Reubens, and Luke Perry. Twentieth Century Fox Home Entertainment, 2001. DVD.

Buffy the Vampire Slayer (1992).” Rotten Tomatoes Web. 20 Oct. 2011.

90 minutes into an embarrassing year for the MTV VMAs, a bright light appeared: Beyoncé.

Beyoncé’s 2016 MTV VMA performance may go down as one of the best in the award show’s history. The Lemonade singer flawlessly moved through “Pray You Catch Me,” “Hold Up,” “Sorry,” “Don’t Hurt Yourself” (featuring a Cruella de Vil-like wardrobe), and “Formation,” each with their own themes and stunning visuals. (That fire! That broken camera! The feminism!)

Watch Beyoncé’s full 2016 MTV VMA performance below:

Read full article

90 minutes into an embarrassing year for the MTV VMAs, a bright light appeared: Beyoncé.

Beyoncé’s 2016 MTV VMA performance may go down as one of the best in the award show’s history. The Lemonade singer flawlessly moved through “Pray You Catch Me,” “Hold Up,” “Sorry,” “Don’t Hurt Yourself” (featuring a Cruella de Vil-like wardrobe), and “Formation,” each with their own themes and stunning visuals. (That fire! That broken camera! The feminism!)

Watch Beyoncé’s full 2016 MTV VMA performance below:

The performance was a bit of a surprise. Though MTV hinted that she’d be showing up, no one expected a 15-minute performance.

The 2016 MTV VMAs were disappointing to say the least. The first two award winners — the only two awards presented in the first 2 hours of the show — weren’t present to receive them (Drake was apparently stuck in traffic, according to P Diddy).

And peppered throughout the performances were Key and Peele, who were playing commentators who just mocked millennials and their lingo. Bizarre, when you realize that they’re just making fun of the show’s core audience for hours.

Then Britney Spears had to follow Beyoncé with a performance of “Make Me” with G-Eazy. Poor Britney! No one should have to follow a Beyoncé performance like the one above.

It’s funny how Beyoncé feels compelled to perform at the garbage that are the MTV VMAs. They don’t deserve her. There are only two legitimate reasons why she could be interested in doing this: To inspire, and to promote the Formation World Tour.

Marvel reveals what Thor was really up to during ‘Civil War’ in amazing new video

"And who's this purple weirdo?"

3:38 pm EDT, August 28, 2016

Have you found yourself curious about just where Thor ended up whilst his team mates were duking it out during Captain America: Civil War? Well, wonder no longer, as Marvel has finally revealed the truth.

We’ve all mulled the question over in our heads, since the line-up for Civil War was revealed. Where were Thor and Bruce Banner hiding out whilst the Sokovia Accords were tearing their team apart?

The answer was revealed in a mockumentary clip, directed by Thor: Ragnarok helmer Taika Waititi, which debuted during San Diego Comic-Con this past summer — where it received an enthusiastic response. But, for those fans left at home, and without a coveted seat in Hall H, the answer still remained painfully out of reach.

Read full article

Have you found yourself curious about just where Thor ended up whilst his team mates were duking it out during Captain America: Civil War? Well, wonder no longer, as Marvel has finally revealed the truth.

We’ve all mulled the question over in our heads, since the line-up for Civil War was revealed. Where were Thor and Bruce Banner hiding out whilst the Sokovia Accords were tearing their team apart?

The answer was revealed in a mockumentary clip, directed by Thor: Ragnarok helmer Taika Waititi, which debuted during San Diego Comic-Con this past summer — where it received an enthusiastic response. But, for those fans left at home, and without a coveted seat in Hall H, the answer still remained painfully out of reach.

Until now.

Released in anticipation of the Civil War DVD and Blu-ray release, this short is now available to the masses, and we couldn’t happier — not least because it’s just as hilarious as promised.

Team Thor

See what Thor was up to during Captain America Civil War! Get this and other bonus on Digital HD 9/2. http://bit.ly/293rlyS

Posted by Marvel Studios on Sunday, 28 August 2016

 

That’s right. As Tony and Steve were duking it out, Thor was Down Under, chilling with his new buddy Darryl and engaging in a little community service.

It’s definitely worth checking out for yourself, and we won’t spoil any of the more hilarious touches — especially some of Thor’s… artistic interpretations of certain Avengers team members. We’re definitely not going to be able to look at Nick Fury in the same way, ever again.

(Also, if you’ve been having difficulty tracking the Infinity Stones, Thor has the perfect solution for you!)

Rest assured that, if this mockumentary is anything to go by, Thor: Ragnarok is in very capable hands. We’re certainly looking forward to a Rainbow road bridge-tripping adventure across the universe with Thor and Hulk.

Especially if it allows Chris Hemsworth to show off more of his comedy chops, as seen in the above clip.

Captain America: Civil War is released in Digital HD on September 2, and on Blu-ray and DVD on September 13. Thor: Ragnarok will be heading to theaters on November 3, 2017.

Which ‘team’ are you on now? Team Cap, Team Iron Man, or… Team Thor?

The upcoming 25th anniversary edition of Disney’s Beauty and the Beast includes a couple of first looks at next year’s live-action adaptation.

It’s hard to believe, but it’s been a quarter of a century since the animated Beauty and the Beast hit movie theaters. To celebrate the occasion Disney is putting out an anniversary edition, and its special features section includes a treat: Our first look at Cogsworth and Lumière in the live-action installment, as well as a glimpse of a scene within Gaston’s tavern.

As confirmed by producer Jack Morrissey on Facebook, this photo of Cogsworth (played by Ian McKellen) and Lumière (Ewan McGregor) is concept art, but it gives us a sense of the style that director Bill Condon is shooting for:

Read full article

The upcoming 25th anniversary edition of Disney’s Beauty and the Beast includes a couple of first looks at next year’s live-action adaptation.

It’s hard to believe, but it’s been a quarter of a century since the animated Beauty and the Beast hit movie theaters. To celebrate the occasion Disney is putting out an anniversary edition, and its special features section includes a treat: Our first look at Cogsworth and Lumière in the live-action installment, as well as a glimpse of a scene within Gaston’s tavern.

As confirmed by producer Jack Morrissey on Facebook, this photo of Cogsworth (played by Ian McKellen) and Lumière (Ewan McGregor) is concept art, but it gives us a sense of the style that director Bill Condon is shooting for:

cogsworth-lumiere-live-action-beauty-and-the-beast

While it’s nice to finally see a glimpse of a couple of the characters, a big question remains unanswered: How will these objects look once they have faces on them? (Cogsworth’s face might be hinted at in the center of the clock.)

Also on the Beauty and the Beast 25th Anniversary Edition is a shot from the the “Gaston” musical number. From left to right we see Alexis Loizon as Stanley, Josh Gad as LeFou (just over Gaston’s shoulder), and Luke Evans (with his back to the camera) as Gaston.

live-action-beauty-and-the-beast-gaston

Update: And here’s another look at the movie, courtesy of this person on Twitter — this time we get to see Dan Stevens as human Beast!

human-beast-dan-stevens

We’ll be curious to get our hands on the anniversary edition in September, because we expect we’ll see more from the new movie than the two stills above.

Disney released the first trailer for the live-action Beauty and the Beast in May. It was very much a teaser trailer, as it didn’t provide any looks at the characters — except Belle (Emma Watson), appearing through the glass casing protecting the film’s iconic rose.

In fact, the trailer’s first looks at the various settings (Namely the Beast’s castle) fell in line with the visual style we see in the above concept art.

Beauty and the Beast starring Emma Watson and Dan Stevens hit theaters March 17, 2017.