‘Glee’ recap: 4×13 ‘Diva’

8:15 pm EST, February 8, 2013

This week on Glee, everyone’s a diva. Finn and Emma lead New Directions through “diva week,” with the goal of instilling a fierce, competitive spirit in the club.

Tina uses the challenge to go after the impossible, and she’s not taking no for an answer, and Santana returns to McKinley to teach the newbies what true star power looks like. Meanwhile, in New York, Rachel’s rising star has been feeding her ego in a bad way, and Kurt takes her down a peg. You can read our full recap below.

We drop straight in, this week, to Kurt’s inner monologue as he explains to us Rachel’s growing primadonna behaviour as she begins to make a name for herself at NYADA. We see her selfish behaviour in their home, her limelight-hogging in classes, and perhaps most distressingly, the way she is ignoring Kurt on campus and surrounding herself with sycophantic fair-weather friends who follow her around, feeding her ego. Kurt, looking on critically, decides that Miss Rachel Berry needs to be brought back down to earth, quick-sharpish – and that he’s the man for the job.

In the teacher’s lounge at McKinley, it appears that Emma has come to regard Finn as a friend and equal as she vocalises anxiety about making all the choices by herself in regards to her upcoming wedding with Will. We learn that Will is returning from Washington at the end of the week, and as Finn makes a coffee and sits with Emma, he enquires whether the couple will be going on honeymoon – he’s wondering how much longer he will have the glee club for. Emma says that she’s sure Will won’t just turn Finn out, especially as he successfully coached an inexperienced team through to Regionals. This leads Finn to express his concerns about Regionals and his club’s lack of serious competitive drive – the lack of powerhouse voices like Rachel, Mercedes, Kurt and Santana, and more importantly the lack of attitude. Emma suggests spurring the New Directions on by pitting them against each other, reminding Finn that Will had previously made members of the club compete. Finn is delighted by the idea, and invites Emma to be the guest judge of the week’s activities.

Finn brings Emma to glee rehearsal where the pair introduce “diva” as the week’s lesson theme. “The Online Urban Dictionary defines a diva as a fierce, often temperamental singer who comes correct. She is not a trick-ass ho and she does not sweat the haters,” Emma reads from cue cards, going on to explain how she herself has channelled her inner diva as a demanding restaurant customer. Members of the glee club start to bicker behind the teachers’ backs, sassing each other about who is going to win the top spot. Unique, of course, starts marking her territory as New Directions’ prime diva, and Tina challenges this, saying something fantastically transphobic along the way. Marley puts Tina in her place, Blaine tries to interrupt the girls to state that guys can be divas as well, and Brittany claims that they’re all delusional, as she’s going to be winning. Do you know how she knows that? It’s because she’s a-a diva, she’s a, she’s a-a diva.

The girls of New Directions – Brittany, Tina, Marley, Kitty and Unique, as well as Blaine, face off with one another in a fantasy version of Beyonce’s “Diva,” all glammed-up catwalks and extreme rock star formal-wear. The outfits are awesome – especially Blaine’s giant red boa, vinyl corseted jacket and curls, and Marley’s one-sleeved pants-less purple unitard – and the group of wannabe divas return to their seats from their surreal performance just in time for Emma to finish her story: “and that is how I made the manager cry at the Cheesecake Factory – by being a diva.”

It seems that Rachel’s vocal warm-ups have woken Kurt an hour before his alarm, but as soon as she sees him awake she asks him to make her some special tea. He snarks at her, and Rachel demands an explanation for his “very rude no.” Kurt lays some truth on her – that since winning the Winter Showcase, she’s becoming hard to deal with. Rachel immediately accuses Kurt of jealousy at her success, despite the fact that they were becoming inseparable. Kurt rolls his eyes and tells her that they became close because Rachel had become tolerable, but now, with her “weird, naked boyfriend” and all her weird hangers-on, that she has become like “an annoying, self-righteous Lima Rachel on steroids.” He’s not wrong.

