So here’s the deal. We at Hypable have something very exciting that we want to announce in the next few days and we wanted to kick it off with a bit of fun. When three key members of the Hypable team sat down to talk through this exciting new development, all that we found ourselves talking about were our favorite movies.

So here we go, over the next three days, Myself, Jeremy Baril and Pat McCoy will take a few hours to tell you about our favorite films in the days leading to the announcement! Come join the fun!

So before we get into the nitty gritty of the movies that I would happily watch on my birthday, lets breeze through the honorable mentions because numbers are cruel and I can only include ten movies on a top ten list for some reason.

Honorable Mentions: Star Wars, Moulin Rouge, Reservoir Dogs, Pulp Fiction, Godfather Part II, Love Actually, Children of Men, Shaun of the Dead, Monty Python and the Holy Grail, Psycho, The Social Network, Jurassic Park, Gone With The Wind, Singin’ In The Rain, Billy Elliot

So there they are. I felt guilty playing favorites (I fear that some of those honorable mentions might think that I don’t love them!) but the following ten films are, without a doubt, my ten favorite films of all time. This week.

#10 O, Brother Where Art Thou?

This is a movie that I watched as soon as I found out that it existed a full five years after its release. I share my taste in movies with my grandmother, and when she recommended O Brother Where Art Thou to me, I admit that I dragged my shoes a little bit. It looked a little old timey and boring so it just didn’t catch my fancy. I couldn’t have been more wrong.

I finally caught it on an airplane a few years ago and disturbed everyone within a five row radius with my laughter. It’s brilliance mixed with illiteracy. The sheer contrast is enough to make anyone chuckle.

You can never go wrong with the Coen brothers, and O Brother Where Art Thou proves that point.  These guys can apparently take Homer’s The Odyssey and set it in the South during the Great Depression (and have it be comedy nonetheless)  and still make it a masterpiece. Sorry, did I just blow your mind? O Brother Where Art Thou is based off of The Odyssey all the way down to the Cyclops (remember the eye-patched John Goodman?) They even have Homer listed as a writer of the film, which is just adorable.

#9 The Big Lebowski

This is another one that I caught several years after everyone else already found out that it was cool. I guess that makes me a reverse hipster in a way. Anyway, I was the biggest loser in college for being the only one who hadn’t seen The Big Lebowski and when I finally sat down to watch it, I only got twenty minutes in. I just didn’t get it. When I finally watched it all the way through my first time, I thought it was okay, but I frankly couldn’t wait until it was over.

That’s when I developed my (non)famous The Big Lebowski theory that clearly states that you’ll find out exactly how good a comedy is once you have watched it three times. After my third time watching Lebowski, I finally got it. I don’t know what it was exactly that I got, but this film can’t go three lines without cracking me up now and it comes straight from the Coen’s tight and stylized writing style.

This film exploits every rule of comedy in the book and still closely follows traditional film noir traditions, making it (literally) a black comedy. There is something to be said about making a contemporary detective film that centers on the location of a rug. It’s a whole lot of something about nothing, and at the end of the day that spells comedy.

#8 Rear Window

Before you start thinking that this is just a Coen brothers party that no one else was invited to, let me throw in a wild card. Unless I’m wildly underestimating the cinematic literacy of our audience, many of you have not seen this film. This is not a bad thing. I’m not even mad, you just need to go out and rent it right now.

Rear Window is a claustrophobic examination of humans, humanity, and the insane Earth that we were all planted on. Largely regarded as one Hitchcock’s best, it broke pre-established conventions by taking place entirely inside the apartment of the protagonist. He watches the actions of his neighbors through the gigantic bay windows in the rear of his apartment because as his nurse tells him “we’ve become a race of peeping Toms.”

From nose to tail, this thing is packed with heavy lines carrying more than just their surface meaning. Hitchcock is famous for doing this, but this is one of those films that appears to be teaching you about humanity on top of presenting a genuinely thrilling tale about a man who appears to have murdered his wife.

