Joel and Ethan Coen are an anomaly among filmmakers. Rarely can a creative team make so many acclaimed films that share so many similar parts but can be so different from one another.

While they have a shortlist of people who seem to be in every one of their movies (John Goodman, Frances McDormand, John Turturro, Steve Buscemi), they’ve also shown that they are adept at switching styles and genres at the blink of an eye, whether it be black comedy (Fargo, Burn After Reading), Crime (Blood Simple, Miller’s Crossing), or Western (No Country For Old Men, True Grit).

Their art is complete yet concise, with all but one of their films clocking in at under two hours (No Country being the exception). Inside Llewyn Davis finds them in a different, somber mindset, however. It’s still unmistakably a Coen Brothers film (Hi, John Goodman), but it’s melancholy, visually striking, and eminently likable and relatable due to its lead.

The movie takes place during a one week period of the life of Llewyn Davis (Oscar Issac), a folk singer in the 1960s Greenwich Village. Judging by that description, it’s easy to imagine what his life is probably like, which is to say, an unfulfilled mess. He drifts from apartment to apartment playing in dimly lit clubs while dealing with the suicide of his partner and unintentionally giving everyone around him new reasons to hate him. His ex-girlfriend Jean (Carey Mulligan) is apparently pregnant with his child, and he’s also stuck with one of his friends cats, since he can never find an opportune time to return it.

In his journey, he collaborates with Jean’s boyfriend Jim (Justin Timberlake) on a song, and joins two musicians (John Goodman and Garrett Hedlund) on their way to Chicago. But the film actually has the supporting cast take a major backseat for a change, with many of them only appearing for a short time. Rightfully so, as it is Llewyn’s story, which is where the strength of the film lies.

Llewyn is relatable to everyone, artist or not, because everyone has at one point felt his struggle. A character like this has the potential to be rather unlikable, but Issac’s performance keeps him within the audience’s sympathy. His life is a constant downward spiral, but apart from a few specific scenes, he keeps himself together in a dark, sardonic way. He’s an artist who is actually in it for the art, and the reason he hasn’t seen success is because he isn’t willing to sell out like his peers have, a fact exemplified by the scene where Llewyn and Jim record the song “Please, Mr. Kennedy,” a protest song about the space program, of all things, meant as just a quick cash for which he sacrifices his integrity just so he can survive.

Visually, the film is striking. Much of the color is taken away to create an almost sepia tone, which fits the bleak, melancholy atmosphere of the movie. It’s a lot like Nebraska, another beautiful, visually striking but hard to read film from 2013. The morals of Nebraska, however, might have been intentional due to the setting and the characters, but Llewyn’s seems slightly more complex due to the subtlety of the visuals, characters, and the ending, which basically accomplishes nothing.

Being a Coen Brothers film, the soundtrack deserves some praise. It finds them collaborating with producer T-Bone Burnett once again, who helped them make one of the most successful soundtracks of all time with O Brother, Where Art Thou? Much like O Brother, folk music is prevalent through the soundtrack, featuring a mix of re-recorded folk classics and original material, including “Please, Mr. Kennedy,” as mentioned above. And of course no modern day folk record would be complete without a dash of Mumford. Marcus Mumford (who happens to married to Carey Mulligan) is featured on a couple songs and is also the singing voice of Llewyn’s deceased partner, adding serious folk credibility to the experience.

Inside Llewyn Davis would be nothing without its lead and atmosphere, which contribute so much to having us feel what Llewyn is going through. The Coens, in their usual sardonic way, tell a tale of how disappointingly bad, and against all odds, things happen to good people.

A new Fifty Shades Darker trailer was released on Wednesday and ups the sexy for the sequel.

Ana and Christian are getting back together in the Fifty Shades of Grey sequel, but the former has a couple of new rules: No secrets, way less BDSM. Christian agrees, but new problems come to light: Is someone from the millionaire’s past haunting him?

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A new Fifty Shades Darker trailer was released on Wednesday and ups the sexy for the sequel.

Ana and Christian are getting back together in the Fifty Shades of Grey sequel, but the former has a couple of new rules: No secrets, way less BDSM. Christian agrees, but new problems come to light: Is someone from the millionaire’s past haunting him?

Dakota Johnson continues to bring a fun vibe to Ana Steele, playing the awkward lines with self awareness better than Kristen Stewart ever did as Bella in Twilight. “Have dinner with me,” Christian begs. “Okay fine, I will have dinner with you, because I’m… hungry,” Ana replies. The line could come off corny if executed poorly, but Dakota has a strong hold on playing this character for fun.

Tickets for Fifty Shades Darker are now on sale. Check out a new poster for the movie below:

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The Fifty Shades Darker synopsis reads, “When a wounded Christian Grey tries to entice a cautious Ana Steele back into his life, she demands a new arrangement before she will give him another chance. As the two begin to build trust and find stability, shadowy figures from Christian’s past start to circle the couple, determined to destroy their hopes for a future together.”

