Breaking Bad season 5 part 2 premieres on August 11, so I decided to catch up and watch five seasons of Breaking Bad in five days. To say I enjoyed the show is an understatement, and I’d like to discuss my fascination, along with my season 5 predictions.

Hi, My name is Josh and I’m an addict.

Breaking Bad has always been on my radar, we cover it on Hypable and I would always turn an ear when I heard TV spots for the show as the drug world has always intrigued me. No, I’m not really an addict, but I’m certainly addicted to Breaking Bad. After being turned on to the show by our own Andrew Sims, I went to Netflix and watched five season in five days.

You read that right – 54 episodes of Breaking Bad in less than 120 hours. I feel like I should be headed to a television marathon anonymous meeting truthfully. Watching Walt and Jesse start in their infamous RV and graduate to their multi-million dollar meth lab was riveting. When arguments occurred or business was being discussed, all I could wait for were those bags full of blue crystal.

I became fascinated. I’d heard of crystal meth prior to the show, and it certainly appears to be an epidemic of sorts, especially in the midwest, but this empire that Walt and Jesse were trying to create was so oddly inspiring. Seeing the transformation of Walt can’t be explained any other way than shocking. Seeing the innocent high school chemistry teacher switch to the monster meth manufacturer of Albuquerque was mind bending writing and more importantly, brilliant acting.

After watching the first few episodes, I grew to care about Walt and his situation and even more so with Jesse since he’s more my age. While Jesse is of course a part of an underworld that I’ve never witnessed, I could see myself getting caught up in the money and the life. Not to mention, I literally laugh out loud every time Jesse yells something to the tune of: “Yeah, bitch! Magnets!”

It’s easy to see what appeals to these types of people. While the show is certainly a glamorized version of the meth world, it does a hell of a job sucking you into the world, while making you want to sprint away after each episode back to your quiet, safe suburb.

breaking bad five seasons smallThe constant tension between Walt and his wife, or Jesse, or his DEA agent brother-in-law, Hank is palpable.

There were some episode endings where I would literally yell out loud “Holy shit,” as the end credits were rolling. The fast forwarding at the beginning of the episodes is so addictive.

They’ve created the perfect formula (no pun intended) for putting their hooks into the audience at the beginning of each episode and latching on.

When you jump back to the current time, it’s always in your mind that you just saw the aftermath of something entirely disastrous and you sit on the edge of your seat like it’s the Superbowl and a hail marry was just thrown. When Walt let Jesse’s girlfriend die of a heroin overdose, I knew there was no turning back for him. Walt, thinking on the fly, was now a criminal mastermind who was out for himself, and also sometimes for the sake of Jesse’s well-being. Could he have been trying to scare Jesse straight by letting her overdose?

By season 3, I was fully invested. I could feel Walt’s fear of Gustavo in every episode, and now knowing how he “takes care of” Gus, it’s so wild to look back at his transformation. With Walt’s wife wanting nothing to do with his drug involvement, it’s gut wrenching to watch them fall apart. You see a happily married couple get ripped apart by a man’s life changing ambition, as well as fighting for his own life by defeating lung cancer.

Like other fans, I began hating Skyler due to her constant complaining, despite having all the reason in the world to act the way she does. That line, “Someone has to protect this family from the man who protects this family.” It broke through the screen, exploded the heads of Skyler haters around the globe. Despite my hatred for this character, she has reasons for being the way she is, but I found myself wanting to fast forward through her scenes as time went on. I’m very interested to find out how her character arc will end.

By the end of season 3, watching Walt tell Jesse that he can’t make it in time to kill Gale (the other chemist) – there’s no way around it, I was freaking out. Watching Jesse jump up and run, not thinking twice about killing Gale so that Walt could live, it was truly inspiring to see such comradery. Of course this resulted in Jesse having a very difficult time actually shooting Gale and dealing with his feelings afterwards about taking an innocent person’s life.

