As the longest running sci-fi show of all time, Doctor Who has a rather large repertoire of creatures, villains, and bug-eyed monsters. But who (or rather, what) is the best monster in Who history? Hypable takes a crack at naming the top 10!

10. The Silurians

The Silurians are reptilian humanoid creatures who have been hibernating underneath the Earth for thousands of years, pre-dating humans by a long way. They have futuristic technology well in advance of anything Homo sapiens have ever managed to develop. With an intricate and diverse society, Silurians have just as much conflict amongst themselves as they do with their surface counterparts. In the Classic series, the Silurians have three eyes – the third of which is used for telepathy – but in their 2010 redesign they more closely resemble humans. Nearly every time The Doctor meets the Silurians, a peaceful solution is found despite some factions of both humans and Silurians intent on war. Aside from presenting viewers with some difficult questions to ask themselves, the Silurians are a deep race that command our sympathy and empathy as well as fear.


The Doctor and the Silurian leader reach peace
First appearance:
“Doctor Who and The Silurians” (1970)
Home planet:
Earth

Why we love them:
The Silurian species present a deep and thought-provoking idea for anyone watching one of their episodes – what if there was a species living on Earth who had more claim to it than we do? The best thing about them is that they are actually credible creatures.

Best quote:
“Wipe the vermin from the surface!”

9. Ood

Despite being a benevolent species that live to serve their Masters, The Ood have a terrible track record for going completely crazy and trying to kill everything in sight. In fact, two-thirds of their appearances see the species possessed by dark forces. The Ood have a tragic but compelling back story, becoming slaves to human colonies after their hive center was destroyed. They have become almost as iconic and popular as the Daleks and Cybermen, commanding our sympathy as well as fear in a way that so many Who monsters fall short of.


The Ood are possessed and rebel against their cruel human captors
First appearance:
“The Impossible Planet” (2006)
Home planet:
The Ood Sphere

Why we love them:
The telepathic orbs they hold and Davey-Jones style tentacle beards give the Ood a really striking appearance. Their heart-breaking back story also makes you really feel for the species, but their knack for being possessed always puts you on edge whenever an Ood is on screen.
Best quote:
“The Circle must be broken.”

8. The Zygons

The Zygons are the only creatures on this list who have yet to appear in the revived show, but this injustice will reportedly be assuaged in the upcoming seventh series. After their home world was destroyed by an explosion, a solitary Zygon spaceship landed in the depths of Loch Ness, where a colony of survivors took refuge. Feeding from the Loch Ness monster, The Zygons were able to exist and develop biological technology that meant that their ships themselves were alive. Freakiest of all is their shape shifting abilities, which allow them to infiltrate The Doctor and his companions through impersonation of allies. Whenever the Zygons are around, characters and viewers alike are constantly on edge – terrified that the people they see could actually be blood-thirsty monsters.

Image credit

Original trailer for “Terror of the Zygons” First appearance:
“Terror of The Zygons” (1975)
Home planet:
Unknown

Why we love them:
They look awesome, especially by Classic Who standards, and shape shifters are enough to get anyone interested. They’re also David Tennant’s favourite monster, which is enough to be getting on with.

Best quote:
“You admire our technology?”

7. Midnight Monster
The Midnight monster is unique in that we never find out its real name or what it looks like. Instead of lasers or claws, this alien uses the simple trick of mimicking to inject copious amounts of dread in the only episode that it appears in. When The Doctor is on a spaceship that draws to a sudden halt, the Midnight monster is outside and copies the knocking of the ships passengers. It then rips off the cock-pit, and possesses a business woman called Sky. She begins to copy the speech of the ships passengers, before speaking in sync and then uttering words that the victims have yet to say themselves. While the alien is clearly massively vicious, vindictive, and vigorous we never actually see it on screen. This works in the monsters favour – the mystery is far more discomforting and ominous than anything CG or prosthetics could ever achieve.


The passengers are terrified as Sky copies The Doctor
First appearance:
“Midnight” (2008)
Home planet:
Midnight

Why we love it:
More of a psychological idea than a creature, the Midnight monster is both a very simple and horrifying concept. The slow-burning tension of someone copying people stays with you far longer than farting aliens in fat-people suits.
Best quote:
“Why are you repeating?”

