HBO has released a press statement announcing the titles of episodes 2×01-2×05, along with the episode descriptions! Spoilers ahead!

This is the complete press release from HBO:

EMMY®- AND GOLDEN GLOBE-WINNING HBO SERIES
GAME OF THRONES BEGINS ITS SECOND SEASON APRIL 1

War is coming to Westeros. As the cold winds rise and five kings vie for power, bonds are forged and broken, identities are challenged and romance blossoms. With the stakes higher than ever before, who will survive the chaos to claim the Iron Throne?

Based on the bestselling fantasy book series by George R.R. Martin, GAME OF THRONES is an epic drama set in the world of Westeros, where ambitious men and women of both honor and ill-repute live in a land whose summers and winters can last years. The Emmy®- and Golden Globe-winning fantasy series begins its second season SUNDAY, APRIL 1 (9:00-10:00 p.m. ET/PT), exclusively on HBO, followed by other episodes on subsequent Sundays at the same time.
Created and executive produced by David Benioff and D.B. Weiss, the ten-episode second season of GAME OF THRONES plays out against the backdrop of a fast-approaching winter – the season of the white raven. In King’s Landing, the coveted Iron Throne is occupied by cruel young Joffrey, counseled by his conniving mother Cersei and his uncle Tyrion, who has been appointed Hand of the King.

But the Lannister hold on the Throne is under assault on many fronts. Robb Stark, son of Ned Stark, the slain Lord of Winterfell, seeks autonomy in the North and has taken Cersei’s brother Jaime prisoner in battle. Daenerys Targaryen looks to shore up her depleted power in the East with her three newborn dragons. Stannis Baratheon, brother of the late King Robert, rejects Joffrey’s legitimacy and aligns with a powerful priestess to raise a naval attack. And Renly, Stannis’ charismatic brother, has maintained his own claim since fleeing King’s Landing.
In the meantime, a new leader is rising among the wildlings North of the Wall, adding fresh perils for Jon Snow and the order of the Night’s Watch. With tensions and treaties, animosity and alliances, the second season of GAME OF THRONES will be a thrilling journey through an unforgettable landscape.

Returning cast members include: Emmy® and Golden Globe winner Peter Dinklage (Tyrion Lannister), Michelle Fairley (Catelyn Stark), Lena Headey (Cersei Lannister), Emilia Clarke (Daenerys Targaryen), Nikolaj Coster-Waldau (Jaime Lannister), Aidan Gillen (Petyr “Littlefinger” Baelish), Iain Glen (Jorah Mormont), Kit Harington (Jon Snow), Richard Madden (Robb Stark), Maisie Williams (Arya Stark), Isaac Hempstead Wright (Bran Stark), Sophie Turner (Sansa Stark), Jack Gleeson (Joffrey Baratheon), Alfie Allen (Theon Greyjoy) and Rory McCann (Sandor “The Hound” Clegane).
Also returning for the second season are: Charles Dance (Tywin Lannister), Jerome Flynn (Bronn), Conleth Hill (Varys), John Bradley (Samwell Tarly), James Cosmo (Commander Mormont), Sibel Kekilli (Shae), Donald Sumpter (Maester Luwin), Ron Donachie (Rodrik Cassel) and Gethin Anthony (Renly Baratheon).

New cast members in the second season include: Stephen Dillane (Stannis Baratheon), Gwendoline Christie (Brienne), Carice van Houten (Melisandre), Liam Cunningham (Davos Seaworth), Natalie Dormer (Margaery Tyrell) and Rose Leslie (Ygritte).

April’s episodes:

Episode #11: “The North Remembers”
Debut: SUNDAY, APRIL 1 (9:00-10:00 p.m. ET/PT)
Other HBO playdates: April 1 (10:00 p.m., 11:00 p.m.), 3 (11:05 p.m.), 4 (10:00 p.m.) and 7 (10:15 p.m.)
HBO2 playdates: April 2 (9:00 p.m.), 5 (8:00 p.m.), 6 (midnight), 8 (4:00 p.m.) and 20 (9:00 p.m.)
As Robb Stark and his northern army continue the war against the Lannisters, Tyrion arrives in King’s Landing to counsel Joffrey and temper the young king’s excesses. On the island of Dragonstone, Stannis Baratheon plots an invasion to claim his late brother’s throne, allying himself with the fiery Melisandre, a strange priestess of a stranger god. Across the sea, Daenerys, her three young dragons and khalasar trek through the Red Waste in search of allies, or water. In the North, Bran presides over a threadbare Winterfell, while beyond the Wall, Jon Snow and the Night’s Watch must shelter with a devious wildling.
Written by David Benioff and D.B. Weiss; directed by Alan Taylor.

