So here’s the deal. We at Hypable have something very exciting that we want to announce in the next few days and we wanted to kick it off with a bit of fun. When three key members of the Hypable team sat down to talk through this exciting new development, all that we found ourselves talking about were our favorite movies.

So here we go, over the next three days, Myself, Jeremy Baril and Pat McCoy will take a few hours to tell you about our favorite films in the days leading to the announcement! Come join the fun!

So before we get into the nitty gritty of the movies that I would happily watch on my birthday, lets breeze through the honorable mentions because numbers are cruel and I can only include ten movies on a top ten list for some reason.

Honorable Mentions: Star Wars, Moulin Rouge, Reservoir Dogs, Pulp Fiction, Godfather Part II, Love Actually, Children of Men, Shaun of the Dead, Monty Python and the Holy Grail, Psycho, The Social Network, Jurassic Park, Gone With The Wind, Singin’ In The Rain, Billy Elliot

So there they are. I felt guilty playing favorites (I fear that some of those honorable mentions might think that I don’t love them!) but the following ten films are, without a doubt, my ten favorite films of all time. This week.

#10 O, Brother Where Art Thou?

This is a movie that I watched as soon as I found out that it existed a full five years after its release. I share my taste in movies with my grandmother, and when she recommended O Brother Where Art Thou to me, I admit that I dragged my shoes a little bit. It looked a little old timey and boring so it just didn’t catch my fancy. I couldn’t have been more wrong.

I finally caught it on an airplane a few years ago and disturbed everyone within a five row radius with my laughter. It’s brilliance mixed with illiteracy. The sheer contrast is enough to make anyone chuckle.

You can never go wrong with the Coen brothers, and O Brother Where Art Thou proves that point.  These guys can apparently take Homer’s The Odyssey and set it in the South during the Great Depression (and have it be comedy nonetheless)  and still make it a masterpiece. Sorry, did I just blow your mind? O Brother Where Art Thou is based off of The Odyssey all the way down to the Cyclops (remember the eye-patched John Goodman?) They even have Homer listed as a writer of the film, which is just adorable.

#9 The Big Lebowski

This is another one that I caught several years after everyone else already found out that it was cool. I guess that makes me a reverse hipster in a way. Anyway, I was the biggest loser in college for being the only one who hadn’t seen The Big Lebowski and when I finally sat down to watch it, I only got twenty minutes in. I just didn’t get it. When I finally watched it all the way through my first time, I thought it was okay, but I frankly couldn’t wait until it was over.

That’s when I developed my (non)famous The Big Lebowski theory that clearly states that you’ll find out exactly how good a comedy is once you have watched it three times. After my third time watching Lebowski, I finally got it. I don’t know what it was exactly that I got, but this film can’t go three lines without cracking me up now and it comes straight from the Coen’s tight and stylized writing style.

This film exploits every rule of comedy in the book and still closely follows traditional film noir traditions, making it (literally) a black comedy. There is something to be said about making a contemporary detective film that centers on the location of a rug. It’s a whole lot of something about nothing, and at the end of the day that spells comedy.

#8 Rear Window

Before you start thinking that this is just a Coen brothers party that no one else was invited to, let me throw in a wild card. Unless I’m wildly underestimating the cinematic literacy of our audience, many of you have not seen this film. This is not a bad thing. I’m not even mad, you just need to go out and rent it right now.

Rear Window is a claustrophobic examination of humans, humanity, and the insane Earth that we were all planted on. Largely regarded as one Hitchcock’s best, it broke pre-established conventions by taking place entirely inside the apartment of the protagonist. He watches the actions of his neighbors through the gigantic bay windows in the rear of his apartment because as his nurse tells him “we’ve become a race of peeping Toms.”

From nose to tail, this thing is packed with heavy lines carrying more than just their surface meaning. Hitchcock is famous for doing this, but this is one of those films that appears to be teaching you about humanity on top of presenting a genuinely thrilling tale about a man who appears to have murdered his wife.

#7 The Godfather

I know what you’re thinking. “Number seven? How can you put the masterpiece of masterpieces as number seven?!” Now, it would seem that no list of the best films of all time would be complete without the tale of the Corleones and maybe it was out of my attraction to non-conformity that I slid it down to number seven. I certainly consider it to be the greatest film of all time (as many do), but as a list of my personal favorites, there are some that take personal preference.