6. The Master

Arguably The Doctor’s arch-nemesis, The Master has been a popular and staple villain in Doctor Who history for over 40 years. The part has been played by six different actors over the course of the programme, and was conceived as a “Moriarty to The Doctor’s Sherlock Holmes.” A renegade himself, The Master becomes one of the only two living Timelords when he first appears in New Who (the other of course being The Doctor). With psychotic tenancies and a serious grudge against The Doctor and the rest of the universe, this villain will stop at nothing to take down our hero.


The Master returns and regenerates
First appearance:
“Terror of the Autons” (1971)
Home planet:
Gallifrey

Why we love him:
The archetypal super villain, The Master is genuinely psychotic and a very worthy adversary to the benevolence of The Doctor. Not only does he want to take over the universe, he actually succeeds several times. Gotta love a successful psycho.

Best quote:
“Here come the drums!”

5. Gas Mask Zombies

Victims of a technological plague during World War II, The Gas Mask Zombies are accidentally created by Jack Harkness after he crashes a stolen space ship. The infection stems from a young child named Jamie, who was brought back from the brink of death by Chula nanogenes. Having never seen humans before, the usually miraculous genes assume that the boy’s appearance is how all of the race is supposed to look. As a consequence, anyone who comes into contact with them is “repaired” and transformed into an undead donning a gas mask and searching for their mummy. These “creatures” are one of the few allusions to zombies in the entire series, with a clever and often horrific explanation ending in a dramatic climax. With a similar origin as the Cybermen, the repaired human beings provide the darkest two-part of the first series of revived Who.


The Doctor, Rose and Jack are surprised by a Zombie
First appearance:
“The Empty Child” (2005)
Home planet:
Earth

Why we love them:
Children are terrifying. Undead children with gas masks that ask everyone the same question are beyond terrifying – they’re also awesome. The idea of zombies roaming around a blitzed London is one of the greatest in Who history.

Best quote:
“Are you my Mummy?”

4. The Silence

Alluded to throughout the entire fifth series, The Silence are eventually revealed to be a species (and then a whole religious cult) that have been lurking in the shadows of Earth since the dawn of time. Closely resembling Edvard Munch’s The Scream, the aliens have sunken eyes and swollen hands which they use to electrocute anyone who crosses their path. The Silence influenced human kind’s decisions throughout history, always present but never remembered owing to a mysterious ability to be forgotten about as soon as anyone turns their back. The Silence have so far forced The Doctor into some of his most desperate moments, blowing up the TARDIS and brainwashing a baby River Song into murdering the Timelord. All of this is to try and prevent the answer of the oldest question in the universe, which will result in the religion and species “falling.” Given that we will soon be getting the aforementioned answer to the question — “Doctor Who?” — we certainly haven’t seen the last of these villains.


The Doctor and The Silence face off
First appearance:
“The Impossible Astronaut” (2011)
Home planet:
Unknown

Why we love them:
Imagine seeing an alien, turning to run from it, and forgetting why you ran in the first place. The Silence aren’t only one of the most dangerous villains in the show, they also seem very powerful and mysterious – having blown up the TARDIS and trained someone to kill The Doctor.

Best quote:
“Silence will fall!”

3. Cybermen

The Cybermen are an iconic part of the longest running sci-fi show of all time, and much the like the series itself, the race is constantly changing. Looking different every time they have appeared throughout the last 49 years, these cyborgs have only retained their iconic facial exterior and hollow voice. When they first appeared in 1966, The Cybermen of Mondas only retained their human hands – but since then their bodies have been almost entirely comprised of metal. Keeping the human brain as a power source but “deleting” any emotional resonance or memory means that they are a cold and ruthless race capable of some of the most cruel acts. Their idea of upgrading is also used by the cyborgs on other creatures, with rats, gorillas, and dogs all falling victim to conversion. In more recent years, The Cybermen have featured sparingly in the series, so we could be seeing an epic full-scale return at some point in the near future, present, or past.


The Cybermen delete!
First appearance:
“The Tenth Planet” (1966)
Home planet:
Mondas

Why we love them:
Voted the second best villain in the show’s history, Cybermen have had fans shrieking for years. The horrifying idea of a humanoid creature “upgrading” their body until there is nothing human left is a fascinating concept, but one that sends shivers down your spine.

Best quote:
“DELETE!”