Jesse was in such visible, visceral anguish. Sure he had been tip toeing around this sketchy industry for years, but now his feet were firmly planted, steeped in blood. Luckily, Walt comes to his mental rescue, reassuring Jesse that had he not killed Gale, they would both be dead – which was true. We see Walt’s need for self preservation rear its head time after time, and it has essentially replaced his initial goal of leaving his family with enough money to live comfortably after his lung cancer most likely consumes him.

Season 4 sees the breakup of the partnership that Jessie and Walt have developed. Walt is instructed by Gus to work in the lab without his cooking partner, while Jesse goes on money pickups with Mike. Oh Mike, how we loved you. All business, no emotions – he’s who should have been the meth industry mastermind. The juxtaposition of a dead eye hit man and loving grandfather was fascinating.

Jesse grows bored riding shotgun for Mike, and you can tell that Gus is just trying to split Jesse and Walt up so that they don’t cause him anymore trouble. Mike’s basically Jesse’s babysitter, making sure he doesn’t slip back into old habits, and he proves to be very helpful when he saves Mike’s life during Gus’ own setup to make Jesse feel like he’s part of the crew again.

breaking bad season 6 wide 2

All the while, Walt brews his 99.1% blue-gold in their eight-million dollar underground lab. Watching them produce 200 lbs of meth a week was exciting, yet frightening at the same time. Despite it taking place in a fictional world, it’s clear that there’s someone out there doing something like this in the real world, and that people are buying massive amounts of this poison.

As a new fan, I sometimes struggled with the illegal aspects of the show, but five seasons in it doesn’t bother me any longer. It’s a business, as Walt would say. Who’s to say that similar types of behavior doesn’t occur in “legal” businesses. While someone may not end up with their throat cut, can we truly say companies don’t constantly push out their competitors? I loved the parallels that Skyler witnessed between her squeaky clean employer cooking his books and her husband cooking his meth.

Another episode where I found myself literally yelling out loud was when Gus, Mike, and Jesse head down to Mexico where the cartel wants Jesse to stay and cook meth for them permanently. When Gus poisons essentially the entire cartel, along with himself, it was mind blowing. I saw those little brown pills he took prior to the meeting and knew Gustavo had a plan to get all three back home.

But what a way to slice the head off of an entire cartel. He kills the boss, and every captain at the party. I have to give it to Gus, he’s tougher than hell drinking his own poison for the good of his company. Jesse proves himself once again after Mike gets shot during their exit after he kills Hector Salamanca’s grandson. Taking them to the tent/hospital and seeing the doctors only focusing on Gus was oddly difficult to stomach.

This again reminds us that money is paramount in this cutthroat, illegal industry. Luckily, Gus gets back on his feet fairly quickly after appearing to get his stomach pumped and Mike gets a weeklong gutshot wound healing vacation in Gustavo’s makeshift hospital.

breaking bad rememberBy the end of season 4, Hank is just getting too close to Gus’ operation and Gustavo fires Walter, telling him he’ll murder his entire family if he warns Hank about the hit.

With help from the DEA, all enter into hiding except Walt and Jesse. Both knowing that they must now kill Gus to stay alive.

After Walter comes up with a master plan to assassinate Gus, I realized now who the real monster was.

It wasn’t Gus, despite him slicing his own men’s throats at will; it wasn’t Mike, who stalked people better than the DEA ever could, and it certainly wasn’t Jesse – it was Walt. He builds a pipe bomb and tests the detonator in his own house.

It’s just chemistry, right?

During one failed attempt at a parking garage where Gus pulls out some sixth-sense madness, he doesn’t get into his 10-year old Volvo which Walt’s pipe bomb was attached to.

Walt realizes he must go back to the drawing board. Finding out that former cartel enforcer Hector Salamanca is enemies with Gus, he realizes that this will be the perfect way to kill Gus. When Gus walked out of Hector’s room appearing unscatched, and we only see one side of him I yelled “No way!” Then the camera pans to the left, and we see Gus straightening his tie as half his face is blown off. It was truly one of television’s greatest holy shit moments.

Going into season 5, I felt the total shift that Walt had taken. He was no longer in the game just for the money, but the power that came along with being at the top of the industry.