#7 The Godfather

I know what you’re thinking. “Number seven? How can you put the masterpiece of masterpieces as number seven?!” Now, it would seem that no list of the best films of all time would be complete without the tale of the Corleones and maybe it was out of my attraction to non-conformity that I slid it down to number seven. I certainly consider it to be the greatest film of all time (as many do), but as a list of my personal favorites, there are some that take personal preference.

Still though, the film is a shining masterpiece and anyone who doesn’t like it simply has bad taste. I don’t like making enemies, but if you watched the whole thing all the way through and understood the story that it was telling and still didn’t like it then I don’t know what to say. “Rent Paul Blart: Mall Cop and cry yourself to sleep again, I guess” would probably be my advice to this person.

The Godfather is a timeless classic about family, crime, power, trust and betrayal. Every turn of the story, every look, every thought and every camera angle is orchestrated perfectly to beautifully tell a sweeping story of inheritance and family duty. The addition of Godfather II only deepened the story and filled it with a past rich enough to merit its predecessor and a future that would make Vito Corleone weep. The cast is filled with stars and the storytelling is immaculate. Go and buy this film. Don’t just rent it. Buy it at Target right now. I hear they have an deal on DVDs that’s pretty hard to refuse.

#6 Pirate Radio

I didn’t see Pirate Radio (or alternatively, The Boat That Rocked) until it finally came to the United States and I don’t see how Richard Curtis, the film’s writer and director hasn’t been heralded as one of the best filmmakers of the decade. Every film I’ve seen by him has been so lovingly crafted and so chock-full of fascinatingly unique characters that I don’t really understand why he isn’t currently swimming in work.

Pirate Radio is the perfect film to put on when you’re standing over your stack of DVDs stumped by what to put on. The plot isn’t too ridiculously complex, it instead chooses to focus on the characters and what rock and roll means to them. The soundtrack is electrifying and the dialogue is unbelievably funny. It is played for laughs from beginning to end, but like any Curtis feature there are small moments of biting reality that remind you that life (like the boat that everyone lives on) rocks frequently, and sinks on occasion.

Out of all the films on this list, I’ve seen Pirate Radio the most (probably at least 28 times) and it has not yet overstayed its welcome. I literally watched it three days ago while I cleaned my room and I still sang along to every song.

#5 Inglourious Basterds

As the final words of the film imply, Inglourious Basterds is Quentin Tarantino’s masterpiece.  I have a funny love/hate relationship with Tarantino. There is nothing about Kill Bill that I enjoy, yet Pulp Fiction is one of my favorites. Death Proof is pretty much an abomination, yet Reservoir Dogs was one of the best heist movies of its decade and it didn’t even feature a heist.

With Inglourious Basterds, Tarantino explored new ground with his first real period piece and he broke even further ground by actually casting people that fit their nationality. “Tom Cruise as a German? Just slap an eye patch on him and send him to makeup!” This logic doesn’t fly with Tarantino and he was very successful at getting genuine foreign celebrities to star in his film about internationality.

I own the script for Inglourious Basterds, and even though the movie is already one of my favorites, I’ve read the screenplay in its raw form three times. It’s just spectacularly written, superbly crafted, masterfully cast, has one of the best villains of all time and features brutal (sometimes horrific) Nazi killing. What else can a guy ask for?

#4 El Laberinto del Fauno

I know, I know, I know. I pick one foreign film and it’s the obvious one? Now don’t get me wrong, I’m not calling it by its original name to seem like an arrogant cinemaphile that eats caviar and swims in a pool filled with gold turnips. I kid you not, in video rental stores across the nation there is a red faced customer demanding to see someone’s manager for not giving them the “American” version of El Laberinto Del Fauno.