2. Daleks

Easily as iconic as The Doctor and the TARDIS, The Daleks have achieved pop culture status around the world. Created by evil genius Davros as a solution to a thousand year nuclear war with the Thal, The Daleks are mutant cyborgs feeling only hatred and a burning desire to destroy and “exterminate.” Having faced The Doctor more times than any other enemy, Daleks are his biggest foe and greatest fear. Originally thought to have been murdered in the Time War, which also wiped out Timelords, a Dalek cult managed to escape and slowly rebuild the race until their numbers swelled. They may be the most reliably defeat-able villain in the series, but they have also claimed many victories by killing many of The Doctor’s allies and kidnapping entire planets. Whenever you hear the iconic “Exterminate!”, you know that The Doctor is about to be put to one of his toughest tests.


Trailer for “The Origin of The Daleks”
First appearance:
“The Daleks” (1969)
Home planet:
Skaro

Why we love them:
While they may look uncannily like pepper pots, there is no denying that Daleks can be genuinely terrifying. That robotic voice has had children and adults alike hiding behind the sofa for nearly 50 years – and with a return set for the upcoming series 7, it doesn’t look like these ruthless monsters are going anywhere.

Best quote:
“EXTERMINATE!”

1. Weeping Angels

It couldn’t really have been anything else. The Weeping Angels may be another of Steven Moffat’s simple psychological tricks, but never has it been more terrifying and effective. The Weeping Angels are effectively “living stone” statues that appear to the naked eye to be nothing more than monuments, gargoyles or graveyard memorials. However, as soon as their victims look away — or even famously, blink — they become impossibly fast killing machines. Described by The Doctor as the only creature in the universe to “kill you nicely,” the Weeping Angels murder by sending their victims back in time to live out the rest of their lives away from family and friends. However, the Angels have also been known to snap necks in order to take control of a voice. They have proven a formidable opponent in that there is no way of killing them, avoidance is the only escape. The Weeping Angels are a deeply unsettling race mainly because they resemble every-day statues that can be seen in nearly every town on our planet. What’s more, the deadly and mysterious creatures will return in series 7 to finish off current companions Amy and Rory – so the worst may yet come.


The Doctor warns Sally Sparrow about the Weeping Angels
First appearance:
“Blink” (2007)
Home planet:
Unknown

Why we love them:
The Weeping Angels are one of the most disturbing creatures in TV history, with their inaugural episode “Blink” being particularly unsettling. They’ve already become synonymous with the series, and their abilities give endless opportunities for future stories. When the Angels are on screen, we don’t WANT to blink – for fear of missing a second.

Honourable mentions: Doctor Who has a diverse range of brilliant monsters, and with so many excellent creations it was inevitable that some great aliens would be absent from this list. However, we would like to especially mention Omega, the Vashta Nerada, The Family of Blood, the Autons and The Headless Monks as viable candidates that all only marginally missed out on a spot in this list.

So, there we have it! What do you think of our list? Did we miss out one of your favourites? Include something that didn’t deserve to be there? What would your top 10 be? Join the discussion in the comments below!

Some awesome celebrities turned out today to support the Women’s March on Washington movement, in order to send a strong message to the Trump administration that women’s rights are human rights!

Massive crowds all over the world today are taking part in the Women’s March to send a message about women’s rights. Here at Hypable we give a big shout out to all of those taking a stand today. To show that you’re not alone in this fight, here’s a look at some of the celebrities who were among the estimated four million marchers who showed up to support you in D.C. and all over the world.

Emma Watson and Bonnie Wright

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Some awesome celebrities turned out today to support the Women’s March on Washington movement, in order to send a strong message to the Trump administration that women’s rights are human rights!

Massive crowds all over the world today are taking part in the Women’s March to send a message about women’s rights. Here at Hypable we give a big shout out to all of those taking a stand today. To show that you’re not alone in this fight, here’s a look at some of the celebrities who were among the estimated four million marchers who showed up to support you in D.C. and all over the world.

Emma Watson and Bonnie Wright

Kristen Stewart

Charlize Theron

Madonna

Nick Offerman

Sir Ian McKellen

Candice King, Julie Plec and Kayla Ewell

Mindy Kaling

A photo posted by Mindy Kaling (@mindykaling) on

Darren Criss and Nick Lang

Melissa Benoist

💪#womensmarchonwashington

A photo posted by Melissa Benoist (@melissabenoist) on

Misha Collins

#womansmarch Jacksonville, FL. Fight on!