Still though, the film is a shining masterpiece and anyone who doesn’t like it simply has bad taste. I don’t like making enemies, but if you watched the whole thing all the way through and understood the story that it was telling and still didn’t like it then I don’t know what to say. “Rent Paul Blart: Mall Cop and cry yourself to sleep again, I guess” would probably be my advice to this person.

The Godfather is a timeless classic about family, crime, power, trust and betrayal. Every turn of the story, every look, every thought and every camera angle is orchestrated perfectly to beautifully tell a sweeping story of inheritance and family duty. The addition of Godfather II only deepened the story and filled it with a past rich enough to merit its predecessor and a future that would make Vito Corleone weep. The cast is filled with stars and the storytelling is immaculate. Go and buy this film. Don’t just rent it. Buy it at Target right now. I hear they have an deal on DVDs that’s pretty hard to refuse.

#6 Pirate Radio

I didn’t see Pirate Radio (or alternatively, The Boat That Rocked) until it finally came to the United States and I don’t see how Richard Curtis, the film’s writer and director hasn’t been heralded as one of the best filmmakers of the decade. Every film I’ve seen by him has been so lovingly crafted and so chock-full of fascinatingly unique characters that I don’t really understand why he isn’t currently swimming in work.

Pirate Radio is the perfect film to put on when you’re standing over your stack of DVDs stumped by what to put on. The plot isn’t too ridiculously complex, it instead chooses to focus on the characters and what rock and roll means to them. The soundtrack is electrifying and the dialogue is unbelievably funny. It is played for laughs from beginning to end, but like any Curtis feature there are small moments of biting reality that remind you that life (like the boat that everyone lives on) rocks frequently, and sinks on occasion.

Out of all the films on this list, I’ve seen Pirate Radio the most (probably at least 28 times) and it has not yet overstayed its welcome. I literally watched it three days ago while I cleaned my room and I still sang along to every song.

#5 Inglourious Basterds

As the final words of the film imply, Inglourious Basterds is Quentin Tarantino’s masterpiece.  I have a funny love/hate relationship with Tarantino. There is nothing about Kill Bill that I enjoy, yet Pulp Fiction is one of my favorites. Death Proof is pretty much an abomination, yet Reservoir Dogs was one of the best heist movies of its decade and it didn’t even feature a heist.

With Inglourious Basterds, Tarantino explored new ground with his first real period piece and he broke even further ground by actually casting people that fit their nationality. “Tom Cruise as a German? Just slap an eye patch on him and send him to makeup!” This logic doesn’t fly with Tarantino and he was very successful at getting genuine foreign celebrities to star in his film about internationality.

I own the script for Inglourious Basterds, and even though the movie is already one of my favorites, I’ve read the screenplay in its raw form three times. It’s just spectacularly written, superbly crafted, masterfully cast, has one of the best villains of all time and features brutal (sometimes horrific) Nazi killing. What else can a guy ask for?

#4 El Laberinto del Fauno

I know, I know, I know. I pick one foreign film and it’s the obvious one? Now don’t get me wrong, I’m not calling it by its original name to seem like an arrogant cinemaphile that eats caviar and swims in a pool filled with gold turnips. I kid you not, in video rental stores across the nation there is a red faced customer demanding to see someone’s manager for not giving them the “American” version of El Laberinto Del Fauno.

It’s in Spanish. It was meant to be in Spanish. It’s beautiful in Spanish. El Laberinto Del Fauno translates to “The Labyrinth of the faun”, not “Pan’s Labyrinth.” I get it, Pan (from Greek legend) is a faun, and there is definitely an awesome badass faun in the movie, but calling it Pan’s Labyrinth is like calling The Man Who Knew Too Much something like Jerry Knows Too Much. There’s no Jerry in the movie, so how does calling it Jerry Knows Too Much make any kind of sense?

The story is expansive and rich, the idea of mixing fantasy with history is infinitely thrilling and exploring the mind and imagination of a young girl as she deals with her new and extraordinary circumstance is both enchanting and tragic. The film flourished before our very eyes and captured the imagination of everyone who saw it, including the children that witnessed a bottle murder when they were unwittingly brought by their parents.

#3 Big Fish

Here’s the thing about my love for Big Fish. I watched the whole thing on television one day out of the blue. When it finally finished, I broke down crying. It was the most fantastic tale that had ever been spun before me, and since the entire film is about storytelling and what it can do for the sake of humanity it just was too much for my emotional purse to handle.