Episode #12: “The Night Lands”
Debut: SUNDAY, APRIL 8 (9:00-10:00 p.m.)
Other HBO playdates: April 8 (11:00 p.m.), 10 (11:00 p.m.), 11 (10:00 p.m.) and 14 (1:00 a.m. ET/11:45 p.m. PT)
HBO2 playdates: April 9 (9:00 p.m.), 12 (8:00 p.m.), 13 (midnight), 15 (2:35 p.m.) and 20 (10:00 p.m.)
In the wake of a bloody purge in the capital, Tyrion chastens Cersei for alienating the king’s subjects. On the road north, Arya shares a secret with Gendry, a Night’s Watch recruit. With supplies dwindling, one of Dany’s scouts returns with news of their position. After nine years as a Stark ward, Theon Greyjoy reunites with his father Balon, who wants to restore the ancient Kingdom of the Iron Islands. Davos enlists Salladhor Saan, a pirate, to join forces with Stannis and Melisandre for a naval invasion of King’s Landing.
Written by David Benioff and D.B. Weiss; directed by Alan Taylor.

Episode #13: “What Is Dead May Never Die”
Debut: SUNDAY, APRIL 15 (9:00-10:00 p.m.)
Other HBO playdates: April 15 (11:05 p.m.), 17 (11:00 p.m.), 18 (10:05 p.m.) and 21 (11:00 p.m.)
HBO2 playdates: April 16 (8:00 p.m.), 19 (8:00 p.m.), 20 (11:00 p.m.) and 22 (6:00 p.m.)
At the Red Keep, Tyrion plots three alliances through the promise of marriage. Catelyn arrives in the Stormlands to forge an alliance of her own. But King Renly, his new wife Margaery and her brother Loras Tyrell have other plans. At Winterfell, Luwin tries to decipher Bran’s dreams.
Written by Bryan Cogman; directed by Alik Sakharov.

Episode #14: “Garden of Bones”
Debut: SUNDAY, APRIL 22 (9:00-10:00 p.m.)
Other HBO playdates: April 22 (11:00 p.m.), 24 (11:00 p.m.), 25 (10:00 p.m.) and 28 (1:30 a.m. ET/12:15 a.m. PT)
HBO2 playdates: April 23 (8:00 p.m.), 26 (8:00 p.m.), 27 (midnight) and 29 (1:10 p.m.)
Joffrey punishes Sansa for Robb’s victories, while Tyrion and Bronn scramble to temper the king’s cruelty. Catelyn entreats Stannis and Renly to forego their ambitions and unite against the Lannisters. Dany and her exhausted khalasar arrive at the gates of Qarth, a prosperous city with strong walls and rulers who greet her outside them. Tyrion coerces a queen’s man into being his eyes and ears. Arya and Gendry are taken to Harrenhal, where their lives rest in the hands of “The Mountain,” Gregor Clegane. Davos must revert to his old ways and smuggle Melisandre into a secret cove.
Written by Vanessa Taylor; directed by David Petrarca.

Episode #15: “The Ghost of Harrenhal”
Debut: SUNDAY, APRIL 29 (9:00-10:00 p.m.)
Other HBO playdates: April 29 (11:00 p.m.) and May 1 (11:00 p.m.), 2 (10:00 p.m.) and 5 (11:30 p.m.)
HBO2 playdate: April 30 (9:00 p.m.)
The end of the Baratheon rivalry drives Catelyn to flee and Littlefinger to act. At King’s Landing, Tyrion’s source alerts him to Joffrey’s flawed defense plan and a mysterious secret weapon. Theon sails to the Stony Shore to prove he’s worthy to be called Ironborn. In Harrenhal, Arya receives a promise from Jaqen H’ghar, one of three prisoners she saved from the Gold Cloaks. The Night’s Watch arrive at the Fist of the First Men, an ancient fortress where they hope to stem the advance of the wildling army.
Written by David Benioff and D.B. Weiss; directed by David Petrarca.

In Sept. 2011, GAME OF THRONES received two Emmys®, including Outstanding Main Title Design and Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Drama Series for Peter Dinklage, who also received a Golden Globe for Best Performance by an Actor in a Supporting Role in a Series, Mini-Series or Motion Picture Made for Television.
The first season of GAME OF THRONES inspired critical raves. TV Guide called the show “a crowning triumph” and “brilliant,” while the Los Angeles Times termed it “a great and thundering series,” as well as “wild and bewitching.” The Hollywood Reporter praised the “excellent storytelling, superb acting and stunning visual effects,” and the New York Post observed that the “art directing, acting and incredible sets are as breathtaking as the massive scope of the series.”
The executive producers of GAME OF THRONES are David Benioff, D.B. Weiss, Carolyn Strauss, Frank Doelger; co-executive producers, George R.R. Martin, Vanessa Taylor, Alan Taylor, Guymon Casady, Vince Gerardis; produced by Bernadette Caulfield.