This shows up the most when he and Mike have business discussions, where Walt is clearly upset with the way the money is being cut up – especially when Mike lets he and Jesse know they have to continue to pay off the 10 guys in jail so they won’t rat them out.

“Just because you shot Jesse James, don’t make you Jesse James.” – Mike

I knew it was only a matter of time before Walter killed Mike. And sure enough, once Mike gets in a major pinch with the DEA, Walt takes him out for a couple of names he realizes he could have easily gotten from Lydia.

While Jesse and Walt do a bit of cooking with their genius plan of using bug-infested homes as cooking stations, Jesse soon realizes he wants out of the game after the incredibly suspenseful train robbing situation occurs. This was possibly my favorite episode. The sheer amount of heart stopping moments that occurred while draining the train of its methylamine is more than you get in an entire series of any other TV show. And having that poor boy wave, I imagine we all jumped out of our skin at that exact moment when Todd pulls out his gun and shoots him instantly while Jesse yells “No!”

It was a sad time for me, seeing Jesse so upset and willing to leave Walt. But he had no choice, he couldn’t deal with the fact that his actions indirectly led to the death of a young boy. The show took a turn then, not wrong or right, but a turn that I imagine everyone could feel. The hilariously ironic partnership of student and teacher was no more and that changed the dynamic of the show.

When Walt is finally on his own, he asks Todd, one of the pesticide employees, to assist him in cooking and Walt makes a fortune. When Walt’s wife takes him into the storage locker with all of his money, my jaw dropped. Yes, it’s not real, but Walt’s entire success was tied up in that one scene. His wife, estranged, his multi-million dollar empire resting in a storage box, and he finally tells Skyler that he won’t cook any longer – as fans sigh, not quite sure how we feel about his departure from the industry. Maybe we’re just glad that our main characters are all still breathing at this point and not in any danger – yet.

The first half of season 5 ends with Hank finding the book that Gale had given to Walt as a present while he uses the restroom. Hank’s facial expression is enough to scare us back into that fear we thought we had seen the last of as he sees “To my other favorite W.W” on the inside of the first page. He’s realized that there’s a great possibility that Walt is his Heisenberg.

‘Breaking Bad’ season 5 part 2 predictions

We’ve seen that Walt purchases a massive gun in the flashforward where he’s turning 52, so there will undoubtedly be a shootout of epic proportions. Personally I believe this will be used to either get his family back from a kidnapping, or possibly Jesse. I don’t think it will be used to simply kill people, unless Walt goes completely nuts. Sure, he’s a child-poisoning meth manufacturer, but he’s not yet reached face-slapping, Tuco status either.

Hank won’t arrest Walt, but will confront him about the evidence he’s found linking him to his Heisenberg. I think this may be a turning point for Hank, he’ll have to make a major decision that will cause him to transform as Walt has. He’s always been such a straight arrow DEA agent, but he can’t turn Walt in because it would look just as bad for him if the DEA were to find out that Walt had been hiding right under his nose. Hank does have a difficult time keeping things to himself though, so it’s possible he may spill the beans to his wife or someone else.

Jesse will be forced to cook again. They’ve written him into essentially hating the industry now, and the best way to shock viewers would be to have Jesse weeping under his gas mask, while brewing Walt’s blue crystal. This is a stretch, but Jesse has to get back into the story somehow. Since Walt has told Skyler he’s quit, Lydia and Walt’s other distributors will need product, and it’s widely known that Jesse can cook using Walt’s method.

Despite being in remission, Walt’s cancer will rear its head again and cause Walt to “break bad.” This will give him the push he needs to go full scarface in Albuquerque. We already see that he’s let himself go a bit in the 52-year-old flashforward, and this most likely means he’s either in hiding (possible given his fake license) or has given up on his appearance due to the cancer wreaking havoc on his whole body, possibly affecting his brain (his most prized possession). This will allow the show to go full circle, seeing as the first episode exposed us to Walt’s incurable cancer and it should end with Walt again accepting his fate.