It’s in Spanish. It was meant to be in Spanish. It’s beautiful in Spanish. El Laberinto Del Fauno translates to “The Labyrinth of the faun”, not “Pan’s Labyrinth.” I get it, Pan (from Greek legend) is a faun, and there is definitely an awesome badass faun in the movie, but calling it Pan’s Labyrinth is like calling The Man Who Knew Too Much something like Jerry Knows Too Much. There’s no Jerry in the movie, so how does calling it Jerry Knows Too Much make any kind of sense?

The story is expansive and rich, the idea of mixing fantasy with history is infinitely thrilling and exploring the mind and imagination of a young girl as she deals with her new and extraordinary circumstance is both enchanting and tragic. The film flourished before our very eyes and captured the imagination of everyone who saw it, including the children that witnessed a bottle murder when they were unwittingly brought by their parents.

#3 Big Fish

Here’s the thing about my love for Big Fish. I watched the whole thing on television one day out of the blue. When it finally finished, I broke down crying. It was the most fantastic tale that had ever been spun before me, and since the entire film is about storytelling and what it can do for the sake of humanity it just was too much for my emotional purse to handle.

Each of the stories told are even more miraculous than the last, and the design of the film impeccably places us in the world that the film wants to tell us about. Big Fish is one of Tim Burton’s only films that isn’t all Tim Burton’ed out and the movie is his best because of that. It was a soaring tale of humanity and the final twenty minutes are some of the most touching minutes I have ever experienced while watching a movie.

Every time I watch this film now, I can’t help but cry. There’s an exact moment in an exact scene that gets me every time, and it’s when everyone shouts “he’s here!’ when Billy Crudup carries Albert Finney into the clearing by the lake. I’m tearing up now just thinking about it. Way to go, Big Fish, leave me alone already.

#2 American Beauty

Now this film, in my opinion, is the single greatest achievement in American film, and only because of how sharply and accurately it is able to reflect reality and harshly criticize it at the same time, which is something that every work of art (by definition) should attempt to accomplish.

The film delves into the rotted core of the “happy American family” and the real superficial elements that have fallen into everyday life. Carolyn isn’t happy, Lester isn’t happy, Jane isn’t happy and as Lester says in his first opening monologue, he would tell Jane that she will grow up to be happy, but he doesn’t want to lie to her.

I mention the sheer beauty behind the name in my column about movie titles (exciting, I know) but that isn’t the final brilliant thing in the film. Albeit, some of the lines are blase and uninspired, but the midpoint monologue explains that away while featuring a video of a plastic bag blowing in the wind so the film appears to be a commentary of itself, which in itself is a commentary of real life. No wonder it was such a big deal when I was a kid.

#1 In Bruges
When I first saw In Bruges I thought it was okay. Two hitmen, one has to kill the other, blah blah blah, funny midget part, blah blah blah, bang bang, end.  I knew from the beginning that the writing was sharp, witty and layered, but I had no idea exactly how layered it was until I realized what was dwelling underneath the surface of this film.

Now,  I mentioned earlier that I’ve seen Pirate Radio something like 28 times. If that’s true, then I’ve probably seen In Bruges about 27 times. It’s my favorite film to put on when I want to really analyze something because there is so much to examine and it is still fresh, fun and hysterical during every viewing.

What is this mysterious second layer of the story? You will have to rent the film to find out for yourself, but let me give you a hint. This film doubles as a story of biblical proportions and they say many times throughout the film that they are “waiting” in Bruges for further instructions.

That’s all the information I plan on giving, but just know that the film was written and directed by the master of subtext, Martin McDonagh so it may take a few viewings before the brilliant layer settles itself upon you.

So that does it for my top ten! What are your favorite films? Let us know below!

Curious about what Pat’s favorite films are? Come back tomorrow for Pat’s top ten favorite movies and be sure to come back on Friday for Jeremy’s picks and our big announcement!

Disney is making another live-action movie, and this time it’s James and the Giant Peach, to be developed by Director Sam Mendes.

To refresh your memory, James and the Giant Peach is the terrifying delightful children’s movie directed by Henry Selick and based off of the Roald Dahl story. It features nightmare-inducing adorable stop-motion animated bugs that helped James float away from his mean aunts in a — you guessed it — giant peach.