It’s pretty detailed information for fans who haven’t read the books!

At a time when the divide between the generations has arguably never been greater, The 100 encapsulates the struggle of millennials more than any other current show.

This article was submitted by Hypable reader Stephanie Farnsworth.

The media churns out article after article about the laziness of millennials, and then complains about how we work too hard. Millennials are branded “snowflakes” even as we struggle to pay rent and bear the consequences of the economic fall-out that we didn’t cause.

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At a time when the divide between the generations has arguably never been greater, The 100 encapsulates the struggle of millennials more than any other current show.

This article was submitted by Hypable reader Stephanie Farnsworth.

The media churns out article after article about the laziness of millennials, and then complains about how we work too hard. Millennials are branded “snowflakes” even as we struggle to pay rent and bear the consequences of the economic fall-out that we didn’t cause.

The CW drama The 100, which is entering its fourth season in February, rather bluntly captures that sense of young people paying the price of previous generations; at the beginning of the series, a council of adult politicians literally sent teenagers to a radiation-soaked earth to try to save their own society.

The 100 season 1 Jaha

The pilot episode revealed the extent of the power imbalance between the generations that reflects our society today: Chancellor Jaha presented the project of ‘the hundred’ as a way for young delinquents to fulfil their duty and gain redemption, even if it cost them their lives. They were even expected to be grateful, because they’d been judged as criminals and would have been executed anyway, even for relatively petty crimes.

And as The 100 season 4 approaches, the adults’ attitudes towards the kids haven’t changed that much from the show’s premiere.

Related: Previewing The 100 season 4: What to expect when you’re expecting an apocalypse

Generational conflict and tension has remained at the heart of the show throughout the series. The generational focus has not been diluted even as the world has expanded to reveal far more of the culture of the Grounders; in fact, this has only given rise to more conflict as the older members of Skaikru have struggled to accept not only the Grounders’ belief system, but the young age of their Commanders.

As the figurehead for all of the delinquents, lead character Clarke has been undermined and derided at every turn. In season 2, her own mother scoffed at the idea that Clarke and Lexa could lead their people to safety, mocking the Grounder Commander’s age and commenting, “They’re being led by a child.” It was up to Kane to point out that Skaikru were, too, because none of the adults had managed to think of a solution, and it was up to Clarke to save them.

Both Abby and Kane’s attitudes play into the infantilising of the millennial generation. Neither Clarke nor Lexa were children. They were young adults, and they were working towards making a better society where all of their people could survive while the adults were focused on internal power plays. Jaha was ready to leave the young adults in Mount Weather to die, but that’s no surprise; he’d made that decision before.

Abby couldn’t bear losing power to her own daughter, to the extent that it culminated in a scene where she assaulted Raven. The young mechanic was cool and composed in her response, pointing out that Clarke stopped being a child when Abby signed off on her daughter being sent to Earth to die.

Raven’s positioning was clear: Although not condemned by any crimes (even if she had committed the crime that Finn was convicted of), she chose to align herself with the hundred and was the one who chose to come to Earth simply to help. The younger generation, in short, pulled together, and when the older generation landed they brought down their old rules and oppression.

The consequences were overwhelming for the younger characters. They were tasked with saving everyone at the expense of any peace to their own souls. Clarke demonstrated this more than any other character and she ended up fleeing her people, unable to carry the burden of expectation they all had for her. It’s something she wrestled with throughout season 3, and with Earth facing a nuclear apocalypse again, Clarke will have to make peace — not with herself, but with how everyone else sees her if she is to survive.

The 100 season 4 Bellamy

Bellamy, too, will have to find his own identity. Last season, he effectively turned his back on the hundred to win the praise of Pike, and Bellamy upheld and supported his bigotry.

His part in slaughtering the Ark survivors’ 300 Grounder allies will not be easily forgotten. Bellamy wanted to be the hero. He wanted to protect people (specifically the women in his life) who never asked for that, and he wanted to be a part of the establishment.

If The 100 presents a metaphor for the real-life relationship between millennials and Gen X, Bellamy is the one wearing the rose-tinted glasses that younger people are supposed to wear when viewing an establishment that has been willing to regularly criticise later generations.