The show will end in the desert with quite a few dead bodies lying on the ground, with either Walt left alone with only his cancer, his family and Jesse dead, or everyone dead except for Hank. Hank will do his best to make it look as though his family was never involved in such heinous acts – attempting to salvage their memories despite their actions. The transformation which should be most interesting this season will be Hank’s, who was left with the most grave decision at the end of season 5.

If you haven’t had a taste of this show yet, I’d suggest doing so. I was apprehensive at first, but after watching these five seasons in just five days, I’ve clearly become a Breaking Bad addict, and I’ll be looking forward to each Sunday until the show’s finale. For those who are already fans, please tell us your season 6 predictions below. Breaking Bad season 6 premieres this Sunday, August 11.

Editor’s Note: Hypable is aware that technically this is Breaking Bad season 5 Part 2. We’ve found through search data that the majority of the show’s audience searches for news using season 6 in their search phrase, so we’ve decided to stick with that title until further notice. We do apologize for any inconveniences this may cause our readers.

We finally have the title of the next entry in the Star Wars saga. But just what, or who, does The Last Jedi refer to?

It has been a long time coming, but we now know the title of Episode VIII. The somewhat ominous name for the film is accompanied by a red, rather than yellow logo, which doesn’t exactly bode well for our heroes. But, like it or not, The Last Jedi is here — and we’re going to break down what it could mean.

But first, we’re going to look at a little Star Wars history, and where we’ve seen a red logo, as well as the title The Last Jedi, before.

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We finally have the title of the next entry in the Star Wars saga. But just what, or who, does The Last Jedi refer to?

It has been a long time coming, but we now know the title of Episode VIII. The somewhat ominous name for the film is accompanied by a red, rather than yellow logo, which doesn’t exactly bode well for our heroes. But, like it or not, The Last Jedi is here — and we’re going to break down what it could mean.

But first, we’re going to look at a little Star Wars history, and where we’ve seen a red logo, as well as the title The Last Jedi, before.

The Last Jedi has been used twice as a title in the Star Wars universe. Yes, twice. You may have seen several references made over on Twitter to the 49th issue in the Star Wars comic series, titled The Last Jedi. One, most notably, by Pablo Hidalgo — a creative executive of the Lucasfilm Story Group.

It is unlikely that we will see any reference back to the comic within the central plot itself, but it could be nice to see a more subtle hat-tip to one of the origins of the title.

The Last Jedi has also been used as a title for a Star Wars novel, now part of Legends, post-Disney’s acquisition of Lucasfilm. The novel was a standalone follow-up to the Coruscant Nights series, centered around Jax Pavan, the last publicly known Jedi in the wake of Order 66. Much in the same vein as the aforementioned comic, it is unlikely that the novel will inform the story of Episode VIII, but — again — it could be interesting to hear a reference to Jax, somewhere over the course of the film.

As for the logo, there have also been several instances where red has either been used, or intended to be used, in the place of the now-classic yellow.

During the Clone Wars series, the logo was changed to red to signify the return of Darth Maul — the presumed-dead Dathomirian villain of Episode I. Could the use of red in the logo for The Last Jedi suggest the return of the Sith, and ‘balance’ to the Force? Though Kylo Ren is, unquestionably, on the Dark Side, there is no reference to his status as a Sith — or, indeed, that there are any within the First Order itself.

Of course, the red logo could simply be a reference to the original title and design for Return of the Jedi. Several teasers were created and posters printed with an ominous red logo, and the title Revenge of the Jedi, prior to Lucas reverting to Return instead. On some promotional material, Return of the Jedi also had red in its logo, as did Revenge of the Sith. With a darker tone being suggested by several cast members, will The Last Jedi’s logo change reinforce that?

There’s only one way to find out. Let’s break down exactly what The Last Jedi could mean.

Luke Skywalker is the last Jedi

The most obvious reading of The Last Jedi title is that it refers specifically to Luke Skywalker. He has, after all, been referred to as such multiple times across the Star Wars saga. In fact, the opening crawl to The Force Awakens set the scene for the First Order’s single-minded mission to hunt down and destroy Luke — and with him the last vestige of the Jedi Order.