Each of the stories told are even more miraculous than the last, and the design of the film impeccably places us in the world that the film wants to tell us about. Big Fish is one of Tim Burton’s only films that isn’t all Tim Burton’ed out and the movie is his best because of that. It was a soaring tale of humanity and the final twenty minutes are some of the most touching minutes I have ever experienced while watching a movie.

Every time I watch this film now, I can’t help but cry. There’s an exact moment in an exact scene that gets me every time, and it’s when everyone shouts “he’s here!’ when Billy Crudup carries Albert Finney into the clearing by the lake. I’m tearing up now just thinking about it. Way to go, Big Fish, leave me alone already.

#2 American Beauty

Now this film, in my opinion, is the single greatest achievement in American film, and only because of how sharply and accurately it is able to reflect reality and harshly criticize it at the same time, which is something that every work of art (by definition) should attempt to accomplish.

The film delves into the rotted core of the “happy American family” and the real superficial elements that have fallen into everyday life. Carolyn isn’t happy, Lester isn’t happy, Jane isn’t happy and as Lester says in his first opening monologue, he would tell Jane that she will grow up to be happy, but he doesn’t want to lie to her.

I mention the sheer beauty behind the name in my column about movie titles (exciting, I know) but that isn’t the final brilliant thing in the film. Albeit, some of the lines are blase and uninspired, but the midpoint monologue explains that away while featuring a video of a plastic bag blowing in the wind so the film appears to be a commentary of itself, which in itself is a commentary of real life. No wonder it was such a big deal when I was a kid.

#1 In Bruges
When I first saw In Bruges I thought it was okay. Two hitmen, one has to kill the other, blah blah blah, funny midget part, blah blah blah, bang bang, end.  I knew from the beginning that the writing was sharp, witty and layered, but I had no idea exactly how layered it was until I realized what was dwelling underneath the surface of this film.

Now,  I mentioned earlier that I’ve seen Pirate Radio something like 28 times. If that’s true, then I’ve probably seen In Bruges about 27 times. It’s my favorite film to put on when I want to really analyze something because there is so much to examine and it is still fresh, fun and hysterical during every viewing.

What is this mysterious second layer of the story? You will have to rent the film to find out for yourself, but let me give you a hint. This film doubles as a story of biblical proportions and they say many times throughout the film that they are “waiting” in Bruges for further instructions.

That’s all the information I plan on giving, but just know that the film was written and directed by the master of subtext, Martin McDonagh so it may take a few viewings before the brilliant layer settles itself upon you.

So that does it for my top ten! What are your favorite films? Let us know below!

Curious about what Pat’s favorite films are? Come back tomorrow for Pat’s top ten favorite movies and be sure to come back on Friday for Jeremy’s picks and our big announcement!

Doctor Who season 10 finally has an air date and not only that, so does the spin-off Class!

It’s time to celebrate because we finally know when we’ll see Peter Capaldi back in the T.A.R.D.I.S. as the Doctor! BBC America will premiere Doctor Who season 10 on Saturday, April 15 at 9/8c. Check out the brand new trailer promoting the series, narrated by the brand new companion, Bill:

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Doctor Who season 10 finally has an air date and not only that, so does the spin-off Class!

It’s time to celebrate because we finally know when we’ll see Peter Capaldi back in the T.A.R.D.I.S. as the Doctor! BBC America will premiere Doctor Who season 10 on Saturday, April 15 at 9/8c. Check out the brand new trailer promoting the series, narrated by the brand new companion, Bill:

No word on if the UK will be seeing the same air date but it’s more than likely they will since it’s been like that in years past.

This will be Peter Capaldi’s last season as the Doctor, along with Steven Moffat’s last season running the show. After this we’ll be seeing Chris Chibnall taking the reins with a clean slate, and we’re so curious about how the series will go. How will the Doctor regenerate? Will this be Bill’s first and last season on the show as well? Who’s going to be the next Doctor? We’ve got so many questions! But they’ll all be answered in due time… we hope.

And that’s not all! Fans in the UK have already had the chance to enjoy the brand new spin-off series, Class, and after Doctor Who premieres on April 15 Americans will finally witness it as well.

Set to air directly after Doctor Who at 10/9c, Class is helmed by award-winning YA writer and executive producer, Patrick Ness. The series follows a group of students at Coal Hill School as they deal aliens, invasions and awkward social dilemmas.

Having seen Class in its entirety we can tell you that it’s got the perfect Doctor Who vibe and should fit in perfectly after you watch the season 10 premiere. Although not everyone loved the premiere, the series as whole definitely grows on you. You’ll just have to check it out for yourself!