The original film was an interesting mix of live-action characters in the beginning and at the end, with stop-motion animated sequences throughout the middle.

Read full article

Disney is making another live-action movie, and this time it’s James and the Giant Peach, to be developed by Director Sam Mendes.

To refresh your memory, James and the Giant Peach is the terrifying delightful children’s movie directed by Henry Selick and based off of the Roald Dahl story. It features nightmare-inducing adorable stop-motion animated bugs that helped James float away from his mean aunts in a — you guessed it — giant peach.

The original film was an interesting mix of live-action characters in the beginning and at the end, with stop-motion animated sequences throughout the middle.

Now, according to Deadline, Disney is developing an all-live-action remake of the film. Nick Hornby will write the script, while Joe Roth is in negotiations to sign on as a producer.

If Mendes’ name sounds familiar, it’s because he directed the last two James Bond features, both Skyfall and Spectre, as well as 1999’s American Beauty.

You can check out the trailer for the horrifying original film below:

As of late, Disney has been announcing live-action versions of its properties left and right, including The Nutcracker (which has a huge cast of well-known actors), The Little Mermaid (with Lin-Manuel Miranda attached to help write the music), Beauty and the Beast (starring Emma Watson), and Cruella (starring Emma Stone), among others.

With the amount of remakes — especially in the live-action department — it’s no wonder James and the giant Peach is the latest to be announced.

Do you want to see a live-action ‘James and the Giant Peach’ movie?

Legion M president Jeff Annison introduces the first fan-owned entertainment company

"Opening the gates to Hollywood" with fandom-powered entertainment production.

2:12 pm EDT, August 24, 2016

Hypable speaks to co-founder Jeff Annison about Legion M’s goals, fan engagement, and potential impact on the entertainment industry.

An exciting new project launched over the summer: Legion M, the world’s first fan-owned entertainment company.

At San Diego Comic-Con, Hype Podcast sat down with co-founder and company president Jeff Annison, in order to learn more about the ambitious startup that promises to give fans more creative control of entertainment production.

Read full article

Hypable speaks to co-founder Jeff Annison about Legion M’s goals, fan engagement, and potential impact on the entertainment industry.

An exciting new project launched over the summer: Legion M, the world’s first fan-owned entertainment company.

At San Diego Comic-Con, Hype Podcast sat down with co-founder and company president Jeff Annison, in order to learn more about the ambitious startup that promises to give fans more creative control of entertainment production.

The full interview is available to download here or via iTunes, or you can stream it below:

In the interview, Annison explains the mission of Legion M, which is to bring fans directly into the production process. Says Annison, “For the first time in history, we are architected to be built from the ground up to be owned by fans.”

With a ‘Legion’ of fan investors behind them, Annison believes that Legion M’s approach to selecting and developing projects will be very different from anything else we’ve seen in Hollywood.

Where usually creators will struggle to make their content stand out from the crowd, “bringing the audience into the process [of creating entertainment], we’ve already got a built-in audience,” Annison explains. “If you can have the audience of content be invested in content, it gives that content a competitive advantage.”

One of the key ways in which Legion M hopes to influence the creative industry is by opening the door for more diverse projects.

As Hollywood is so revenue-driven, oftentimes the ‘risk’ of letting a movie’s lead character be a woman, a person of color and/or a member of the LGBT community is simply considered too great. But Legion M, being owned by fans, has the opportunity to tip the scales. Because if the investors want more diversity and new kinds of stories, that’s exactly what they’re going to get.

“The reason that there are so many superhero movies and reboots and remakes… Hollywood’s figured out the formula. You pick something with an established fanbase, and if you make the movie you know it’s less risky because you know those people are gonna come see the next Superman movie,” says Annison. “Whereas if it’s an unknown story, you just don’t know. So we believe when you make the audience part of the process, these fans that are part of our studio … if you’ve got an audience that’s baked into it, that gives you so much more creative leeway.”