A photo posted by Misha Collins (@misha) on

Aja Naomi King and Alfred Enoch

Resistance. Respect. #womensmarch 👊🏾

A photo posted by Aja King (@ajanaomi_king) on

Lin-Manuel Miranda

Joss Whedon

Edgar Wright

Miley Cyrus

Ariana Grande

today filled my heart with so much hope !! got to meet many beautiful, passionate people and march alongside my loved ones. the sun came out for us. we are so much stronger and louder than hatred, ignorance, sexism, racism, agism, homophobia, transphobia, body shaming, slut shaming, prejudice, discrimination of all kinds, patriarchal conditioning and the backwards expectations of what a woman should be! I'm so proud of / inspired by everyone who marched today and thankful that there are so many people on this planet currently celebrating how brilliant and magical women truly are! let's keep our voices loud, passionate & peaceful! let's continue being strong for each other and to build each other up! let us stay connected to our divinity. 🌸♡🌌

A photo posted by Ariana Grande (@arianagrande) on

John Legend

#WomensMarch

A photo posted by John Legend (@johnlegend) on

Chrissy Teigen and America Ferrara

Dame Helen Mirren

Gillian Anderson

Bryan Fuller

Neil Gaiman

Kerry Washington with Natalie Portman

… and with Laverne Cox

Ben Barnes

Amy Schumer and Uzo Aduba

A photo posted by @amyschumer on

Gina Rodriguez

Carlos Valdes, Arthur Darvill, Danielle Panabaker, Caity Lotz and Keiynan Lonsdale

Maggie and Jake Gyllenhaal

Kevin McHale

Chris Colfer

Scarlett Johansson

Blake Lively

Yoko Ono and Whoopi Goldberg

Jessica Chastain

Alicia Keys and Janelle Monae

Katy Perry

Zendaya

That's right…

A photo posted by Zendaya (@zendaya) on

Troye Sivan

Willow Smith

Mark Ruffalo

Yip. Well said. Borrowed sign from @dorisfullgrabe design by @dirtybandits #womensmarch Nyc

A photo posted by Mark Ruffalo (@markruffalo) on

Paul Bettany

Eddie Izzard

Stephen Colbert

Did you turn out to support the Women’s March?

Even though we’re halfway through Lucifer season 2, God has only ever been mentioned by name, so we haven’t seen what he looks like — yet.

God has been a major player in Lucifer since the pilot episode, but we’ve never seen his face. Despite what a huge influence he’s had on all of Lucifer’s existence, the show has understandably continued to keep him a mystery (though we did wonder when we’d be seeing him).

But now, according to EW, Timothy Omundson (Psych, Galavant) has been cast in the role of God Johnson.

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Even though we’re halfway through Lucifer season 2, God has only ever been mentioned by name, so we haven’t seen what he looks like — yet.

God has been a major player in Lucifer since the pilot episode, but we’ve never seen his face. Despite what a huge influence he’s had on all of Lucifer’s existence, the show has understandably continued to keep him a mystery (though we did wonder when we’d be seeing him).

But now, according to EW, Timothy Omundson (Psych, Galavant) has been cast in the role of God Johnson.

They don’t specifically say Omundson will be playing the God, but EW reports he is “a patient in a psychiatric hospital, who is charming, enigmatic, and oh yeah, he thinks he’s the one and only God Almighty.”

Lucifer will certainly take issue with someone impersonating any divine being, let alone his father.

However, EW also says, “As Lucifer (Tom Ellis) tries to prove him a phony, he comes to find that ‘God Johnson’ seems to know things that only Lucifer’s true Father would know. Could he really be the Big Guy Upstairs?”

The trick will be to figure out if God Johnson is the real deal or if someone else is feeding him information to lure Lucifer out. At this point, it could be just about anybody — Charlotte, Amenadiel, the man in the hat, or a player we’ve yet to meet.

Omundson has been signed on for only one episode, but that doesn’t necessarily mean we’ll never see him again.

Are you excited Timothy Omundson has been added to ‘Lucifer‘?

At a time when the divide between the generations has arguably never been greater, The 100 encapsulates the struggle of millennials more than any other current show.

This article was submitted by Hypable reader Stephanie Farnsworth.

The media churns out article after article about the laziness of millennials, and then complains about how we work too hard. Millennials are branded “snowflakes” even as we struggle to pay rent and bear the consequences of the economic fall-out that we didn’t cause.

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At a time when the divide between the generations has arguably never been greater, The 100 encapsulates the struggle of millennials more than any other current show.

This article was submitted by Hypable reader Stephanie Farnsworth.

The media churns out article after article about the laziness of millennials, and then complains about how we work too hard. Millennials are branded “snowflakes” even as we struggle to pay rent and bear the consequences of the economic fall-out that we didn’t cause.