Rachel ignores his insult and bitches back at him, telling him that the only reason Carmen had let Kurt audition at the Winter Showcase was because he was Rachel’s friend (probably not true, hey) and Kurt scoffs derisively, saying that even though she won the Showcase, that his performance was the one everyone was talking about – that he’d blown her performance out of the water. Rachel goes stone-faced at this, and Kurt continues, saying that he could out-perform her again, and challenges her to something called “Midnight Madness.” Rachel, full of condescension, tells Kurt that he shouldn’t bother, and Kurt, matching her fake sweetness note-for-note, asks why. Rachel reminds him that she already beat him once, in a diva-off. Season 1, “Defying Gravity,” remember? Kurt smiles all through her spiel, and then drops some knowledge that apparently he’s never revealed to Rachel before – that he’d purposely thrown that competition. Rachel is nearly speechless, not believing him, but when he elaborates on why he’d done it, she realises that he is telling the truth and is completely horrified, wailing that it was her first big win, something she’d based her confidence on. Kurt’s unsympathetic, sighing with pretend pity and telling her to get ready for “Diva-Off: Part Two.”

Back at McKinley, Blaine’s coming down with a bit of a cold, and Tina has noticed, because Tina is a stalker. Tina quickly provides him with a care package, obviously doing anything she can at the moment to get noticed and needed by the object of her affections. Blaine accepts the offering, but says he probably won’t use the night-time cold medication, as it affects him quite badly in the drowsiness department and he can’t afford that right now, due to needing to focus on diva week. Interestingly, his drive does not seem to be based in his own competitiveness, but more in standing up for open-mindedness and the idea that men can be divas too.

He decides to show the rest of the guys how to bring some diva attitude by channelling the late, great Freddie Mercury, and we cut to the choir room, where he begins his performance of “Don’t Stop Me Now” in full Freddie get-up, including the hat (but thankfully sans the mustache). It is about time the show made more use of Darren Criss’ skills as a musician – remember how Cory Monteith used to drum all the time, and Mark Salling played guitar? – and he opens the song playing piano himself, kicking the piano stool out to stand and rock out when the song hits its full speed. It is an absolutely awesome performance – Blaine Anderson was made to sing this song, and the way that the club joins in on the backing vocals feels like a natural singalong, and it is just damn cool. Everyone – teachers, students, Blaine, and most importantly, me – is delighted with this rendition of a legendary song.

The next day, Finn and Emma discuss the concept of the intangible, immortal quality of a diva – the way they walk, talk and breathe brilliance – and they introduce a special guest diva to demonstrate this: Santana Lopez. She flounces into the choir room with a few of her Louisville Cardinals cheer squad team mates and blows the room away with a fantastic performance of “Nutbush City Limits.” Rather confusingly, the impressive choreography does not include even one repetition of the Nutbush’s traditional, well-known dance routine, so it’s kind of like singing the Macarena without doing the Macarena… but it still sounds and looks amazing, though Glee has clearly been missing its old, frequent opportunities to include many specaiily framed shots of shaking cheerleader butts. The show makes up for it here, don’t you worry.

Brittany looks confused and a bit distressed from the moment Santana walks in, but she gets up to high-five her ex-girlfriend at the end of the song. She compliments the performance but asks why Santana hadn’t told Brittany she was coming to town, and Santana poses what she deems to be the more important question – why hasn’t Brittany told her that she is dating Sam? Brittany continues to look uncomfortable as Santana explains the way she’d found out – we see a flashback of Tina rather bitchily calling her to tell her – and Santana then defiantly introduces one of her fellow college cheerleaders, Elaine, as her “out-and-proud, lipstick-loving, AfterEllen-reading” girlfriend. Glee, I’m not 100% sure that name-dropping AfterEllen is going to make it up to the “lesbian blogger community” you managed to insult in this whole Bram debacle, but gold star, you tried.

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At a time when the divide between the generations has arguably never been greater, The 100 encapsulates the struggle of millennials more than any other current show.

This article was submitted by Hypable reader Stephanie Farnsworth.

The media churns out article after article about the laziness of millennials, and then complains about how we work too hard. Millennials are branded “snowflakes” even as we struggle to pay rent and bear the consequences of the economic fall-out that we didn’t cause.

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At a time when the divide between the generations has arguably never been greater, The 100 encapsulates the struggle of millennials more than any other current show.

This article was submitted by Hypable reader Stephanie Farnsworth.