In practice, this means that Legion M, “could come up with a completely new and novel story that’s never been tried before, and know that it’s gonna have some success” — which means that it’d actually get produced, unlike many original ideas that come to Hollywood to die.

Further, fan owners of Legion M can experience unprecedented involvement with the creative process. Not only are they involved with selecting and developing projects, but, “our promise to our investors is that we’re gonna take you along for the ride. When we film a movie, we wanna live-stream from the set. When we have project opportunities, we wanna put them in front of you. We give the Legion a voice.”

To start with, Legion M is partnering with Seth Green and Matthew Senreich’s Stoopid Buddy Stoodios, which created Robot Chicken. Annison explains that they still have “dozens” of projects that networks have rejected, and Legion M is working on bringing some of them to life.

In terms of representation, Legion M doesn’t necessarily want to commit to a quota of diversity. Instead, where they expect to be able to influence Hollywood is at the “table” where these decisions are made — and, “because we’re owned by such a broad, diverse group of people, we’ve got a better shot than anybody else at being able to affect that change.”

As Annison explains: “Fans have the ultimate power. Our money is what makes this whole thing spin around. When we combine and come together, we’ve got all the power.”

Read more about Legion M and how to get involved on their website.

As we approach the Captain America: Civil War Blu-Ray release date, a new deleted scene from the film has been released.

And it’s a Civil War deleted scene that is sure to please Stucky fans.

In the clip, Bucky quickly comes to the defense of bae (a.k.a. Cap) when War Machine briefly takes him down. Bucky gets back at Rhodey by throwing Cap’s iconic shield at him, and as the shield boomerangs back, Steve Rogers catches it. Take THAT, War Machine! #TeamCap

Read full article

As we approach the Captain America: Civil War Blu-Ray release date, a new deleted scene from the film has been released.

And it’s a Civil War deleted scene that is sure to please Stucky fans.

In the clip, Bucky quickly comes to the defense of bae (a.k.a. Cap) when War Machine briefly takes him down. Bucky gets back at Rhodey by throwing Cap’s iconic shield at him, and as the shield boomerangs back, Steve Rogers catches it. Take THAT, War Machine! #TeamCap

Watch below:

The movie’s airport scene was easily one of the most delightful moments of the film, so we’re loving this extra dose of Stucky brilliance.

Need more? The Captain America Blu-ray, with a release date set for September 13, includes the following special features:

  1. United We Stand, Divided We Fall – The Making of Captain America: Civil War Part 1 & Part 2 – As the tension mounts, sides are chosen and lines drawn. Learn more about the characters on each side—from Captain America and Iron Man to the latest recruits. In this complete behind-the-scenes look at a landmark in the Marvel saga, we’ll examine their stories through exclusive footage and interviews and discover just what went into selecting the Super Hero teams, filming the epic action sequences and introducing Black Panther and Spider-Man to the MCU.
  2. Captain America: The Road to Civil War – Explore the First Avenger’s fascinating evolution from loyal soldier to seasoned, conflicted hero who questions authority.
  3. Iron Man: The Road to Civil War – From Gulmira to Sokovia, delve into the development and evolution of one of the most iconic characters in the Marvel Cinematic Universe.
  4. Gag Reel – Break the tension of this high-stakes conflict with some hilarious outtakes featuring the lighter side of your favorite Super Heroes.
  5. Deleted & Extended Scenes – Check out never-before-seen footage that didn’t make the final cut of Captain America: Civil War.
  6. Audio Commentary – Directors Anthony and Joe Russo and screenwriters Christopher Markus and Stephen McFeely deliver scene-by-scene insight and explain the storytelling challenges they faced creating the third installment of the Captain America franchise.
  7. Open Your Mind: Marvel’s Doctor Strange – Exclusive Sneak Peek – Go behind and beyond the scenes as Doctor Strange makes his journey to the big screen.

The Digital HD version of Civil War will be released on September 2.