But The Force Awakens certainly wasn’t the first time we’d heard the phrase “last Jedi” in relation to Luke Skywalker. For that, we need to look back to the Original Trilogy installment, Return of the Jedi, and Yoda’s final words to Luke.

‘When gone am I, the last of the Jedi will you be.’

Though Rey may have discovered her Force sensitivity during the course of The Force Awakens and traveled to Ahch-To in order to convince Luke to return, the fact still remains that she is not yet a Jedi. Not only that, but with Ben Solo’s fall and little reference made to any of Luke’s other students surviving the massacre at the hands of the Knights of Ren, it would stand to reason that Luke’s status as the last Jedi is solidly intact.

Rey is the last Jedi

We’ve heard several times over that The Last Jedi will be a far darker tale than its predecessor. And so, by the time the credits roll at the close of Episode VIII, could Rey inherit the title of last Jedi from Luke?

It wouldn’t be that much of a stretch, considering that Star Wars’ narrative has always worked cyclically. Fans have even remarked endlessly about the parallels between A New Hope and The Force Awakens. But as Han’s death at the hands of his son, Ben, mirrored Obi-Wan’s, so too could Luke’s potential death mirror Yoda’s from Return of the Jedi. It would be somewhat poetic — if heartbreaking to lose Luke so soon after Han.

Of course, Rey’s journey to Ahch-To and Luke doesn’t necessarily preclude that she might eventually become a Jedi herself. Speaking to MTV in 2016, Ridley remarked, “I don’t know if I am a Jedi. I don’t think I am. We’ve had this debate as to whether Leia is because she uses her Force powers. Just because she’s not like, ‘Oh I’m going on an adventure’ like Luke doesn’t make her any less Forceful.”

Should Rey refuse to train as a Jedi, and utilize her Force sensitivity in other ways — as we have seen with several other characters, including the Bendu from Star Wars Rebels — we could see the definitive end of the Jedi as we know them with Luke’s death, whenever that might occur.

Amongst certain circles of fan theorists, there is also one that Rey herself could fall to the Dark Side — another signifier for the end of the Jedi, should that occur. It’s not a theory that I’m particularly fond of, but I certainly won’t discredit it, as it is a fairly persistent one. And that red logo is definitely ominous…

There are multiple last Jedi

There’s nothing to suggest that the Jedi referenced in Episode VIII‘s title is singular. Jedi can, after all, refer to both a person and a group.

The Last Jedi could see the completion of Rey’s training with Luke, and the two return side-by-side, to fight equally as Jedi. It would certainly be the sort of sneaky word-play that Star Wars has become known for, but could there be more to it?

Per The Force Awakens, we know that Ben Solo has, and continues to struggle with, the call to the light inside him. Though Han Solo’s death at his hands would seem to suggest that his fall to the Dark Side is complete, and any ties remaining to the light severed, is that truly the case?

Could The Last Jedi see Ben, much like his grandfather before him, return to the light to fight alongside Rey and Luke, making all three the last of the Jedi?

Battle with the Knights of Ren

As referenced during the earlier segment focusing on Luke, we already know there was a massacre at the hands of the Knights of Ren, resulting in Luke becoming the last Jedi once more. But between the events of Return of the Jedi and The Force Awakens, Luke was by no means the last.

Is it possible that The Last Jedi could refer to this massacre? We caught a glimpse of, what we assume, was the moment the massacre occurred — when Rey took Luke’s lightsaber at Maz Kanata’s castle. Could we be privy to a flashback sequence at some point over the course of Episode VIII, revealing the exact details of Ben Solo’s fall, and the circumstances surrounding the death of Luke’s students?

Who — or what — do you think ‘The Last Jedi’ refers to?

‘The Last Jedi’ is scheduled for release December 15, 2017

When the world is a place of fear and hatred, stories have always provided an easy escape. But they serve an even greater purpose than that.

Our media, including its fictional content, exists to analyze and criticize society. X-Men was born out of the civil rights movement and LGBTQ+ fans have flocked to the franchise partly as they recognize the mutant concept as relatable to their struggle. In the turning points of history, stories take on a greater importance than ever before.