He had longed to be part of the Guard since he was a boy, and he saw a way to fulfil that old dream and become part of an order that had caused his entire family so much suffering. Bellamy was never quite the hundred: He was older, and his sole concern initially had been protecting his sister. It was easier for him to flit between the different groups within Skaikru than it was for any of the rest of the hundred.

After the events of last season, however, Bellamy now knows the pain he’s caused by his choices. And in season 4, he will have to choose exactly who to put his faith in: Clarke or the old order?

But maybe, in light of the external threat that now threatens humanity’s survival, the two generations will finally be able to pull together. There have been many hints that Clarke and Jaha will find some common ground this season due to the pressures they are facing, and Jaha knows well the cost of leading. Through Clarke, we will see whether lessons can be learned from the mistakes of the generation before.

Octavia once accused Clarke of being just like the council by deciding who was worthy of life. Clarke now must show whether she will follow that path or whether she can be better. The millennial dream of whether we can learn from the repression and conservatism of the past will be on trial in The 100 season 4, as we see just how Clarke plans to lead her friends into this new battle.

The 100‘ season 4 premieres February 1 at 9/8c on The CW

Teen Wolf season 6 will be its last — but for how long? In an age of revivals, reboots, and remakes, we really don’t know if this will be the end.

Thanks to Netflix, Gilmore Girls returned to add another chapter to its beloved story. And just this month alone, we got news that Charmed and Will & Grace will both be returning to our screens as well.

So, yes, this is the final season of Teen Wolf, but as fans, we can always hope to see more one day in the future.

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Teen Wolf season 6 will be its last — but for how long? In an age of revivals, reboots, and remakes, we really don’t know if this will be the end.

Thanks to Netflix, Gilmore Girls returned to add another chapter to its beloved story. And just this month alone, we got news that Charmed and Will & Grace will both be returning to our screens as well.

So, yes, this is the final season of Teen Wolf, but as fans, we can always hope to see more one day in the future.

And apparently Teen Wolf creator and showrunner Jeff Davis must keep that in mind as well.

Speaking to EW about how series finales have changed in the era of reboots, Davis says it’s smart to keep the series ending open enough to allow for the possibility of a revival down the line.

However, this certainly comes with some concerns as well. “One of the things it does is keep you from killing off a lot of characters,” he says. “So the series-ending episode where you blow up the entire world and kill off half your main characters isn’t the smartest thing to do anymore.”

Killing half your main characters would be a shock, but not necessarily a good one. Today’s media is consumed so intensely by its fans that a series finale like that has the potential to put an audience off the property for good.

So not only do you have to worry about the potential for a revival with half your players in the ground, but you have to worry about whether your original fans will even want to tune in for more. That could make or break the whole idea of a revival.

But what about on the other side of that? Creators want their stories to leave a lasting impression, and what better way to do that than to have one of your main characters sacrifice themselves for their friends?

“I do worry that it makes finales less impactful — you don’t want to give a half-assed ending,” Davis says of the need to keep a potential revival in mind. “You want a story to feel like it finishes.”

And that’s something fans of Teen Wolf have been worrying over since it was first announced season 6 would be the show’s last. Who will we lose in this final season, and what impact will that make on our overall feelings about the series?

We’ve come too far to lose someone we cared about from day one, but we’ve also invested too much time to see a mediocre ending. It’s a challenging balance that all fans of Teen Wolf are hoping Davis and his team are up for.

What do you think of the idea for an eventual ‘Teen Wolf‘ revival?

When the first rumors of a Charmed reboot came out a few years ago I started a mental list of what it has to have. Now that it’s officially happening here’s what I think a ’70s-era Charmed show can still pull off.

The mythology of Charmed runs deep. So deep, in fact, that they could have set this during the founding of America and we’d still be able to get a Charmed feeling thanks to the original show’s flashbacks. (But I’m happy it’s not set way back then.)

Given the show’s history, I’m not worried about it taking place in the ’70s; I’m actually excited about it. It’s an original take on how we can learn more about the Halliwell family before the Power of Three was old enough to realize they were the most powerful witches in the world, and I’m excited to see what they bring to it.

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When the first rumors of a Charmed reboot came out a few years ago I started a mental list of what it has to have. Now that it’s officially happening here’s what I think a ’70s-era Charmed show can still pull off.

The mythology of Charmed runs deep. So deep, in fact, that they could have set this during the founding of America and we’d still be able to get a Charmed feeling thanks to the original show’s flashbacks. (But I’m happy it’s not set way back then.)