The media churns out article after article about the laziness of millennials, and then complains about how we work too hard. Millennials are branded “snowflakes” even as we struggle to pay rent and bear the consequences of the economic fall-out that we didn’t cause.

The CW drama The 100, which is entering its fourth season in February, rather bluntly captures that sense of young people paying the price of previous generations; at the beginning of the series, a council of adult politicians literally sent teenagers to a radiation-soaked earth to try to save their own society.

The 100 season 1 Jaha

The pilot episode revealed the extent of the power imbalance between the generations that reflects our society today: Chancellor Jaha presented the project of ‘the hundred’ as a way for young delinquents to fulfil their duty and gain redemption, even if it cost them their lives. They were even expected to be grateful, because they’d been judged as criminals and would have been executed anyway, even for relatively petty crimes.

And as The 100 season 4 approaches, the adults’ attitudes towards the kids haven’t changed that much from the show’s premiere.

Related: Previewing The 100 season 4: What to expect when you’re expecting an apocalypse

Generational conflict and tension has remained at the heart of the show throughout the series. The generational focus has not been diluted even as the world has expanded to reveal far more of the culture of the Grounders; in fact, this has only given rise to more conflict as the older members of Skaikru have struggled to accept not only the Grounders’ belief system, but the young age of their Commanders.

As the figurehead for all of the delinquents, lead character Clarke has been undermined and derided at every turn. In season 2, her own mother scoffed at the idea that Clarke and Lexa could lead their people to safety, mocking the Grounder Commander’s age and commenting, “They’re being led by a child.” It was up to Kane to point out that Skaikru were, too, because none of the adults had managed to think of a solution, and it was up to Clarke to save them.

Both Abby and Kane’s attitudes play into the infantilising of the millennial generation. Neither Clarke nor Lexa were children. They were young adults, and they were working towards making a better society where all of their people could survive while the adults were focused on internal power plays. Jaha was ready to leave the young adults in Mount Weather to die, but that’s no surprise; he’d made that decision before.

Abby couldn’t bear losing power to her own daughter, to the extent that it culminated in a scene where she assaulted Raven. The young mechanic was cool and composed in her response, pointing out that Clarke stopped being a child when Abby signed off on her daughter being sent to Earth to die.

Raven’s positioning was clear: Although not condemned by any crimes (even if she had committed the crime that Finn was convicted of), she chose to align herself with the hundred and was the one who chose to come to Earth simply to help. The younger generation, in short, pulled together, and when the older generation landed they brought down their old rules and oppression.

The consequences were overwhelming for the younger characters. They were tasked with saving everyone at the expense of any peace to their own souls. Clarke demonstrated this more than any other character and she ended up fleeing her people, unable to carry the burden of expectation they all had for her. It’s something she wrestled with throughout season 3, and with Earth facing a nuclear apocalypse again, Clarke will have to make peace — not with herself, but with how everyone else sees her if she is to survive.

The 100 season 4 Bellamy

Bellamy, too, will have to find his own identity. Last season, he effectively turned his back on the hundred to win the praise of Pike, and Bellamy upheld and supported his bigotry.

His part in slaughtering the Ark survivors’ 300 Grounder allies will not be easily forgotten. Bellamy wanted to be the hero. He wanted to protect people (specifically the women in his life) who never asked for that, and he wanted to be a part of the establishment.

If The 100 presents a metaphor for the real-life relationship between millennials and Gen X, Bellamy is the one wearing the rose-tinted glasses that younger people are supposed to wear when viewing an establishment that has been willing to regularly criticise later generations.

He had longed to be part of the Guard since he was a boy, and he saw a way to fulfil that old dream and become part of an order that had caused his entire family so much suffering. Bellamy was never quite the hundred: He was older, and his sole concern initially had been protecting his sister. It was easier for him to flit between the different groups within Skaikru than it was for any of the rest of the hundred.

After the events of last season, however, Bellamy now knows the pain he’s caused by his choices. And in season 4, he will have to choose exactly who to put his faith in: Clarke or the old order?

But maybe, in light of the external threat that now threatens humanity’s survival, the two generations will finally be able to pull together. There have been many hints that Clarke and Jaha will find some common ground this season due to the pressures they are facing, and Jaha knows well the cost of leading. Through Clarke, we will see whether lessons can be learned from the mistakes of the generation before.