Are you excited for ‘Doctor Who’ season 10?

How to Get Away with Murder just dropped a bombshell as we found out the truth behind #WhoKilledWes. However, that reveal isn’t the only moment fans are buzzing about.

Obvious spoilers below.

1. Laurel’s emotional demand

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How to Get Away with Murder just dropped a bombshell as we found out the truth behind #WhoKilledWes. However, that reveal isn’t the only moment fans are buzzing about.

Obvious spoilers below.

1. Laurel’s emotional demand

After confessing to both Michaela why Connor was at the house the night Wes died one of the many shocking reveals of the episode is made. “Connor might have killed Wes.” As it turns out, Connor showed up at the Keating home after responding to Annalise’s plea for them to all meet there. As he arrived he found signs of a struggle, and even more, Wes’s warm body in the basement.

Connor could smell gas, but still he persisted in trying to resuscitate Wes through CPR. For over a minute he cried and pounded on the dying boy’s chest until he heard a crack of bone, a fractured rib. He fears he might have punctured a lung. He fears he might have been the one to strike the deadly blow.

Once the confession is made the Keating crew reacts. Oliver pleads for understanding. Annalise reassures Connor that he didn’t do this. Bonnie tries to play mediator, keeping everyone calm. Finally Laurel, in a blindingly emotional rage, instructs Connor to go and kill himself. Saying such action will be the only good thing he will ever do with his life.

2. Annalise’s hidden voicemail

Connor and Oliver were adamant that nothing on the copy of Annalise’s phone was incriminated. Then why would she ask Oliver to erase it? Well when Connor is about to be arrested for Wes’ murder fans find out just what Annalise was so afraid of. he discloses to Denver the location of the copy, and Annalise comes forward with what she wanted to hide.

The night that Wes died he left her a voicemail, explaining ADA Atwood’s plan to take her down for the murder of Sam and Rebecca Stutter. His exact words are “I can’t let you go down for what I did.” He begs her to come home, to talk about it, to discuss their options. But he died before any arrangements could be made. In fact, he was taken down moments after the call was made.

What is truly shocking however isn’t the voicemail itself. The kicker is how Annalise uses the voicemail to pin it all on a new suspect to clear her own name. Wes. Out of context, the voicemail sounds like Wes is confessing to killing both Sam and Rebecca. Annalise is able to twist the story to make it look like Wes took his own life out of guilt. She tarnishes his reputation forever.

3. Oliver’s shocking request

After Connor answers the burner phone Denver used to stay in contact with Atwood throughout Wes’ death, he goes missing. He is caught by Denver and taken to a hidden location where he is held against his will.  While held, he is questioned about his involvement with Wes’ death. He is accused of murdering Sam. He is threatened to be held for more than the legal 48 hours.

Meanwhile, Oliver heightens to a frenzy. In a panicked state he obsesses about the whereabouts of his boyfriend. He brings up the severity of the situation almost every time his face shows up on our screens. While most (Laurel) believe that Connor has taken Wes’ immunity deal, Oliver remains convinced that Connor is in immediate danger.

He isn’t wrong. Connor is nearly arrested for the murder of Wes. Luckily, after the voicemail comes to light he is released. When he arrives home the two boys engage in a moment of passion, literally ripping the clothes off of each other. They talk about safety, moving to California, making babies, and loving each other forever. To Connor it’s all tied to the sex. To Oliver, however, it’s much more. He’s serious. He asks Connor to marry him.

4. Michaela’s oddly-timed confession

In the heat of everything going on Asher declares his love for Michaela. He calls this year the most awful of his life. He can’t let another moment go by without telling Michaela how he feels. As he spends a few tender moments showing Michaela his heart she pretends to hear Laurel from the other room. She effectively flees the situation.

Michaela doesn’t feel she can honestly answer that question. She doesn’t know. In fact, she doesn’t know if she has ever been in love. However, when it comes down to it, as Michaela has to pretend she wants to go home with Charles Mahoney she realizes something. She does love Asher. Or at least she thinks she does. That’s right, the girl who has always held her true intentions hidden deep inside finally opens up in a women’s public restroom, no less.

5. Wes’ murderer revealed

As the final episode of season 3 came to a close we felt pretty sure that the mysterious hitman was in cahoots with Denver. He never denied it, he almost seemed to confess as Annalise threatened to take him down. As she accused him of having a hand in Wes’ death in some way he seemed so guilty. It had to be him. The very last moments of the episode revealed a very different story, however.