The media is immensely powerful. The clamor to make Elsa gay is the direct result of people recognizing how powerful that would be for children. Star Wars faced a backlash from those who could not bear the thought of a woman and two men of color getting such significant roles in the galactic story.

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When the world is a place of fear and hatred, stories have always provided an easy escape. But they serve an even greater purpose than that.

Our media, including its fictional content, exists to analyze and criticize society. X-Men was born out of the civil rights movement and LGBTQ+ fans have flocked to the franchise partly as they recognize the mutant concept as relatable to their struggle. In the turning points of history, stories take on a greater importance than ever before.

The media is immensely powerful. The clamor to make Elsa gay is the direct result of people recognizing how powerful that would be for children. Star Wars faced a backlash from those who could not bear the thought of a woman and two men of color getting such significant roles in the galactic story.

However, now possibly more than ever before, we also need to make sure that the content that is churned out into the world is the best it can be. Our arguments have become increasingly binary in all things. We must take lessons from the recent bitter presidential race; Clinton lost so much support because she was tarred as the “lesser evil.”

Clinton was not in the same realm of evil as Trump. There was no comparison but because of her highly questionable stances on certain issues, the Democrats felt unable to say that she was flawed but she was also the best choice. Instead of being able to accept nuance, the narrative is of good vs evil and so when one side might not be that perfect, silence ensues and evil is allowed to dominate the debate.

The same warnings are present whenever it comes to reviewing any content. We must be able to say that something was good but can do better in other aspects. Such an argument does not equal hatred. We need to seek the best content possible by celebrating what works, and challenging what doesn’t. X-Men has a fantastic concept, but when white actors are constantly cast in roles designed for people of color then that must be criticized. Rowling is brilliant at delivering metaphors on the dangers of racism, but how many people of color ever feature in her stories?

In fan culture, we love hard. It’s one of the best aspects of fandom but when it risks cutting us off from asking for better content then there’s an issue. It’s particularly an issue whenever it comes to specific characters. We tend to talk of them in one dimensional terms, so if we don’t like them it’s taken that we mean that they have no value in the wider story. Yet, this is very rarely the case.

Draco Malfoy had an absurdly huge fan base but he was never a good guy, and saying this does not mean that there is no value to him. Malfoy was fantastic to the story but he was also arrogant, bigoted and selfish. He had good moments, such as trying to save his friend, but that’s the point; people are complex and that’s the beauty of characters. Even Rowling has said she doesn’t understand the love for Draco, but the love for him says more about the way we consume media than anything else.

The Joker is one of the most fascinating characters ever created and I love to watch/read him. I also hate him. He’s one of my favorites and I never want his story to stop but this is not a good person where there is anything redeemable. Our favorites don’t have to be good guys, they don’t even need us to defend them, and that’s okay. The problem comes when we do try to justify toxic behavior, particularly in an era that is now celebrating toxic masculinity. Our favorites are allowed to be horror shows and that’s why stories exist – to safely explore that concept. We can absolutely love the villains as long as we recognize them for that.

Writers love their characters being pulled apart too. They love debate, they love people accepting the shades of grey and the badness in them. They don’t want a perfect or idealized character. The fact is, few heroes are ever worthy of complete devotion. Lost’s John Locke may have been right about the island, but how many people did he kill to get there? Hermione was an inspiration to so many women but when she tried to free house elves, it was done without their consent and against their wishes.

Writers appreciate when we take the time to work out what that character means and how they reflect in the world we’re living in. We can be better than Harley in “Mad Love,” where she’s been broken so many times by Joker but still romanticizes him because he sends her a rose. It’s a blunt message but it’s reflective of media today. We can enjoy the spectacle but we cannot justify the bad, whether that’s poor character choices made by good people or just generally bad writing.

We need a more open attitude than we’ve ever had with analyzing fandoms. It’s thanks to reviews that the horrendously creepy Passengers tanked. Using our voices works, and that’s why Hollywood is fighting Trump tooth and nail. Fans and journalists can participate too. We’re not always going to agree but we can work towards the same goal of demanding better content, and not just taking the content we are given at face value.