Octavia once accused Clarke of being just like the council by deciding who was worthy of life. Clarke now must show whether she will follow that path or whether she can be better. The millennial dream of whether we can learn from the repression and conservatism of the past will be on trial in The 100 season 4, as we see just how Clarke plans to lead her friends into this new battle.

The 100‘ season 4 premieres February 1 at 9/8c on The CW

Teen Wolf season 6 will be its last — but for how long? In an age of revivals, reboots, and remakes, we really don’t know if this will be the end.

Thanks to Netflix, Gilmore Girls returned to add another chapter to its beloved story. And just this month alone, we got news that Charmed and Will & Grace will both be returning to our screens as well.

So, yes, this is the final season of Teen Wolf, but as fans, we can always hope to see more one day in the future.

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Teen Wolf season 6 will be its last — but for how long? In an age of revivals, reboots, and remakes, we really don’t know if this will be the end.

Thanks to Netflix, Gilmore Girls returned to add another chapter to its beloved story. And just this month alone, we got news that Charmed and Will & Grace will both be returning to our screens as well.

So, yes, this is the final season of Teen Wolf, but as fans, we can always hope to see more one day in the future.

And apparently Teen Wolf creator and showrunner Jeff Davis must keep that in mind as well.

Speaking to EW about how series finales have changed in the era of reboots, Davis says it’s smart to keep the series ending open enough to allow for the possibility of a revival down the line.

However, this certainly comes with some concerns as well. “One of the things it does is keep you from killing off a lot of characters,” he says. “So the series-ending episode where you blow up the entire world and kill off half your main characters isn’t the smartest thing to do anymore.”

Killing half your main characters would be a shock, but not necessarily a good one. Today’s media is consumed so intensely by its fans that a series finale like that has the potential to put an audience off the property for good.

So not only do you have to worry about the potential for a revival with half your players in the ground, but you have to worry about whether your original fans will even want to tune in for more. That could make or break the whole idea of a revival.

But what about on the other side of that? Creators want their stories to leave a lasting impression, and what better way to do that than to have one of your main characters sacrifice themselves for their friends?

“I do worry that it makes finales less impactful — you don’t want to give a half-assed ending,” Davis says of the need to keep a potential revival in mind. “You want a story to feel like it finishes.”

And that’s something fans of Teen Wolf have been worrying over since it was first announced season 6 would be the show’s last. Who will we lose in this final season, and what impact will that make on our overall feelings about the series?

We’ve come too far to lose someone we cared about from day one, but we’ve also invested too much time to see a mediocre ending. It’s a challenging balance that all fans of Teen Wolf are hoping Davis and his team are up for.

What do you think of the idea for an eventual ‘Teen Wolf‘ revival?

When the first rumors of a Charmed reboot came out a few years ago I started a mental list of what it has to have. Now that it’s officially happening here’s what I think a ’70s-era Charmed show can still pull off.

The mythology of Charmed runs deep. So deep, in fact, that they could have set this during the founding of America and we’d still be able to get a Charmed feeling thanks to the original show’s flashbacks. (But I’m happy it’s not set way back then.)

Given the show’s history, I’m not worried about it taking place in the ’70s; I’m actually excited about it. It’s an original take on how we can learn more about the Halliwell family before the Power of Three was old enough to realize they were the most powerful witches in the world, and I’m excited to see what they bring to it.

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When the first rumors of a Charmed reboot came out a few years ago I started a mental list of what it has to have. Now that it’s officially happening here’s what I think a ’70s-era Charmed show can still pull off.

The mythology of Charmed runs deep. So deep, in fact, that they could have set this during the founding of America and we’d still be able to get a Charmed feeling thanks to the original show’s flashbacks. (But I’m happy it’s not set way back then.)

Given the show’s history, I’m not worried about it taking place in the ’70s; I’m actually excited about it. It’s an original take on how we can learn more about the Halliwell family before the Power of Three was old enough to realize they were the most powerful witches in the world, and I’m excited to see what they bring to it.

With that being said, it’s hard to think of anything Charmed related happening without its important mythology and history, so there are just a few things this reboot absolutely has to have.