As Laurel began to run down Charles Mahoney who awaited Michaela at a cab she ran into a similar face. Although, she and the audience had much different reasons for recognizing him. To her this man was Dominique, a family friend. To the audience he was the hitman who injected Wes with the lethal substance that took his life.

In one final flashback we see Connor running past the hitman’s car as he talks on the phone. He confirms that the deed is done. Wes is dead. But he doesn’t relay this news to Denver. He is speaking with Laurel’s father. The orchestrator of this all.

What moment stood out to you most in the ‘How to Get Away with Murder’ season 3 finale?

I’ve noticed that a lot of television shows lately have focused on some form of mental health issues, and it’s making TV a whole lot better.

If you’ve watched a decent amount of TV lately you probably noticed this trend, and if you haven’t then you’re about to read about it. The more I watch TV the more I notice that a lot of shows have, in some way, brought up how people handle mental health issues like depression or anxiety. Either they have a character who faces it on a weekly or semi-weekly basis or an episode dedicated to someone handling it and I think it’s about damn time.

For the longest time Hollywood treated mental health disorders as some scary, horrible thing. It was all about straight-jackets and asylums and people never really understood how varied mental health disorders could be. Mental health problems are more than just schizophrenia and psychotic disorders, and finally I feel like Hollywood is beginning to go past the tip of that iceberg.

Read full article

I’ve noticed that a lot of television shows lately have focused on some form of mental health issues, and it’s making TV a whole lot better.

If you’ve watched a decent amount of TV lately you probably noticed this trend, and if you haven’t then you’re about to read about it. The more I watch TV the more I notice that a lot of shows have, in some way, brought up how people handle mental health issues like depression or anxiety. Either they have a character who faces it on a weekly or semi-weekly basis or an episode dedicated to someone handling it and I think it’s about damn time.

For the longest time Hollywood treated mental health disorders as some scary, horrible thing. It was all about straight-jackets and asylums and people never really understood how varied mental health disorders could be. Mental health problems are more than just schizophrenia and psychotic disorders, and finally I feel like Hollywood is beginning to go past the tip of that iceberg.

But that’s just it, we’ve only begun to explore mental health awareness in the proper way. With all of the shows on TV only a small number of them have started to explore this important subject. But the few that have? They’ve done a great job.

As much as I love TV I don’t watch everything so I’ve asked my Hypable co-workers to share with me their shows and how any of them highlight mental health awareness. These are all such great examples of how a television show can bring up awareness not for the sake of entertainment but rather because it’s important to show the world how mental health actually affects our lives.

‘The 100’


Jasper Jordan is a rare character in a post-apocalyptic work of fiction, because unlike most of his delinquent peers, he doesn’t have a near-superhuman ability to compartmentalise the traumas and keep fighting for his own and his friends’ survival.

Related: Jasper’s arc on The 100 is real, raw, and underrated

Where characters like Clarke, Bellamy, Monty and even Murphy get knocked down and get right back up again, Jasper isn’t able to do that. The ground was already well on its way to breaking him before he experienced the horrors of Mount Weather, and despite surviving it all, he hasn’t emerged stronger — his mind is giving out, and Jasper has no desire left to carry on. His self-destructive depression and suicidal tendencies were on full display in the season 3 finale, and although the writers decided to let him live (the original plan was for him to kill himself), his trauma hasn’t magically disappeared.

Jasper is a broken soul in an unforgiving world, and his pain is going to continue to define his character from here on out. –Selina Wilken

‘Bojack Horseman’


Every character on Bojack Horseman suffers from depression, and they all deal with it in different ways. Bojack is cruel and listless and blames everyone else for his problems, Mr.Peanutbutter hides his pain behind a smile and an upbeat personality.

Princess Carolyn loses herself in work and keeps her distance from other people emotionally to avoid being hurt again. Todd allows others to steer his life for him because he believes he’s too dumb and useless to make his own decisions. Every season hammers home why these characters behave the way that they behave, and it’s all wrapped up in a big metaphor about how we’re all just animals trying to survive. –Jimmy Bean

‘UnReal’


Probably one of the most evident and obvious shows that handle mental health, UnReal‘s main protagonist Rachel suffers from a lot of anxiety, depression and post traumatic stress disorder. If you watch just season one and half of season 2 you may not understand Rachel’s actions or why she suffers from PTSD, but in season 2, episode 7 it all becomes clear. Unlike the other shows, UnReal provides a great example for how to not handle depression. The actions of the characters are so abundantly harmful and deceitful that it’s easy to hate the characters and what they’re doing.