Given the show’s history, I’m not worried about it taking place in the ’70s; I’m actually excited about it. It’s an original take on how we can learn more about the Halliwell family before the Power of Three was old enough to realize they were the most powerful witches in the world, and I’m excited to see what they bring to it.

With that being said, it’s hard to think of anything Charmed related happening without its important mythology and history, so there are just a few things this reboot absolutely has to have.

Whitelighters

Whitelighters are the angels in the Charmed universe, and without them we wouldn’t have Leo or Paige and we wouldn’t have the almost never-ending source of wisdom and guidance we’re so used to seeing.

It scares me to think about this happening without the Halliwell family at all, but if that is the (horrible) route they choose to go, then they’re definitely going to need a Whitelighter to guide the characters and tell them what’s up. Without the Book of Shadows, a Whitelighter is going to be the only way the new witches will have any hope of figuring out what is going on.

And I will never get sick of seeing people orb everywhere — that’s one of the best parts of the original show, tbh.

Darklighters/Demons

On the opposite end of angels there are always demons, so it’d be a missed opportunity to not include them in this reboot. Darklighters are the only thing that could kill a Whitelighter, so it makes sense to bring them into the picture as well so we could get some d-d-d-drama.

The only hesitance I have about this new reboot bringing Darklighters and demons into the mix is that today’s audience seem enthralled with demons and fighting, and I worry there’s not going to be as much character growth in the newer episodes as there was with the original series.

I don’t want a Charmed reboot to be all about the demon fighting and not enough about the sisters and their relationship, but hopefully the fact that it’s helmed by women will help prevent that from happening.

Pre-bound Charmed ones

As any well-informed Charmed fan will tell you, the main girls (Prue, Piper, and Phoebe) had their powers bound/stripped when they were children so they could grow up without the threats of demons and death. If the show is about the Halliwell family, I’m hoping it begins at least a good six months or so before their powers get taken away from them.

There are so many questions I have about the pre-bound Charmed ones: Did they have powers in the womb like Wyatt, or was that just because Wyatt was the product of a Charmed one and a Whitelighter? Did the girls having powers bring so much evil that Grandma had no choice but to take them away? What was life like for Penny and Patty with the girls as youngsters? Sure, we saw glimpses of that briefly in the main series, but there’s still so much more to know!

I’m hoping that if the show does indeed take place around the Halliwell family in the ’70s, we’ll get to see what led up to Grandma Penny binding their powers. Hopefully it might be an even bigger surprise and twist than we all thought.

Kick-ass Penny

Speaking of Penny Halliwell, the grandmother to the Charmed Ones and mother of Patty Halliwell, she is one bad-ass bitch. We know this because of the several times she’s been summoned by the sisters for help (both supernatural and remedial).

There’s no way the show could revolve around the Halliwell family in the ’70s and not include one of the most bad-ass witches in the family line. Witnessing Penny kick some ass is something we all need to see, and I’m sure it would be one of the best parts of the whole series.

I know the show is still in its beginning stages and there are absolutely no cast members involved yet, but I would die to see Jennifer Rhodes reprise her role as Penny just to see that unfiltered sass come back to my screen.

Cameos galore!

Don’t get me started on how ticked I am that this is a prequel happening in the ’70s, if it even is that. When I think Charmed, I think Phoebe, Piper, Prue, Paige, Leo, etc. So naturally, to make up for this hideous decision in setting, the show has to make up for it by coming up with some excuse to bring back the original girls.

Alyssa Milano, Holly Marie Combs and Rose McGowan have all said they’d be totally down to return for a Charmed reunion, so it hurts that whoever decided to put this reboot in the ’70s basically took that interest and threw it out the window. I’m hoping they work in a way to get the girls to show up in this series, and not just once.

Having the main girls appear just once in this reboot would basically be blasphemy, so hopefully the main characters figure out a way to find out about the existence of the Charmed Ones and use some sort of spell to contact them occasionally for help.

Oh, and it wouldn’t hurt to see Leo, Chris, Wyatt or all the other characters every one in a while, too.

Bonus: Reference the original theme song

This is way less likely than anything else, but I’m hoping that when the show starts up they utilize the show’s original theme song, How Soon Is Now by The Smiths.

It’s a damn shame that the entire series is on Netflix but with some rip-off theme song. You can’t have Charmed without The Smiths! Well, you can as evidenced by Netflix, but you really, really shouldn’t.

The music license to use the song expired, but please, will someone contact The Smiths and politely ask them to let us hear it with Charmed again? Here’s the original theme for those of you who miss it like I do.

What do you want in the ‘Charmed’ reboot?