Whitelighters

Whitelighters are the angels in the Charmed universe, and without them we wouldn’t have Leo or Paige and we wouldn’t have the almost never-ending source of wisdom and guidance we’re so used to seeing.

It scares me to think about this happening without the Halliwell family at all, but if that is the (horrible) route they choose to go, then they’re definitely going to need a Whitelighter to guide the characters and tell them what’s up. Without the Book of Shadows, a Whitelighter is going to be the only way the new witches will have any hope of figuring out what is going on.

And I will never get sick of seeing people orb everywhere — that’s one of the best parts of the original show, tbh.

Darklighters/Demons

On the opposite end of angels there are always demons, so it’d be a missed opportunity to not include them in this reboot. Darklighters are the only thing that could kill a Whitelighter, so it makes sense to bring them into the picture as well so we could get some d-d-d-drama.

The only hesitance I have about this new reboot bringing Darklighters and demons into the mix is that today’s audience seem enthralled with demons and fighting, and I worry there’s not going to be as much character growth in the newer episodes as there was with the original series.

I don’t want a Charmed reboot to be all about the demon fighting and not enough about the sisters and their relationship, but hopefully the fact that it’s helmed by women will help prevent that from happening.

Pre-bound Charmed ones

As any well-informed Charmed fan will tell you, the main girls (Prue, Piper, and Phoebe) had their powers bound/stripped when they were children so they could grow up without the threats of demons and death. If the show is about the Halliwell family, I’m hoping it begins at least a good six months or so before their powers get taken away from them.

There are so many questions I have about the pre-bound Charmed ones: Did they have powers in the womb like Wyatt, or was that just because Wyatt was the product of a Charmed one and a Whitelighter? Did the girls having powers bring so much evil that Grandma had no choice but to take them away? What was life like for Penny and Patty with the girls as youngsters? Sure, we saw glimpses of that briefly in the main series, but there’s still so much more to know!

I’m hoping that if the show does indeed take place around the Halliwell family in the ’70s, we’ll get to see what led up to Grandma Penny binding their powers. Hopefully it might be an even bigger surprise and twist than we all thought.

Kick-ass Penny

Speaking of Penny Halliwell, the grandmother to the Charmed Ones and mother of Patty Halliwell, she is one bad-ass bitch. We know this because of the several times she’s been summoned by the sisters for help (both supernatural and remedial).

There’s no way the show could revolve around the Halliwell family in the ’70s and not include one of the most bad-ass witches in the family line. Witnessing Penny kick some ass is something we all need to see, and I’m sure it would be one of the best parts of the whole series.

I know the show is still in its beginning stages and there are absolutely no cast members involved yet, but I would die to see Jennifer Rhodes reprise her role as Penny just to see that unfiltered sass come back to my screen.

Cameos galore!

Don’t get me started on how ticked I am that this is a prequel happening in the ’70s, if it even is that. When I think Charmed, I think Phoebe, Piper, Prue, Paige, Leo, etc. So naturally, to make up for this hideous decision in setting, the show has to make up for it by coming up with some excuse to bring back the original girls.

Alyssa Milano, Holly Marie Combs and Rose McGowan have all said they’d be totally down to return for a Charmed reunion, so it hurts that whoever decided to put this reboot in the ’70s basically took that interest and threw it out the window. I’m hoping they work in a way to get the girls to show up in this series, and not just once.

Having the main girls appear just once in this reboot would basically be blasphemy, so hopefully the main characters figure out a way to find out about the existence of the Charmed Ones and use some sort of spell to contact them occasionally for help.

Oh, and it wouldn’t hurt to see Leo, Chris, Wyatt or all the other characters every one in a while, too.

Bonus: Reference the original theme song

This is way less likely than anything else, but I’m hoping that when the show starts up they utilize the show’s original theme song, How Soon Is Now by The Smiths.

It’s a damn shame that the entire series is on Netflix but with some rip-off theme song. You can’t have Charmed without The Smiths! Well, you can as evidenced by Netflix, but you really, really shouldn’t.

The music license to use the song expired, but please, will someone contact The Smiths and politely ask them to let us hear it with Charmed again? Here’s the original theme for those of you who miss it like I do.

What do you want in the ‘Charmed’ reboot?