The CW drama The 100, which is entering its fourth season in February, rather bluntly captures that sense of young people paying the price of previous generations; at the beginning of the series, a council of adult politicians literally sent teenagers to a radiation-soaked earth to try to save their own society.

The 100 season 1 Jaha

The pilot episode revealed the extent of the power imbalance between the generations that reflects our society today: Chancellor Jaha presented the project of ‘the hundred’ as a way for young delinquents to fulfil their duty and gain redemption, even if it cost them their lives. They were even expected to be grateful, because they’d been judged as criminals and would have been executed anyway, even for relatively petty crimes.

And as The 100 season 4 approaches, the adults’ attitudes towards the kids haven’t changed that much from the show’s premiere.

Related: Previewing The 100 season 4: What to expect when you’re expecting an apocalypse

Generational conflict and tension has remained at the heart of the show throughout the series. The generational focus has not been diluted even as the world has expanded to reveal far more of the culture of the Grounders; in fact, this has only given rise to more conflict as the older members of Skaikru have struggled to accept not only the Grounders’ belief system, but the young age of their Commanders.

As the figurehead for all of the delinquents, lead character Clarke has been undermined and derided at every turn. In season 2, her own mother scoffed at the idea that Clarke and Lexa could lead their people to safety, mocking the Grounder Commander’s age and commenting, “They’re being led by a child.” It was up to Kane to point out that Skaikru were, too, because none of the adults had managed to think of a solution, and it was up to Clarke to save them.

Both Abby and Kane’s attitudes play into the infantilising of the millennial generation. Neither Clarke nor Lexa were children. They were young adults, and they were working towards making a better society where all of their people could survive while the adults were focused on internal power plays. Jaha was ready to leave the young adults in Mount Weather to die, but that’s no surprise; he’d made that decision before.

Abby couldn’t bear losing power to her own daughter, to the extent that it culminated in a scene where she assaulted Raven. The young mechanic was cool and composed in her response, pointing out that Clarke stopped being a child when Abby signed off on her daughter being sent to Earth to die.

Raven’s positioning was clear: Although not condemned by any crimes (even if she had committed the crime that Finn was convicted of), she chose to align herself with the hundred and was the one who chose to come to Earth simply to help. The younger generation, in short, pulled together, and when the older generation landed they brought down their old rules and oppression.

The consequences were overwhelming for the younger characters. They were tasked with saving everyone at the expense of any peace to their own souls. Clarke demonstrated this more than any other character and she ended up fleeing her people, unable to carry the burden of expectation they all had for her. It’s something she wrestled with throughout season 3, and with Earth facing a nuclear apocalypse again, Clarke will have to make peace — not with herself, but with how everyone else sees her if she is to survive.

The 100 season 4 Bellamy

Bellamy, too, will have to find his own identity. Last season, he effectively turned his back on the hundred to win the praise of Pike, and Bellamy upheld and supported his bigotry.

His part in slaughtering the Ark survivors’ 300 Grounder allies will not be easily forgotten. Bellamy wanted to be the hero. He wanted to protect people (specifically the women in his life) who never asked for that, and he wanted to be a part of the establishment.

If The 100 presents a metaphor for the real-life relationship between millennials and Gen X, Bellamy is the one wearing the rose-tinted glasses that younger people are supposed to wear when viewing an establishment that has been willing to regularly criticise later generations.

He had longed to be part of the Guard since he was a boy, and he saw a way to fulfil that old dream and become part of an order that had caused his entire family so much suffering. Bellamy was never quite the hundred: He was older, and his sole concern initially had been protecting his sister. It was easier for him to flit between the different groups within Skaikru than it was for any of the rest of the hundred.

After the events of last season, however, Bellamy now knows the pain he’s caused by his choices. And in season 4, he will have to choose exactly who to put his faith in: Clarke or the old order?

But maybe, in light of the external threat that now threatens humanity’s survival, the two generations will finally be able to pull together. There have been many hints that Clarke and Jaha will find some common ground this season due to the pressures they are facing, and Jaha knows well the cost of leading. Through Clarke, we will see whether lessons can be learned from the mistakes of the generation before.

Octavia once accused Clarke of being just like the council by deciding who was worthy of life. Clarke now must show whether she will follow that path or whether she can be better. The millennial dream of whether we can learn from the repression and conservatism of the past will be on trial in The 100 season 4, as we see just how Clarke plans to lead her friends into this new battle.

The 100‘ season 4 premieres February 1 at 9/8c on The CW