It’s hard to discuss without spoilers, but it’s not hard to see how Rachel suffers from these mental health conditions. The poor woman is surrounded by people who try to help her by helping themselves, leaving her to handle her depression and anxiety alone, and it provides a clear picture for how to not support your friends. The best thing this show does is displaying how important it is to take a look at the people around you and make sure you’re keeping them there for the right reasons.

As morally corrupt as the show and its characters are it’s a realistic portrayal of how harmful denying and not treating your depression and anxiety can be. –Tariq Kyle

‘Teen Wolf’


Stiles anxiety has been threaded subtly through Teen Wolf, with just a few instances where it has made it to the forefront of the plot. In one case, Stiles has a panic attack when he’s learned his father has been taken in season 3. Since he lost his mother has a young child, his father is really the only family he has left. Stiles has always been overprotective of his dad — making sure he’s eating healthy and taking care of himself. When he has a panic attack, Lydia finds a way to calm him down, but she doesn’t try to cure him.

Stiles’ anxiety is as much a part of history as anything else, and it returns to enhance the plot of the show in season 5 when Stiles is worried about what will happen to his friendship with Scott after high school. It drives Stiles to attempt to keep everyone together, but when that all falls apart, he must confront his fears and accept that life doesn’t always work out the way you want it to. By the time season 6A finishes up, Stiles has overcome this particular trigger, but again, that does not mean he’s been cured of his anxiety. Teen Wolf knows that a mental illness like anxiety is not something you just get over; it’s something you constantly have to work through. –Karen Rought

‘The Magicians’

‘The Magicians’

The biggest driving force in The Magicians actually isn’t magic, but rather depression. It’s made all too clear in season 1 when Elliot explains to Quentin, “magic doesn’t come from talent, it comes from pain.” Author Lev Grossman has discussed this parallel several times, explaining that his own depression was the inspiration for the series.

Grossman explains, “when I was really struggling with depression, I would lie in bed every day, and I couldn’t get up. And I would watch people doing these normal things, going to their jobs and having their relationships, and I would think, I could never do that. And it felt like they were doing magic. And when I started to get better, and I started getting up, and I started doing all these normal things, I felt like I was a magician.”

And what’s particularly great about The Magicians is how each character handles their own depression and anxiety in their own way. Some, like Quentin, are sheepish and quiet about it. Others, like Elliot or Margo, put up a facade of strength and nonchalant-ness that they seldom put down for others. The show is incredibly unique in how it handles mental health, and it’s a great representation of how today’s adults are dealing with it in their own way. –Tariq Kyle

‘Survivor’


While scripted shows are improving leaps and bounds in their portrayals of mental illness, Survivor has always been happy to show real people overcoming real obstacles, including anxiety disorders and phobias that do not lend themselves to being marooned on an island for a month or more. This past season on Survivor brought us three very different, but inspiring storylines about people overcoming anxiety and such to do extremely well in a game that has overwhelmed some of its strongest participants.

David, who works as a TV writer when he’s not marooning himself on television, walked into the game looking like the type of person that is usually the first person voted off. He appeared weak, paranoid, and was afraid of nearly everything on the island (a scene in which he is scared to hold a stick bug stands out in my brain). As he grew comfortable with his surroundings, he managed to harness his weaknesses and use them in his own favor. He also bonded with another of our inspiring survivors, Ken.

Ken suffered from a stutter as a kid, and has social anxiety thanks to years of bullying and teasing. Ken not only learned to bond with David, but throughout the game managed to make friends and trusted allies despite his anxiety.

Last, but certainly never least is Hannah. Hannah, like David, walked onto the island looking like the type of person that gets voted off this show in the first few episodes. Her lowest point was definitely when she had an anxiety attack from just watching an immunity challenge in progress. She was sitting on the sidelines and suddenly started hyperventilating and her hands seized up. She went on to form solid alliances and maneuver her way into the final three.

Survivor allowed viewers to watch as these three unlikely people made their way through one of the toughest social experiments in play today. Their struggles are real and tough, and they’ve put themselves in circumstances most of us couldn’t dream of subjecting ourselves to, but each came out stronger, more assured in who they are, and aware that their anxiety does not define them. –Kristen Kranz

How do you feel depression and anxiety are being represented on TV?

Don’t forget, you’re not alone. Give a call to the National Suicide Hotline (1-800-273-8255) or text them by texting START to 741-741