Let’s talk about how the zombie apocalypse in Fear The Walking Dead is relevant today while asking that the writers stop killing off everyone but the one white family. We can talk about the importance of Dumbledore being gay while asking for answers about Depp’s casting. In such a creative industry, the audience never should have to settle for whatever is offered.

Do you agree fans need to demand better content from their fandoms?

Some awesome celebrities turned out today to support the Women’s March on Washington movement, in order to send a strong message to the Trump administration that women’s rights are human rights!

Massive crowds all over the world today are taking part in the Women’s March to send a message about women’s rights. Here at Hypable we give a big shout out to all of those taking a stand today. To show that you’re not alone in this fight, here’s a look at some of the celebrities who were among the estimated four million marchers who showed up to support you in D.C. and all over the world.

Emma Watson and Bonnie Wright

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Some awesome celebrities turned out today to support the Women’s March on Washington movement, in order to send a strong message to the Trump administration that women’s rights are human rights!

Massive crowds all over the world today are taking part in the Women’s March to send a message about women’s rights. Here at Hypable we give a big shout out to all of those taking a stand today. To show that you’re not alone in this fight, here’s a look at some of the celebrities who were among the estimated four million marchers who showed up to support you in D.C. and all over the world.

Emma Watson and Bonnie Wright

Kristen Stewart

Charlize Theron

Madonna

Nick Offerman

Sir Ian McKellen

Candice King, Julie Plec and Kayla Ewell

Mindy Kaling

A photo posted by Mindy Kaling (@mindykaling) on

Darren Criss and Nick Lang

Melissa Benoist

💪#womensmarchonwashington

A photo posted by Melissa Benoist (@melissabenoist) on

Misha Collins

#womansmarch Jacksonville, FL. Fight on!

A photo posted by Misha Collins (@misha) on

Aja Naomi King and Alfred Enoch

Resistance. Respect. #womensmarch 👊🏾

A photo posted by Aja King (@ajanaomi_king) on

Lin-Manuel Miranda

Joss Whedon

Edgar Wright

Miley Cyrus

Ariana Grande

today filled my heart with so much hope !! got to meet many beautiful, passionate people and march alongside my loved ones. the sun came out for us. we are so much stronger and louder than hatred, ignorance, sexism, racism, agism, homophobia, transphobia, body shaming, slut shaming, prejudice, discrimination of all kinds, patriarchal conditioning and the backwards expectations of what a woman should be! I'm so proud of / inspired by everyone who marched today and thankful that there are so many people on this planet currently celebrating how brilliant and magical women truly are! let's keep our voices loud, passionate & peaceful! let's continue being strong for each other and to build each other up! let us stay connected to our divinity. 🌸♡🌌

A photo posted by Ariana Grande (@arianagrande) on

John Legend

#WomensMarch

A photo posted by John Legend (@johnlegend) on

Chrissy Teigen and America Ferrara

Dame Helen Mirren

Gillian Anderson

Bryan Fuller

Neil Gaiman

Kerry Washington with Natalie Portman

… and with Laverne Cox

Ben Barnes

Amy Schumer and Uzo Aduba

A photo posted by @amyschumer on

Gina Rodriguez

Carlos Valdes, Arthur Darvill, Danielle Panabaker, Caity Lotz and Keiynan Lonsdale

Maggie and Jake Gyllenhaal

Kevin McHale

Chris Colfer

Scarlett Johansson

Blake Lively

Yoko Ono and Whoopi Goldberg

Jessica Chastain

Alicia Keys and Janelle Monae

Katy Perry

Zendaya

That's right…

A photo posted by Zendaya (@zendaya) on

Troye Sivan

Willow Smith

Mark Ruffalo

Yip. Well said. Borrowed sign from @dorisfullgrabe design by @dirtybandits #womensmarch Nyc

A photo posted by Mark Ruffalo (@markruffalo) on

Paul Bettany

Eddie Izzard

Stephen Colbert

Did you turn out to support the Women’s March?