Sandra Oh’s Cristina Yang faced the consequences of an abortion and a crumbling marriage in season 8 of Grey’s Anatomy. She looked back on the past season in an interview with The Hollywood Reporter.

Oh shared her favorite scene from the last season, recalling Cristina’s involvement in Henry’s death.

Looking back on the season, is there one particular scene that you’re most proud of?
It’s an earlier episode with Teddy (Kim Raver), and it was a very technically difficult scene: Telling Teddy that Henry (Scott Foley) had died was a difficult scene, but there was one episode after that where Teddy needs to hear what happened in the room over and over again. All Cristina does is tell her what has happened medically, and all my dialogue was completely medical; I would just spout this out over and over again because she would just need to hear it until finally at the end of the episode, something shifts for her and she accepts what happened. I remember getting that episode and reading it in the run-through, and all my dialogue was reams and reams of medical jargon. I knew I had to start memorizing it right away and asked them not to change it since it was very challenging. You saw a crystallized version of Cristina, where she does her job and she hangs on to what she has to do and delivers the information. It’s vintage Cristina. Then everything with Owen is Cristina coming apart.

She also discussed the season finale and having to say goodbye to two Seattle Grace regulars.

Filming the finale, in which Grey’s said farewell to two castmembers — Chyler Leigh’s Lexie, who died, and Kim Raver’s Teddy, who moved on — what was that process like for you?
The finale was such a great experience, everyone really got out of their comfort zone. Those were some really painful, devastating scenes. We saw one scene cut together, and I had to get my hair and makeup redone; I could not stop weeping — and I wasn’t in that scene. It was extremely difficult because people come in and out over eight years. It’s rare to have certain people be around you for eight years or five years or even three years. There’s a kind of carnival aspect of to it. A lot of times for plays or films you come in for six weeks, fall in love with people, and you leave. You become family members and have really deep ties with people even if you don’t spend time outside of work with them. When you have to let go of some of those things, I found it extremely difficult and extremely sad. We’ve been down for almost a week now, and I’m just extremely depressed and recuperating, but it’s not just the physical recuperation. This has happened to me before with certain projects that I have left that I feel really low, and I know we’re coming back, but certain things and dynamics will have shifted, and there’s a lot of that makes me very sad.

Read more from the interview at THR, which includes Sandra reflecting on her emotional scenes with Kevin McKidd (Owen).

m4s0n501