The movie hits theaters this Valentine’s Day. It stars Dakota Johnson, Jamie Dornan, Eric Johnson, Jennifer Ehle, Victor Rasuk, Luke Grimes, Rita Ora, Eloise Mumford, Max Martini, Bella Heathcote, Kim Basinger and Marcia Gay Harden, and is directed by James Foley.

It’s looking like Nick Robinson will go from battling dinosaurs to battling the process of coming out.

‘Simon vs. the Homo Sapiens Agenda’ actor revealed

According to The Hollywood Reporter, 21-year-old Nick Robinson is in talks to play Simon in the book to film adaptation of Simon vs. the Homo Sapiens Agenda written by Becky Albertalli. The movie will be directed by CW/DC Universe mastermind Greg Berlanti.

Nick Robinson is best known for his supporting role in Jurassic World, in which he played big brother Zach Mitchell. He also co-starred as Ben in the book to film adaptation of the dystopian novel The 5th Wave starring Chloe Moretz.

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It’s looking like Nick Robinson will go from battling dinosaurs to battling the process of coming out.

‘Simon vs. the Homo Sapiens Agenda’ actor revealed

According to The Hollywood Reporter, 21-year-old Nick Robinson is in talks to play Simon in the book to film adaptation of Simon vs. the Homo Sapiens Agenda written by Becky Albertalli. The movie will be directed by CW/DC Universe mastermind Greg Berlanti.

Nick Robinson is best known for his supporting role in Jurassic World, in which he played big brother Zach Mitchell. He also co-starred as Ben in the book to film adaptation of the dystopian novel The 5th Wave starring Chloe Moretz.

Simon vs. the Homo Sapiens Agenda is an excellent coming of age/coming out LGBT YA novel which we’ve raved about here on Hypable before. Nick Robinson is definitely an actor we can picture in the role, so we can’t wait to see him play the adorable character.

The film is being produced by Wyck Godfrey’s Temple Hill Entertainment, who’s responsible for The Maze Runner series, The Twilight Saga, and the upcoming Power Rangers.

What do think of Nick Robinson as Simon?

If you haven’t read it yet, we highly recommend that you do. The book was first published last year:

After you read it, be sure to check out our exclusive interview with Becky Albertalli. Simon was her first novel!

Netflix has unveiled a new Series of Unfortunate Events trailer, showing off Neil Patrick Harris’ excellent portrayal of the evil, wacky, will-stop-at-nothing-to-get-that-money Count Olaf.

Neil Patrick Harris’ ability to convincingly become any person — whether male or female, young or old, ugly or beautiful — becomes abundantly clear in the latest ASOUE trailer. While some of us may’ve been a little skeptical of his casting initially, it’s hard to imagine anyone else in the role after seeing previews like this.

The trailer begins with narrator Lemony Snicket (played by Patrick Warburton) warning that the new Netflix show is no delightful watch. Then the focus turns to Olaf and his mission to steal the children’s fortune, left to them by their parents after their untimely deaths:

Read full article

Netflix has unveiled a new Series of Unfortunate Events trailer, showing off Neil Patrick Harris’ excellent portrayal of the evil, wacky, will-stop-at-nothing-to-get-that-money Count Olaf.

Neil Patrick Harris’ ability to convincingly become any person — whether male or female, young or old, ugly or beautiful — becomes abundantly clear in the latest ASOUE trailer. While some of us may’ve been a little skeptical of his casting initially, it’s hard to imagine anyone else in the role after seeing previews like this.

The trailer begins with narrator Lemony Snicket (played by Patrick Warburton) warning that the new Netflix show is no delightful watch. Then the focus turns to Olaf and his mission to steal the children’s fortune, left to them by their parents after their untimely deaths:

The Unfortunate Events trailer also presents new looks at colorful characters including Uncle Monty (Aasif Mandvi, below), Aunt Josephine (Alfre Woodard, below), and Justice Strauss (Joan Cusack).

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A Series of Unfortunate Events premieres all eight episodes of its first season on January 13, 2017.

“Based on the internationally best-selling series of books by Lemony Snicket (aka Daniel Handler) and starring Emmy and Tony Award winner Neil Patrick Harris, A Series of Unfortunate Events recounts the tragic tale of the Baudelaire orphans — Violet, Klaus, and Sunny – whose evil guardian Count Olaf will stop at nothing to get his hands on their inheritance. The siblings must outsmart Olaf at every turn, foiling his many devious plans and disguises, in order to discover clues to their parents’ mysterious death.”

Another trailer was released two weeks ago — you can watch it here.

Is ‘Unfortunate Events’ looking as good as you hoped?

Harris previously confirmed that each book will be adapted into two episodes of the show. The first season of ASOUE covers the first four books, so presumably season 2 will roughly cover another four books. There are a total of 13 books in Lemony Snicket’s series.